A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'army' mean?

Find out what army means. Army is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

army

A large organized body of soldiers that consists of one or more corps. There were 23 Confederate armies, which were named after states, such as the Army of Northern Virginia. The Union consisted of 16 armies, all named after rivers, like the Army of the Potomac. An army consisted of several divisions: the infantry, artillery, cavalry, and navy.

1 company = 50-100 men
10 companies = 1 regiment
4+ regiments = 1 brigade
2-5 brigades = 1 division
2+ divisions = 1 corps
1+ corp = 1 army

The term "army" is used extensively in my novel, A Beautiful Glittering Lie. Here are several examples:

(Page 8)
“There should be a well-instructed and disciplined army,” Davis continued, “more numerous than would usually be required on a peace establishment …”

(Page 8)
“I’m fixin’ to jine the army,” added David.

(Pages 8-9)
Biting his lower lip to regain his composure, David glanced at him, noticing his father’s lofty stature, and the concerned expression on his clean-shaven face as he listened to the president’s words. Looking back at the dignitaries, he could pay attention only momentarily before his mind drifted again. Instead of the army, he envisioned himself enlisting as a Pony Express rider, even though he knew they only allowed orphans. For a few moments, he imagined riding through the wilderness, alone on horseback across the dusty desert, pursued by marauding Indians. It was a dangerous adventure, just like those in dime novels he had read, about his hero, Kit Carson. In order to do it, he would have to run away from home, and steal his father’s horse as well. Even though he was only fifteen, enlisting in the army would probably be easier for his kinfolk to accept.

(Page 10)
“What if everything he says is true?” asked David. “And he asks for volunteers to jine the army?”

(Page 12)
“And ole Jeff Davis said somethin’ about bein’ ready by recruitin’ an army,” Hiram was saying. His mother and sisters looked over at David as he entered.

(Page 13)
“Governor Moore has authorized establishin’ an army in Alabama,” said Mr. Skidmore, a local resident who was standing near the wood-burning stove in the center of the store with several others. “He’s called for two thousand troops to garrison the coasts.”

(Page 16)
On the following morning, Hiram addressed his family at the dining room table. “I have some news for y’all,” he said, his voice strained with seriousness. “Your ma and I have discussed it, and I’m enlistin’ in the army.” He looked around at his children, who gaped at him. “In fact, I’ve already signed up.” At a loss for elaboration, he fell silent.

(Page 18)
“I want to know why he’s runnin’ off to jine the army.” With that, Kit stomped back to his haggard horse, mounted, and rode off.

(Page 20)
Bud went on with his news. “I heard tell Colonel Lee resigned from the U.S. Army so’s he could fight for Virginee,” he informed Hiram. “He’s married to Mary Custis, you know. She’s the great grand-daughter of Martha Washin’ton.”

(Page 23)
Jake ran outside with David at his heels. They jumped onto their horses and kicked them to go. To David’s surprise, Sally broke into a canter, easily passing Jake’s aged mare. He reached the decrepit, run-down farm first. While he waited for Jake to catch up, he looked around at the deteriorating outbuildings, the neglected, overgrown fields, and the dark, empty house. The thought occurred to him that the Yankees could attack and take away everything they owned. His farm might someday look just as derelict. A shiver ran down his spine. He shook it off, thinking his imagination was running away with him. The Yankees come down here? he thought. That’ll never happen. Our army will whip them before they ever git the chance. Jake neared the farmhouse, so David dismounted, all the while teasing his best friend.

(Page 28)
“For the next few days, you will be accountable to me! I am here to make y’all into the finest soldiers our country has to offer! By the time I’m done, y’all will be the best damn fightin’ army there is!”

(Pages 29-30)
They managed to put together an interesting concoction of cornbread, wild onions, carrots, and the army’s allotted pork, heated it through, and poured it into their tin cups, making stew. To their gratification, it tasted quite delicious, so much so that Bud bragged to the tent mates next to them. Before they knew it, their comrades were putting their own rations in, and a few others contributed as well, combining their efforts into a spectacular feast. By the time they were finished, they complained of being too full, and lounged by the cozy campfire, listening to a fiddler squeakily draw his bow across the strings in an attempt to play “Nelly Bly.” One of the young men who had been drawn in to the banquet was George T. Anderson, the soldier Hiram had met on the train ride to Dalton. George sat scribbling in his journal while the other men relaxed, exchanging stories of their home lives.

(Page 30)
The regiment joined with General Joseph E. Johnston’s Army of the Shenandoah, and was attached to Brigadier General Barnard E. Bee’s Third Brigade. For the remainder of the week, the recruits enjoyed their leisurely life, faithfully attended Sunday services, read their prayer books, and learned how to fend for themselves by performing duties traditionally left for the womenfolk, such as cooking and darning. The soldiers received sewing kits called housewives, and variations of religious literature from the Army Christian Association, pamphlets that were referred to as tracts, and entitled, “Prepare for Battle,” “A Mother’s Parting Words to Her Soldier Boy,” and “Sufferings of the Lost.” The Alabamians filled their time with scripture, or sang hymns, such as “Nearer My God to Thee” and “How Sweet the Sound.”

(Page 32)
By mid-July, the Union Army finally began to move, and on Thursday, July 18, the Alabamians received orders to strike tents and cook two days’ rations in preparation for a march. The sick, who were principally suffering from the measles, were left behind in Winchester.

(Page 33)
It wasn’t long before the Yankees came into view: their appearance seemed surreal. The men of the 4th Alabama were confronted with the entire advancing Union Army. As they neared, the regiments on either side of the North Alabamians fell away. Colonel Jones ordered his men to hold fast their line of defense while he had them march up a hill to a low fence surrounding a cornfield.

(Page 33)
For some reason, the Union Army ceased firing at noon. Bracing themselves for another attack, the Rebels utilized the time to check their firearms. Word came that artillery was running low, which caused a slight panic, but Jones assured his men that they could win the battle before their ammunition ran out.

(Page 33)
After two hours of quiet, the Yankees resumed their assault, and the Confederates fought off several Union advances. Men in colorful garb fashioned after French Algerian Zouaves attacked first, but were driven back. Then came, one at a time, three other regiments, but all eventually broke and ran. Their uniforms caused confusion, for men on either side were dressed in both blue and gray, including Colonel Jones, who wore the blue uniform he had donned while previously serving in the U.S. Army.

(Page 34)
As the regiment moved left, an artillery battery cut through their ranks. Bee and his army veered right, while the rest of the regiment moved forward into the woods.

(Page 46)
Lincoln reportedly said to McClellan, “The supreme command of the army will entail a vast labor upon you,” to which the general replied, “I can do it all.” His pompous, arrogant nature was overlooked, for he was adored by his men, and so he deemed himself worthy of the elevated position.

(Page 55)
The weather had been typical, although Hiram, Bud, and the rest of their regiment thought differently, since they were unaccustomed to Virginia’s snowy winters. General Joe Johnston’s Army of Northern Virginia established their winter quarters, and the camp sprawled from Fredericksburg southwest into the Shenandoah Valley, with the 4th Alabama constructing their site near Manassas Junction at Dumfries.

(Page 55)
Out of sheer boredom, some infantrymen played practical jokes on their comrades. One such fellow, Enoch Campbell, whom Bud and Hiram met upon their arrival into the army, was appointed barber. For his own entertainment, Enoch frequently shaved half of his patrons’ faces before walking off to leave the other half unshaven. A few of the younger, more irresponsible men planted gunpowder near their messmates’ bedrolls, finding great fun in exploding it while their friends lay sleeping, until they were severely reprimanded by their superiors. Some unruly soldiers were disciplined for their disruptive behavior by spending time in the “bullpen,” or guardhouse, and given just bread and water to sustain on. Other offenders were paraded around camp to the tunes of “Yankee Doodle” and “Rough’s March,” wearing only barrels, with signs around their necks that read “liar” and “thief.” Several were ordered to carry out extra sentry duty, or were refused their pay, although the Confederacy had yet to compensate any of its defenders.

(Page 55)
The war started to revive. Robert E. Lee had been defeated at Cheat Mountain, but the Rebels came out victorious at Balls Bluff. Two more states joined the Confederacy—Missouri and Kentucky. By March, Johnston moved his army to the Rappahannock River. The Alabamians were anxious for a fight.

(Page 56)
General Johnston relocated the 4th Alabama to join with the main army south of the Rappahannock and moved it in the direction of Richmond. In early March, he learned that McClellan was encroaching, so he hastily transferred his troops from Centreville, leaving behind half-cooked food and property belonging to the Confederate army. He moved his men south of the Rappahannock, but not before leaving Quaker guns behind in empty earthworks to deter his rival. The “guns” were actually logs that had been cut and painted to resemble cannon snouts.

(Page 56)
The family learned three days later that a great battle was taking place in Tennessee, near Shiloh Church, which was only about eighty miles from Huntsville. Reports of the battle were carried in by courier. David eagerly hovered around Ben Johnson’s in anticipation of incoming telegrams, and while he was there, a courier rode in. According to the messenger, some twenty thousand troops were converging on the area, and the fighting was bloody. Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston had been killed, and the Union army had been chased back to Pittsburg Landing on the Tennessee River. From the looks of things, the Rebels were victorious, according to the dispatch rider, who immediately set off toward Huntsville to retrieve more information. Waving his hat in the air, he let out a whoop and rode away.

(Page 57)
Ormsby Mitchel’s Union army marched into undefended Huntsville early the following morning. Once David and Jake found out, they couldn’t wait to investigate, and they finally found the opportunity to sneak off early one crisp spring morning a week later.

(Page 66)
Uncontrollably, David shuddered. He glanced around at the solemn, downturned eyes, glad that they didn’t see his involuntary reaction, and wondered if his father’s army was faring any better. Deciding it was time to leave, he bid everyone good-day.

(Page 66)
McClellan’s army occupied Yorktown. Hiram’s regiment was bivouacked among George Washington’s old breastworks, which were still plainly visible. Many expressed pride in fighting for their liberty, just as the patriots of the Revolution had done. Because they were without utensils, the men resorted to cooking “Indian style” by placing dough on peeled hickory bark and setting it over their campfires to bake bread, or skewing their food on sticks and holding it over the open flames. They managed to acquire a good amount of oysters, which they relished with delight. The regimental pets had dwindled down to only a few dogs. Mysteriously, the chickens had disappeared, although Hiram and Bud knew they had all been eaten. The goat, it was discovered, had developed an appetite for kepis. He too vanished soon after, most likely into a stew.

(Page 66)
Their relatively comfortable existence was soon disrupted, however, because they were ordered to march up the peninsula to Richmond. Before they reached Williamsburg, which was only twelve miles from Yorktown, the 4th Alabama was moved ahead of Johnston’s entire army, along with the Third Brigade, the 18th Georgia, Hampton’s Legion, and General John Bell Hood’s Texans. The troops proceeded to West Point on the York River, but the going was slow because of ankle-deep mud and heavy rain. Exhausted and without rations, the men marched until late into the night. When they could go no farther, they fell upon the ground to sleep. Hearing artillery fire coming from the direction of Williamsburg, they knew McClellan was hot on their heels, but they had left a surprise for him there—land mines.

(Page 67)
After a while, the 4th Alabama became restless, with nothing to break up the monotony of their inactivity, except for their artillery, which fired halfheartedly at the Union army’s observation balloon. Hiram’s messmates expressed their discontent about being idle as well, and Blue Hugh complained the most, living up to his nickname. Hiram expected the man’s cynicism to dissipate once spring set in, but instead, Blue Hugh just became more sarcastic.

(Pages 67-68)
Early the following morning, the Alabamians traveled eight miles to the beat of their drums toward Seven Pines and their foe. The Stars and Bars, St. Andrews Cross, the regimental colors, and the Bonnie Blue Flag all flew gallantly above the advancing Confederates. Once they arrived, they saw that the Union army had been driven out, for all that remained were their empty tents. Throughout the course of the day, the 4th was maneuvered to different locations, but still didn’t see any fighting. By evening, they had been placed on the Richmond and York River railroad tracks. The empty camp was in a patch of woods to their left, and an active Union battery was in front of them.

(Page 68)
As soon as the men took their position, the Union soldiers opened fire. The Alabamians were forced to endure an unmerciful bombardment, since no other regiment appeared to support them. While they lay in wait, tolerating the shelling, General Johnston slowly rode up to them. He sat upon his mount, staring off at the advancing Union army. Suddenly, a piece of shell struck him in the shoulder, knocking him off his horse. As rapidly as he had fallen, a group of litter bearers besieged him and carried him off the field.

(Page 68)
While the hours ticked by, the soldiers grew restless, but knew there was nothing they could do. Early in the afternoon, General Lee arrived. The men soon learned that he had been given control of the Confederate army, and that General Smith was relieved of command. Lee promptly renamed his soldiers. What had previously been known as the “Army of the Potomac” became the “Army of Northern Virginia.” For his first act of authority, he commanded his troops to “strike the tent,” and returned them to Richmond. The 4th Alabama had lost eight of their own, and nineteen were wounded. General Whiting was placed in command of the division, while Colonel Law was designated as brigade commander. The men had “seen the elephant” once more, and speculated about when the beast would reappear to rear its ugly head.

(Page 68)
As summer approached, David learned of events that ignited the region. Frank Gurley and his cavalrymen, who were being referred to as his “Seven Immortals,” became more active in their attempts to aggravate General Mitchel in Huntsville. At McDavid’s Mill, they captured four sutlers’ wagons and ninety-six bales of cotton that Northern buyers were preparing to ship north. They also made several attacks on the Union garrison at the railroad bridge over Flint River. On one occasion, they killed a Federal soldier and captured another. Annoyed with their constant harassment, the Union army burned the town of Whitesburg to the ground in retribution. Local businessman, “Uncle” Billy Ryan, distributed supplies to Gurley and his men, as well as to needy families in the area. Harper’s Weekly printed a story about General Mitchel’s success in capturing north Alabama down to the Tennessee River, which included Huntsville. The article, embellished with a beautiful painting of the town, enraged David when he saw it.

(Page 71)
The picket approached, saw they were harmless, and relaxed his weapon. “You boys want to fight for the Union army?”

(Page 74)
General McClellan moved his vast army to the south side of the Chickahominy River, in an attempt to confront Lee below Richmond. While he was there, the commander of Robert E. Lee’s Confederate cavalry, General J. E. B. Stuart, received fame by riding around McClellan’s troops. Originally ordered to reconnoiter the Army of the Potomac’s movements, Stuart and his cavaliers decided to risk their lives by going around, instead of returning to Richmond the way they had come, and their successful exploit awarded them the capture of 170 prisoners and 300 horses and mules. According to one report, the cavaliers slowed down only to accept bouquets and kisses from admiring women.

(Page 74)
On June 17, General Lee sent the 4th Alabama and Hood’s Texans to the Shenandoah Valley to support Stonewall Jackson, while Union General McDowell was ordered to defend Washington against Jackson’s advance. Hiram’s regiment marched 150 miles, and was allowed to rest for only one day during the journey. Eight days later, the men bivouacked near Ashland, twelve miles from Richmond. Circling around McClellan’s army, they were now behind it. The following morning, General Lee pursued the fleeing Federals.

(Page 76)
On June 29, the Rebels crossed the bridge and followed the retreating Union army to Malvern Hill, where McClellan made a stand. The 4th Alabama was subjected to heavy artillery fire while they supported their batteries, until darkness fell, when they were forced to endure a heavy thunderstorm.

(Page 76)
The injured Confederates were carried to Richmond, where nearly every house was a hospital, and every woman served as a nurse. General McClellan retreated to his gunboats on the James River, while General Jackson moved his troops to Harrison’s Landing. They arrived on July 3, and remained there for five more days, until General Lee ordered his army back to Richmond, and restructured it into two corps. The 4th Alabama fell under the command of Generals Lee and Longstreet, and General Jackson led the other corps. General Whiting was transferred, so General Hood took his command. While camped at Richmond, the men acquired new clothing, cooking utensils, kettles, frying pans, and “spiders,” or skillets.

(Page 76)
The Union army was far superior in numbers and rations, although McClellan had been fooled into thinking otherwise. The Rebels realized that they had an enormous task before them, but they were willing to accept the challenge, because they adored “Bobby” Lee and Colonel Law. Their loyalty ran deep, even though the men were all too familiar with hunger, as well as discomfort brought on by rain and vermin. Despite new clothing, their shoes were wearing thin. Regardless, they still intended to keep their vow to the Confederacy. Hiram was no different. He fully intended to see the thing through, because his conscience wouldn’t allow it any other way. It was his duty to remain.

(Page 77)
Union sympathizers arrived in Decatur and made it their mission to report Rebels who were hiding in the hills. Union Colonel Abel Streight decided to pursue the offenders, so he took a regiment of infantry and one company of cavalry into the mountains to hunt them down. The cavalry was attacked by Confederate scouts, so they returned to Decatur, but the infantry was successful in capturing the fugitives, and forced them to enlist with the 1st Alabama Cavalry. On July 10, they were inducted into the Union Army.

(Page 77)
“Ma’am,” one of them said, touching the brim of his kepi, “we’ve been sent to scout the area, and if you have anything the Union army deems necessary, it is our lawful right to confiscate it.”

(Page 78)
Leaving his family there, he returned to the farm. He waited alone as night fell, watching stars shower overhead in the dark sky, and recalled the same occurrence a year ago, when he and Jake had lounged upon the Kimballs’ veranda, contemplating the war and their trip to Huntsville, where they first caught sight of Wheeler’s Confederate army preparing for war.

(Page 79)
General Lee’s Confederates spent July and the first part of August recuperating. Jackson moved to Gordonsville, where he encountered Pope, and deceived the Union general by lighting numerous fires to make his forces appear larger than they were. This stratagem proved effective, because Pope retreated, but not before Jackson captured a portion of his army. Meanwhile, the 4th Alabama repositioned from Richmond to Gordonsville to support Jackson. After spending three months in Richmond, they were more than happy to be back on the march. Hiram and Bud joked between themselves as they tramped along, while Bo the dog obediently trotted behind Orange Hugh.

(Page 79)
By August 20, both corps joined together, and continued on across the Rapidan River toward Culpeper Court House. Pope discovered their advance, so he withdrew across the Rappahannock. Once the Rebels arrived, the people of Culpeper came out to greet them, cheering and waving flags in welcome. Some told horror stories of how they had been abused by Pope’s Union army. Others described how Pope’s own men despised him because of his arrogant, pompous nature, and how Pope’s bombastic braggadocio deflated his troops’ morale.

(Page 79)
Jackson’s corps crossed the Rappahannock in an attempt to flank the Union army, while General Lee’s portion stayed behind to keep Pope occupied. The Alabamians learned of Jackson’s departure a few days later, but didn’t flinch in their determination. The fact that they were immensely outnumbered didn’t deter them.

(Page 81)
Later in the day, a soldier from Company A returned to camp, explaining that he had been captured by Sigel’s Dutch, who were really Germans, but in the Federals’ haste to depart, he was left behind. The Confederates were fed better rations than they had been given since leaving Richmond. Musicians in Hiram’s company, Foggarty, Halsey, and Hickey, celebrated the victory by playing Irish music with instruments they found abandoned on the battlefield by the Union army. That evening, Bud and several others returned to camp. Happy to see that his friend had recovered, Hiram greeted him enthusiastically, and the two exchanged stories of their exploits.

(Page 82)
“Yessiree. They jist up and left. General Braxton Bragg’s army is gettin’ too close, and they ran ’em off!”

(Page 83)
On strict orders to respect the citizens, the Rebels were on their best behavior, and didn’t disturb anything. Upon entering Maryland, they received an icy reception, which was not at all what they had expected. The Marylanders heard from Union sympathizers in Europe that Lee expected to conscript all able-bodied men for his army, and even though that wasn’t the case, their sentiments were equally divided. Hiram overheard a few spectators, who were observing their march from open second-story windows, comment on how they couldn’t distinguish the generals from the enlisted men, because they were all in filthy tatters. General Lee ordered his regimental bands to play “Maryland, My Maryland.” His men cheered while they marched through, but they were later disappointed, for they were unable to successfully recruit enough soldiers to replenish their depleted ranks.

(Page 84)
The Confederates heard that General Pope had been replaced by none other than McClellan, who had turned his Grand Army of the Potomac away from Washington, and was headed back in the direction of Fredericktown. The Alabamians reached Hagerstown, where they awaited news from Jackson. While there, they discovered that the Maryland countryside had been left virtually untainted, unlike the ravaged landscape of Virginia.

(Page 84)
Their reprieve was short-lived, for the next morning, September 14, they were ordered to hurriedly prepare rations and march back to Boonesborough Gap. The men learned that their sudden turnabout was due to a blunder made during the previous week. A copy of Confidential Special Order No. 191, wrapped around three cigars, was discovered by a Union soldier in Fredericktown, and given to General McClellan. The order outlined Lee’s intentions, so McClellan reacted by attempting to cut off the Confederate army, which was scattered from Harpers Ferry to Hagerstown. The Alabamians raced to the aid of General Hill, who was subjected to protecting the gap with his small army until reinforcements arrived.

(Page 85)
At 3:00 a.m., the men were awakened to the sound of McClellan’s army attacking the Georgians, who had come to their relief the previous night. For an hour and a half, the battle raged, until General Hood was called upon for assistance. He brought his two brigades to the front, one of which included the 4th Alabama. As they were ordered to line up, Orange Hugh approached his messmates in a panic.

(Page 87)
The Alabamians camped in the valley of the Opequon Creek, where they recuperated from their hard campaign. During their hiatus, the men received letters from home, discovering that ties had been restored, due to the departure of the Union army from north Alabama. They waited in anticipation to hear their names called out by Quartermaster George Washington Jones, and went up to answer the post. Hiram and Bud both received letters, and after reading to themselves, they shared them with one another.

(Page 88)
On October 8, the Battle of Perryville took place, which was Kentucky’s only major battle thus far, between Union General Buell and Confederate General Braxton Bragg. Because the Republicans thought Buell was proslavery for wanting to protect Southerners’ property, he was relieved of his command. On October 9, General Longstreet was promoted to lieutenant general. A day later, so was General Jackson, and on that same day, General Stuart began his raid into Pennsylvania. The troopers rode up to Chambersburg, where they helped themselves to fresh horses and newly harvested fodder. They continued on around the Union army and returned to Virginia, completing Stuart’s second ride around McClellan.

(Page 91)
Glaring at him, Jake shook his head. “You know he’ll jist lie about bein’ in the Union army. His ma thinks he and Lemuel jined up with ole Braxton Bragg.”

(Page 93)
David stayed informed by acquiring current editions of the Huntsville Confederate, which had been reduced down to only one sheet folded into two pages, due to the paper shortage. Major changes were taking place within both armies. As of November 10, Alabama had supplied over sixty thousand men to the Confederate cause. President Lincoln replaced McClellan yet again, this time with General Burnside, not so much because of Burnside’s performance at the recent Battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam as the Yankees were calling it, but because of his displayed abilities at First Manassas. Frustrated that “Little Napoleon” had refused to aggressively pursue and attack the Rebels by inaccurately assuming he was outnumbered, Lincoln was quoted as saying to him, “If you don’t want to use the army, I should like to borrow it for a while.”

(Page 97)
Hiram glanced around at his comrades, who were entrenched on either side of him, waiting for another Yankee advance. With time to reflect, he thought back to the previous month’s events. The 4th Alabama had abandoned their encampment for Culpeper Court House, and stayed there until November 22, when Lee discovered that Burnside was headed north from Richmond, so he assembled his troops near the quaint town of Fredericksburg. The Confederate army swelled to almost twice its size, due to returning soldiers who had become ill prior to their march into Maryland. Remaining on the south side of the icy Rappahannock River, the Rebels gazed at the church spires that rose up from the town like bony, skeletal fingers, reaching to the heavens for sanctuary.

(Page 98)
On several occasions, Hiram heard music float across the river. The Yankee bands played new songs he had never heard before. One sounded like “John Brown’s Body,” but the words had been changed. This, he learned, was the Union army’s new anthem, “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” He didn’t appreciate the lyrics, since they equated the Confederates to devils, but listened with interest, nonetheless. Another Yankee song they played repetitively was called the “Battle Cry of Freedom.” He liked that one better, but it still didn’t make his spirit soar like “Dixie” did. The Federals played “The Star-Spangled Banner” and “Hail Columbia,” songs the Southerners once held dear, and waited for Confederate bands to reply, but no reprisal came. As if reading Hiram’s mind, the Yankees rambunctiously played “Dixie’s Land.” Men on both sides of the river burst into cheers, which fell away to mutual laughter.

(Page 98)
At dawn on December 11, the Rebels’ heavy artillery report sounded the alarm: two shots fired in quick succession signaled the Union army’s advance across the river. The 4th fell out and took their position in line. They heard heavy firing down in the town and learned that McLaws’ Division was shooting at the Yankees to prevent them from constructing pontoon bridges.

(Page 101)
The men awoke to find it was raining, as it usually did after a battle. They discovered that Burnside’s Federals had crossed the river overnight, demoralized into retreating to Washington. A wave of cheers rushed over the Rebel ranks. While the rain dissipated to drizzle, Bud, who was still in a daze, followed some of his comrades out onto the battlefield, which was covered with dead Yankee soldiers. It was obvious from what they saw that the Union army had suffered almost complete annihilation. Some of the Federals died trying to use their comrades’ bodies as shields. What it must have been like to lie in wait while bullets thudded into the bodies of their friends, Bud could only speculate. Besides corpses dressed in blue, some wore Zouave uniforms, while others adorned their trappings with Kelly green. Blue Hugh said they were with the Irish Brigade, because he had heard that they wore green boxwood sprigs in their caps to display their heritage. The barefoot Confederates immediately set to work, relieving the rigid bodies of their footwear and clothing, as well as their haversacks’ contents. Bud replaced his worn-out brogans, which had developed holes in their soles long ago.

Search result for 'army' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 1: Chapter One
39.
"... same thing on their minds as he did. Where is this man leading us? “There should be a well-instructed and disciplined army,” Davis continued, “more numerous than would usually be required on a peace establishment …” Jake and David threw awestruck glances at each other from under ..."
45.
"... adapted to those objects will be required,” said Davis. “Well, I’m jinin’ the navy, then,” Jake proclaimed. “I’m fixin’ to jine the army,” added David. They both snickered at each other and were unable to stop. Afraid that their laughter would spark an outrage, David ..."
"...lower lip to regain his composure, David glanced at him, noticing his father’s lofty stature, and the concerned expression on his clean-shaven face as he listened to the president’s words. Looking back at the dignitaries, he could pay attention only momentarily before his mind drifted again. Instead of the army, he envisioned himself enlisting as a Pony Express rider, even though he knew they only allowed orphans. For a few moments, he imagined riding through the wilderness, alone on horseback across the dusty desert, pursued by marauding Indians. It was a dangerous adventure, just like those in dime novels ..."
68.
"... Mr. Summers.” Hiram nodded thoughtfully. “I’d have to agree with your pa,” he said. “What if everything he says is true?” asked David. “And he asks for volunteers to jine the army?” His father shrugged. “We’ll cross that bridge when we git to it.” “I don’t reckon ..."
119.
"... around the rough-hewn pine table that his father had constructed. “And ole Jeff Davis said somethin’ about bein’ ready by recruitin’ an army,” Hiram was saying. His mother and sisters looked over at David as he entered. “Come sit down and eat your vittles before they git cold,” his ..."
142.
"... a debate. “Governor Moore has authorized establishin’ an army in Alabama,” said Mr. Skidmore, a local resident who was standing near the wood-burning stove in the center of the store with several others. “He’s called for two thousand troops to garrison the coasts.” “Well, now ..."
"...On the following morning, Hiram addressed his family at the dining room table. “I have some news for y’all,” he said, his voice strained with seriousness. “Your ma and I have discussed it, and I’m enlistin’ in the army.” He looked around at his children, who gaped at him. “In fact, I’ve already signed up.” At a loss for elaboration, he fell silent. ..."

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Chapter 2: Chapter Two
8.
"... I’m here to ask him somethin’.” “Oh. What would that be?” “I want to know why he’s runnin’ off to jine the army.” With that, Kit stomped back to his haggard horse, mounted, and rode off. Deciding to follow, David went to the barn to retrieve Sally. He knew he’d be ..."
40.
"... said Hiram with a smile. Bud went on with his news. “I heard tell Colonel Lee resigned from the U.S. army so’s he could fight for Virginee,” he informed Hiram. “He’s married to Mary Custis, you know. She’s the great grand-daughter of Martha Washin’ton.” “Is that a fact?” ..."
"...him that the Yankees could attack and take away everything they owned. His farm might someday look just as derelict. A shiver ran down his spine. He shook it off, thinking his imagination was running away with him. The Yankees come down here? he thought. That’ll never happen. Our army will whip them before they ever git the chance. Jake neared the farmhouse, so David dismounted, all the while teasing his best friend. ..."

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Chapter 3: Chapter Three
8.
"... an ugly fellow, the name didn’t fit. “For the next few days, you will be accountable to me! I am here to make y’all into the finest soldiers our country has to offer! By the time I’m done, y’all will be the best damn fightin’ army there is!” A few of the men clapped, but seeing ..."
"...They managed to put together an interesting concoction of cornbread, wild onions, carrots, and the army’s allotted pork, heated it through, and poured it into their tin cups, making stew. To their gratification, it tasted quite delicious, so much so that Bud bragged to the tent mates next to them. Before they knew it, their comrades were putting their own rations in, and a few ..."
"...armyregiment joined with General Joseph E. Johnston’s army of the Shenandoah, and was attached to Brigadier General Barnard E. Bee’s Third Brigade. For the remainder of the week, the recruits enjoyed their leisurely life, faithfully attended Sunday services, read their prayer books, and learned how to fend for themselves by ..."
100.
"... colonel. By mid-July, the Union army finally began to move, and on Thursday, July 18, the Alabamians received orders to strike tents and cook two days’ rations in preparation for a march. The sick, who were principally suffering from the measles, were left behind in Winchester. While the ..."
"...armyasn’t long before the Yankees came into view: their appearance seemed surreal. The men of the 4th Alabama were confronted with the entire advancing Union army. As they neared, the regiments on either side of the North Alabamians fell away. Colonel Jones ordered his men to hold fast their line ..."
"...armysome reason, the Union army ceased firing at noon. Bracing themselves for another attack, the Rebels utilized the time to check their firearms. Word came that artillery was running low, which caused a slight panic, but Jones assured his men that they could win the battle before their ammunition ran ..."
"...armyr two hours of quiet, the Yankees resumed their assault, and the Confederates fought off several Union advances. Men in colorful garb fashioned after French Algerian Zouaves attacked first, but were driven back. Then came, one at a time, three other regiments, but all eventually broke and ran. Their uniforms ..."
132.
"... he stands like a stone wall! Rally behind the Virginians!” As the regiment moved left, an artillery battery cut through their ranks. Bee and his army veered right, while the rest of the regiment moved forward into the woods. Mayhem prevailed. The men were unable to distinguish friend from ..."

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Chapter 5: Chapter Five
1.
"... Lincoln reportedly said to McClellan, “The supreme command of the army will entail a vast labor upon you,” to which the general replied, “I can do it all.” His pompous, arrogant nature was overlooked, for he was adored by his men, and so he deemed himself worthy of the elevated position. ..."

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Chapter 6: Chapter Six
"...armyweather had been typical, although Hiram, Bud, and the rest of their regiment thought differently, since they were unaccustomed to Virginia’s snowy winters. General Joe Johnston’s army of Northern Virginia established their winter quarters, and the camp sprawled from Fredericksburg southwest into the Shenandoah Valley, with the 4th Alabama constructing ..."
"...Out of sheer boredom, some infantrymen played practical jokes on their comrades. One such fellow, Enoch Campbell, whom Bud and Hiram met upon their arrival into the army, was appointed barber. For his own entertainment, Enoch frequently shaved half of his patrons’ faces before walking off to leave the other half unshaven. A few of the younger, more irresponsible men planted gunpowder near their messmates’ bedrolls, finding great fun in exploding it while their friends lay sleeping, ..."
7.
"... The war started to revive. Robert E. Lee had been defeated at Cheat Mountain, but the Rebels came out victorious at Balls Bluff. Two more states joined the Confederacy—Missouri and Kentucky. By March, Johnston moved his army to the Rappahannock River. The Alabamians were anxious for a fight. ..."
"...General Johnston relocated the 4th Alabama to join with the main army south of the Rappahannock and moved it in the direction of Richmond. In early March, he learned that McClellan was encroaching, so he hastily transferred his troops from Centreville, leaving behind half-cooked food and property belonging to the Confederate army. He moved his men south of the Rappahannock, but ..."
"...David eagerly hovered around Ben Johnson’s in anticipation of incoming telegrams, and while he was there, a courier rode in. According to the messenger, some twenty thousand troops were converging on the area, and the fighting was bloody. Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston had been killed, and the Union army had been chased back to Pittsburg Landing on the Tennessee River. From the looks of things, the Rebels were victorious, according to the dispatch rider, who immediately set off toward Huntsville to retrieve more information. Waving his hat in the air, he let out a whoop and rode away. ..."
27.
"... Yankee soldiers. Ormsby Mitchel’s Union army marched into undefended Huntsville early the following morning. Once David and Jake found out, they couldn’t wait to investigate, and they finally found the opportunity to sneak off early one crisp spring morning a week later. Devising a plan, ..."

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Chapter 7: Chapter Seven
16.
"... else will fall.” Uncontrollably, David shuddered. He glanced around at the solemn, downturned eyes, glad that they didn’t see his involuntary reaction, and wondered if his father’s army was faring any better. Deciding it was time to leave, he bid everyone good-day. On his way out, Kit ..."
"...McClellan’s army occupied Yorktown. Hiram’s regiment was bivouacked among George Washington’s old breastworks, which were still plainly visible. Many expressed pride in fighting for their liberty, just as the patriots of the Revolution had done. Because they were without utensils, the men resorted to cooking “Indian style” by placing dough on ..."
"...Their relatively comfortable existence was soon disrupted, however, because they were ordered to march up the peninsula to Richmond. Before they reached Williamsburg, which was only twelve miles from Yorktown, the 4th Alabama was moved ahead of Johnston’s entire army, along with the Third Brigade, the 18th Georgia, Hampton’s Legion, and General John Bell Hood’s Texans. The troops proceeded to West Point on the York River, but the going was slow because of ankle-deep mud and heavy rain. Exhausted and without rations, the men marched until late into the ..."
"...After a while, the 4th Alabama became restless, with nothing to break up the monotony of their inactivity, except for their artillery, which fired halfheartedly at the Union army’s observation balloon. Hiram’s messmates expressed their discontent about being idle as well, and Blue Hugh complained the most, living up to his nickname. Hiram expected the man’s cynicism to dissipate once spring set in, but instead, Blue Hugh just became more sarcastic. ..."
"...following morning, the Alabamians traveled eight miles to the beat of their drums toward Seven Pines and their foe. The Stars and Bars, St. Andrews Cross, the regimental colors, and the Bonnie Blue Flag all flew gallantly above the advancing Confederates. Once they arrived, they saw that the Union army had been driven out, for all that remained were their empty tents. Throughout the course of the day, the 4th was maneuvered to different locations, but still didn’t see any fighting. By evening, they had been placed on the Richmond and York River railroad tracks. The empty camp was ..."
"...position, the Union soldiers opened fire. The Alabamians were forced to endure an unmerciful bombardment, since no other regiment appeared to support them. While they lay in wait, tolerating the shelling, General Johnston slowly rode up to them. He sat upon his mount, staring off at the advancing Union army. Suddenly, a piece of shell struck him in the shoulder, knocking him off his horse. As rapidly as he had fallen, a group of litter bearers besieged him and carried him off the field. ..."
"...While the hours ticked by, the soldiers grew restless, but knew there was nothing they could do. Early in the afternoon, General Lee arrived. The men soon learned that he had been given control of the Confederate army, and that General Smith was relieved of command. Lee promptly renamed his soldiers. What had previously been known as the “army of the Potomac” became the “army of Northern Virginia.” For his first act of authority, he commanded his troops to “strike the tent,” and returned them to Richmond. ..."
"...sutlers’ wagons and ninety-six bales of cotton that Northern buyers were preparing to ship north. They also made several attacks on the Union garrison at the railroad bridge over Flint River. On one occasion, they killed a Federal soldier and captured another. Annoyed with their constant harassment, the Union army burned the town of Whitesburg to the ground in retribution. Local businessman, “Uncle” Billy Ryan, distributed supplies to Gurley and his men, as well as to needy families in the area. Harper’s Weekly printed a story about General Mitchel’s success in capturing north Alabama down to the Tennessee River, ..."
111.
"... they were unarmed. “We’re here to enlist!” hollered Jake. David glared at him. The picket approached, saw they were harmless, and relaxed his weapon. “You boys want to fight for the Union army?” “Yessir. That’s right,” said Jake. He elbowed his friend, who hesitantly ..."

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Chapter 8: Chapter Eight
"...General McClellan moved his vast army to the south side of the Chickahominy River, in an attempt to confront Lee below Richmond. While he was there, the commander of Robert E. Lee’s Confederate cavalry, General J. E. B. Stuart, received fame by riding around McClellan’s troops. Originally ordered to reconnoiter the army of the Potomac’s ..."
"...Valley to support Stonewall Jackson, while Union General McDowell was ordered to defend Washington against Jackson’s advance. Hiram’s regiment marched 150 miles, and was allowed to rest for only one day during the journey. Eight days later, the men bivouacked near Ashland, twelve miles from Richmond. Circling around McClellan’s army, they were now behind it. The following morning, General Lee pursued the fleeing Federals. ..."
16.
"... On June 29, the Rebels crossed the bridge and followed the retreating Union army to Malvern Hill, where McClellan made a stand. The 4th Alabama was subjected to heavy artillery fire while they supported their batteries, until darkness fell, when they were forced to endure a heavy thunderstorm. ..."
"...nearly every house was a hospital, and every woman served as a nurse. General McClellan retreated to his gunboats on the James River, while General Jackson moved his troops to Harrison’s Landing. They arrived on July 3, and remained there for five more days, until General Lee ordered his army back to Richmond, and restructured it into two corps. The 4th Alabama fell under the command of Generals Lee and Longstreet, and General Jackson led the other corps. General Whiting was transferred, so General Hood took his command. While camped at Richmond, the men acquired new clothing, cooking utensils, ..."
"...The Union army was far superior in numbers and rations, although McClellan had been fooled into thinking otherwise. The Rebels realized that they had an enormous task before them, but they were willing to accept the challenge, because they adored “Bobby” Lee and Colonel Law. Their loyalty ran deep, even though the ..."
"...armyn sympathizers arrived in Decatur and made it their mission to report Rebels who were hiding in the hills. Union Colonel Abel Streight decided to pursue the offenders, so he took a regiment of infantry and one company of cavalry into the mountains to hunt them down. The cavalry was ..."
31.
"... riders came to a stop in front of her. “Ma’am,” one of them said, touching the brim of his kepi, “we’ve been sent to scout the area, and if you have anything the Union army deems necessary, it is our lawful right to confiscate it.” He started to dismount, but she cocked the ..."
"...farm. He waited alone as night fell, watching stars shower overhead in the dark sky, and recalled the same occurrence a year ago, when he and Jake had lounged upon the Kimballs’ veranda, contemplating the war and their trip to Huntsville, where they first caught sight of Wheeler’s Confederate army preparing for war. ..."
"...and the first part of August recuperating. Jackson moved to Gordonsville, where he encountered Pope, and deceived the Union general by lighting numerous fires to make his forces appear larger than they were. This stratagem proved effective, because Pope retreated, but not before Jackson captured a portion of his army. Meanwhile, the 4th Alabama repositioned from Richmond to Gordonsville to support Jackson. After spending three months in Richmond, they were more than happy to be back on the march. Hiram and Bud joked between themselves as they tramped along, while Bo the dog obediently trotted behind Orange Hugh. ..."
"...the Rapidan River toward Culpeper Court House. Pope discovered their advance, so he withdrew across the Rappahannock. Once the Rebels arrived, the people of Culpeper came out to greet them, cheering and waving flags in welcome. Some told horror stories of how they had been abused by Pope’s Union army. Others described how Pope’s own men despised him because of his arrogant, pompous nature, and how Pope’s bombastic braggadocio deflated his troops’ morale. ..."
"...Jackson’s corps crossed the Rappahannock in an attempt to flank the Union army, while General Lee’s portion stayed behind to keep Pope occupied. The Alabamians learned of Jackson’s departure a few days later, but didn’t flinch in their determination. The fact that they were immensely outnumbered didn’t deter them. ..."
"...the Federals’ haste to depart, he was left behind. The Confederates were fed better rations than they had been given since leaving Richmond. Musicians in Hiram’s company, Foggarty, Halsey, and Hickey, celebrated the victory by playing Irish music with instruments they found abandoned on the battlefield by the Union army. That evening, Bud and several others returned to camp. Happy to see that his friend had recovered, Hiram greeted him enthusiastically, and the two exchanged stories of their exploits. ..."
128.
"... the Yankees left Huntsville!” David’s eyes grew wide in amazement. “They did?” “Yessiree. They jist up and left. General Braxton Bragg’s army is gettin’ too close, and they ran ’em off!” “That’s dandy news!” David exclaimed. “Frank Gurley and his Seven Immortals rode ..."

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Chapter 9: Chapter Nine
"...respect the citizens, the Rebels were on their best behavior, and didn’t disturb anything. Upon entering Maryland, they received an icy reception, which was not at all what they had expected. The Marylanders heard from Union sympathizers in Europe that Lee expected to conscript all able-bodied men for his army, and even though that wasn’t the case, their sentiments were equally divided. Hiram overheard a few spectators, who were observing their march from open second-story windows, comment on how they couldn’t distinguish the generals from the enlisted men, because they were all in filthy tatters. General Lee ordered his ..."
"...armyConfederates heard that General Pope had been replaced by none other than McClellan, who had turned his Grand army of the Potomac away from Washington, and was headed back in the direction of Fredericktown. The Alabamians reached Hagerstown, where they awaited news from Jackson. While there, they discovered that the ..."
"...due to a blunder made during the previous week. A copy of Confidential Special Order No. 191, wrapped around three cigars, was discovered by a Union soldier in Fredericktown, and given to General McClellan. The order outlined Lee’s intentions, so McClellan reacted by attempting to cut off the Confederate army, which was scattered from Harpers Ferry to Hagerstown. The Alabamians raced to the aid of General Hill, who was subjected to protecting the gap with his small army until reinforcements arrived. ..."
"...At 3:00 a.m., the men were awakened to the sound of McClellan’s army attacking the Georgians, who had come to their relief the previous night. For an hour and a half, the battle raged, until General Hood was called upon for assistance. He brought his two brigades to the front, one of which included the 4th Alabama. As they were ordered to ..."
"...The Alabamians camped in the valley of the Opequon Creek, where they recuperated from their hard campaign. During their hiatus, the men received letters from home, discovering that ties had been restored, due to the departure of the Union army from north Alabama. They waited in anticipation to hear their names called out by Quartermaster George Washington Jones, and went up to answer the post. Hiram and Bud both received letters, and after reading to themselves, they shared them with one another. ..."
"...General Longstreet was promoted to lieutenant general. A day later, so was General Jackson, and on that same day, General Stuart began his raid into Pennsylvania. The troopers rode up to Chambersburg, where they helped themselves to fresh horses and newly harvested fodder. They continued on around the Union army and returned to Virginia, completing Stuart’s second ride around McClellan. ..."
204.
"... ain’t under Yankee rule. He can’t do nothin’ to me.” Glaring at him, Jake shook his head. “You know he’ll jist lie about bein’ in the Union army. His ma thinks he and Lemuel jined up with ole Braxton Bragg.” “Well, maybe it’s time we set the record straight.” Jake ..."

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Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
"...Antietam as the Yankees were calling it, but because of his displayed abilities at First Manassas. Frustrated that “Little Napoleon” had refused to aggressively pursue and attack the Rebels by inaccurately assuming he was outnumbered, Lincoln was quoted as saying to him, “If you don’t want to use the army, I should like to borrow it for a while.” ..."
"...reflect, he thought back to the previous month’s events. The 4th Alabama had abandoned their encampment for Culpeper Court House, and stayed there until November 22, when Lee discovered that Burnside was headed north from Richmond, so he assembled his troops near the quaint town of Fredericksburg. The Confederate army swelled to almost twice its size, due to returning soldiers who had become ill prior to their march into Maryland. Remaining on the south side of the icy Rappahannock River, the Rebels gazed at the church spires that rose up from the town like bony, skeletal fingers, reaching to ..."
"...On several occasions, Hiram heard music float across the river. The Yankee bands played new songs he had never heard before. One sounded like “John Brown’s Body,” but the words had been changed. This, he learned, was the Union army’s new anthem, “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” He didn’t appreciate the lyrics, since they equated the Confederates to devils, but listened with interest, nonetheless. Another Yankee song they played repetitively was called the “Battle Cry of Freedom.” He liked that one better, but it still didn’t make his ..."
"...At dawn on December 11, the Rebels’ heavy artillery report sounded the alarm: two shots fired in quick succession signaled the Union army’s advance across the river. The 4th fell out and took their position in line. They heard heavy firing down in the town and learned that McLaws’ Division was shooting at the Yankees to prevent them from constructing pontoon bridges. ..."
"...Washington. A wave of cheers rushed over the Rebel ranks. While the rain dissipated to drizzle, Bud, who was still in a daze, followed some of his comrades out onto the battlefield, which was covered with dead Yankee soldiers. It was obvious from what they saw that the Union army had suffered almost complete annihilation. Some of the Federals died trying to use their comrades’ bodies as shields. What it must have been like to lie in wait while bullets thudded into the bodies of their friends, Bud could only speculate. Besides corpses dressed in blue, some wore Zouave ..."

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