A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'artillery' mean?

Find out what artillery means. Artillery is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

artillery

Large caliber firearms, such as cannons. The term also refers to a branch of the military that operates cannon.

References to A Beautiful Glittering Lie are as follows:

(Page 74)
Struggling with their obsolete weapons, the soldiers bit off cartridges and loaded their muskets as rapidly as they could. All the while, Colonel Jones sat calmly atop Old Battalion with one leg draped across the pommel of his saddle, observing the enemy’s movements. Upon his command, the North Alabamians rose, delivered a volley, and after waiting for his signal, fell back upon the cool, damp earth. They were spread from the corn field on their right to a pine woodlot on their left. The men fought on for over an hour with only artillery to support them.

(Page 75)
For some reason, the Union Army ceased firing at noon. Bracing themselves for another attack, the Rebels utilized the time to check their firearms. Word came that artillery was running low, which caused a slight panic, but Jones assured his men that they could win the battle before their ammunition ran out.

(Page 78)
As the regiment moved left, an artillery battery cut through their ranks. Bee and his army veered right, while the rest of the regiment moved forward into the woods.

(Page 82)
Soldiers from other regiments wandered into camp, describing the turmoil that had swirled around them. Brigadier General J.E.B. Stuart, Confederate cavalry commander, had hurled his cavaliers into the New York Zouaves, and as the Yankees retreated, all hell broke loose. Civilians from Washington City had driven over to witness the battle, bringing along their ladies, complete with picnic lunches, parasols, and fine carriages. However, when the Federals “skedaddled,” they almost killed the Washington elite. An artillery shell worsened the situation when it hit a wagon, clogging the road that had been their escape route. Congressman Healy was captured by the Confederates and taken prisoner. The Rebels were calling it the “Bull Run Races.”

(Page 171)
Their comfortable existence was soon disrupted, however, because they were ordered to march up the peninsula to Richmond. Before they reached Williamsburg, which was only twelve miles from Yorktown, the 4th Alabama was moved ahead of Johnston’s entire army, along with the 3rd Brigade, the 18th Georgia, Hampton’s Legion, and General Hood’s Texans. The troops proceeded to West Point on the York River, but the going was slow because of ankle-deep mud and heavy rain. Exhausted and without rations, the men marched until late into the night. When they could go no further, they fell upon the ground to sleep. Hearing artillery fire coming from the direction of Williamsburg, they knew McClellan was hot on their heels, but they had left a surprise for him there – land mines.

(Page 172)
After awhile, the 4th Alabama became restless, with nothing to break up the monotony of their inactivity, except for their artillery firing half-heartedly at the Union army’s observation balloon. Hiram’s messmates expressed their discontent about being idle as well, especially Blue Hugh, who lived up to his nickname. Hiram expected the man’s cynicism to dissipate once spring set in, but instead, Blue Hugh just became more sarcastic.

(Page 195)
They advanced across. The stench of smoke and sulfur rose up to meet them as they fell victim to the waiting Union artillery and small guns. The roar was nearly deafening, and several men fell screaming to their deaths while the regiment progressed. Smoke was so thick and suffocating that the Rebels choked and coughed. They could barely see ten feet in front of them, but they knew they had to persevere. The men advanced to find a brigade of A. P. Hill’s Virginians lying in front of the en-emy’s lines. Hill, in his distinctive red shirt, rode up and down the line, immune to the shelling. Out of ammunition, and too exhausted to move, the Virginians were forced to endure the shower of bullets and shrapnel that hailed down upon them.

(Page 196)
The Confederates jumped into the Union breastworks, stampeding like cattle. In response, the Federals broke and ran as the Alabamians thundered up the ascent to the second line of defense. The Yankees from the first line swept through the second, and all turned tail. The Rebels kept shrieking, cursing, and running in pursuit. They attacked the third line that waited at the top of the hill. The Union soldiers panicked, and fell back, retreating at a run to avoid the charging Confederates, who fired a successful volley into the fleeing enemy. Before the Federals could remove their artillery pieces, the Rebels captured fourteen of them. As the Alabamians watched their enemies escape, their voices rose up in triumphant cheers, which spread through the ranks.

(Pages 197-198)
On the 29th, the Rebels crossed the bridge, and followed the retreating Union army to Malvern Hill, where McClellan made a stand. The 4th Alabama was subjected to heavy artillery fire while they supported their batteries, until darkness fell, when they were forced to endure a heavy thunderstorm.

(Page 198)
In the morning, it was discovered that the Federals had run off, leaving their casualties behind, as well as a few artillery pieces and some small arms. The sounds of thousands of wounded men could be heard wailing, but once the fog lifted, the sight that beheld the Alabamians was nothing less than heartrending. They could see at least five thousand dead or wounded soldiers. A third of the victims lay still in death, but the rest were alive, crawling over the battlefield like maggots on a carcass. Only two men of the 4th Alabama were killed, but thirteen were wounded.

(Page 211)
The Confederates continued to drive the Yankees, until they were within close proximity, while they waited for their artillery to arrive. Once positioned on the field, the cannons exploded into the Union soldiers.

(Page 211)
The men were forced to tolerate heavy artillery fire and skirmishing until 4:00 p.m., when the fighting started in earnest. Hiram knelt to load his musket, stood, and fired on command with his comrades, who were positioned in a line. The veterans continued pouring shot and shell into their foe, some falling randomly to the ground as they were hit. He heard a gun go off behind him, and a man down the line from him fell dead. A group of soldiers behind him started yelling, creating a commotion.

(Page 212)
The effusion of blood raged on. Jackson’s right brigade pressed the Yankees, and managed to capture one of their 3-inch rifles. At six o’clock, a large portion of the enemy’s artillery, as well as their infantry, started up the turnpike toward the Alabamians, who were ordered to charge. The Federals reacted by firing their artillery into the advancing Rebels. Members of Colonel Law’s brigade were blown to pieces, their appendages torn from their torsos, and their broken bodies hurled through the air. Blood splattered down like a rapid downpour, mixed with dirt and shrapnel. Several others were hit by flying metal, and screamed in agony as they writhed to the ground.

(Pages 212-213)
Men of the 4th Alabama ran hunched over, and reached the cover of a hill, where the belching cannons had no effect. Seeing that they were being overtaken, the Yankees fell back, but not before some members of the 4th managed to wrestle a sponge staff from one of the artillery gunners and take his Howitzer. The Alabamians continued pressing the Federals until darkness prevented further pursuit.

(Pages 213-214)
The Federals advanced a column of infantry out from the woods toward Jackson and his men, who lay in wait within a railroad cut. They retaliated by firing into them. The two opposing forces clashed in hand-to-hand combat until the Yankees finally retreated. Pope marched out one column after another, only to have each one repelled. Jackson’s men used all of their ammunition, so they had to fight off the advancing Union soldiers by hurling rocks. The 4th Alabama continued to observe, until they were called upon, along with General Longstreet’s men, to support Jackson. They rushed to his rescue, and the Yankees were finally forced to retreat, leaving their dead and dying on the field. All the while, artillery from both sides continued firing canister and grapeshot. Billowing smoke hung over the infantrymen as opposing sides shot at each other. Like the previous day, the Confederates again drove their enemies until nightfall prevented them.

(Page 224)
Around nine o’clock, the men were moved to outpost duty at a worm-and-hole fence, isolated from the rest of their regiment. Lieutenant Stewart directed them to draw back on their weapons in order to conserve ammunition. The Alabamians did their best to make themselves comfortable, although a drizzle had started, and the constant noise of moving caissons and artillery kept the hungry, exhausted Rebels awake. About an hour later, the sound of tramping boots came toward them. Captain Scruggs, who had replaced Colonel McLemore, gave the order to fire. Every gun exploded in a flash of fire at the same instant. The sounds of retreating footsteps and moaning wounded persisted for several minutes. After awhile, everything grew quiet again. Not even a cricket chirped, which Hiram and Bud agreed was spooky. Hiram sat in silence, straining to hear more Yankees approaching, his heart beating wildly with anticipation, and his breathing erratic.

(Pages 227-228)
Yankee artillery fired into General Hood’s right flank and rear, causing the Rebels to fall back. The ground was scattered with bodies, most of which were clad in blue. Many Confederate soldiers had exhausted their ammunition when Lieutenant Stewart informed that they had been fighting for nearly three hours straight. Fearing that the enemy would chase after them, they quickly reformed, but discovered their haste was unnecessary, as the Yankees failed to respond. The Alabamians took much needed time to replenish their ammunition and catch their breath.

(Page 229)
As artillery blasted away in the distance, Bud and Hiram reflected on the day’s events, sadly conveying their regret for losing such a fine young friend and soldier as Orange Hugh.

(Page 234)
The soldiers were eager to hear news about the war, and of battles that had taken place elsewhere. One such battle, an artillery fight at Little Bear Creek near Tuscumbia, Alabama, took place between Generals Roddey and Sweeny. After Roddey drove the Yankee invaders back to Corinth, Mississippi, he engaged the Federals at Barton Station, where he again drove them back.

(Page 260)
At dawn on December 11, the Rebels’ heavy artillery report sounded the alarm: two shots fired in quick succession signaled the Union army’s advance across the river. The 4th fell out, and took their position in line. They heard heavy firing down in the town, and learned that McLaws’ division was shooting at the Yankees to prevent them from constructing pontoon bridges.

(Pages 261-262)
At ten o’clock, the Yankees started to bombard the town, each of their three hundred and sixty-seven guns firing fifty rounds. From their position, Hiram and his comrades could see Fredericksburg set ablaze. Hysterical citizens ran out into the streets, scattering into the nearby woods. Although the weather was mild for December, Hiram knew that they would likely freeze come nightfall. The thought of those destitute women and children wrenched his heart. After some time, the Confederates’ efforts to repel the Yankees proved futile. The Federals started over the river in boats, and soon began filing across their pontoon bridges. By nightfall, they had taken the town. General Lee arranged his troops, comprised of the brigades of Jackson, Longstreet, A.P. Hill, and McLaws, as well as the divisions led by Taliaferro, D.H. Hill, and Early. Supported by J.E.B. Stuart’s cavalry and John Pelham’s artillery, the men became entrenched at Marye’s Hill. Their lines stretched seven miles, with 11,000 men per mile, or six Confederate soldiers per yard. Over three hundred cannons were poised and ready to fire. The 4th was put into position behind an embankment that afforded them sufficient protection.

(Page 262)
At sunup, the North Alabamians awoke to hear Federal bands playing, and the Union army scuffling about while they moved, but couldn’t see anything, due to heavy fog. The 4th was marched back to their previous position, where they discovered brisk skirmishing and artillery fire taking place. Burnside had begun harassing the Confederates, but was unable to accomplish anything.

(Page 265)
A young artillery officer suddenly rode up on his steed. “Don’t come up here unless you will promise to support me!” he exclaimed.

(Page 273)
It had stopped raining, but bitter cold replaced it. Upon returning to camp, Bud and his comrades learned that they had lost five, with seventeen wounded. Their regiment didn’t fire a single shot. The Yankees, it was estimated, lost over nine thousand after making fourteen assaults that were all beaten back. The men heard of one brave soul, Sergeant Kirkland of South Carolina, who had acquired a reputation as the “Angel of Marye’s Heights” for crossing enemy lines, and benevolently tending to the Union wounded by providing them with blankets and water. John Pelham, an Alabama son who had been in charge of Jackson’s artillery, received praise from General Lee for bravely executing an effective barrage by deceiving the Yankees into thinking his numbers were far greater than they actually were, and holding their lines in the process.

Search result for 'artillery' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 3: Chapter Three
"...his command, the North Alabamians rose to deliver a volley, and after waiting for his signal, fell back upon the cool, damp earth. They were spread from the cornfield on their right to a pine woodlot on their left. The men fought on for over an hour, with only artillery to support them. ..."
"...For some reason, the Union Army ceased firing at noon. Bracing themselves for another attack, the Rebels utilized the time to check their firearms. Word came that artillery was running low, which caused a slight panic, but Jones assured his men that they could win the battle before their ammunition ran out. ..."
132.
"... he stands like a stone wall! Rally behind the Virginians!” As the regiment moved left, an artillery battery cut through their ranks. Bee and his army veered right, while the rest of the regiment moved forward into the woods. Mayhem prevailed. The men were unable to distinguish friend from ..."
"...into the New York Zouaves, and as the Yankees retreated, all hell broke loose. Civilians from Washington City had driven over to witness the battle, bringing along their ladies, complete with picnic lunches, parasols, and fine carriages. However, when the Federals “skedaddled,” they almost killed the Washington elite. An artillery shell worsened the situation when it hit a wagon, clogging the road that had been their escape route. Congressman Healy was captured by the Confederates and taken prisoner. The Rebels were calling it the “Bull Run Races.” ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 7: Chapter Seven
"...Texans. The troops proceeded to West Point on the York River, but the going was slow because of ankle-deep mud and heavy rain. Exhausted and without rations, the men marched until late into the night. When they could go no farther, they fell upon the ground to sleep. Hearing artillery fire coming from the direction of Williamsburg, they knew McClellan was hot on their heels, but they had left a surprise for him there—land mines. ..."
"...After a while, the 4th Alabama became restless, with nothing to break up the monotony of their inactivity, except for their artillery, which fired halfheartedly at the Union army’s observation balloon. Hiram’s messmates expressed their discontent about being idle as well, and Blue Hugh complained the most, living up to his nickname. Hiram expected the man’s cynicism to dissipate once spring set in, but instead, Blue Hugh just became more sarcastic. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 8: Chapter Eight
"...They advanced across. The stench of smoke and sulfur rose up to meet them as they fell victim to the waiting Union artillery and small guns. The roar was nearly deafening, and several men fell screaming to their deaths while the regiment progressed. Smoke was so thick and suffocating that the Rebels choked and coughed. They could barely see ten feet in front of them, but they knew they had to persevere. ..."
"...cursing, and running in pursuit. They attacked the third line that waited at the top of the hill. The Union soldiers panicked and fell back, retreating at a run to avoid the charging Confederates, who fired a successful volley into the fleeing enemy. Before the Federals could remove their artillery pieces, the Rebels captured fourteen of them. As the Alabamians watched their enemies escape, their voices rose up in triumphant cheers, which spread through the ranks. ..."
16.
"... On June 29, the Rebels crossed the bridge and followed the retreating Union army to Malvern Hill, where McClellan made a stand. The 4th Alabama was subjected to heavy artillery fire while they supported their batteries, until darkness fell, when they were forced to endure a heavy thunderstorm. ..."
"...In the morning, it was discovered that the Federals had run off, leaving their casualties behind, as well as a few artillery pieces and some small arms. Wails from thousands of wounded men could be heard, but once the fog lifted, the horrible scene that played out before the Alabamians was nothing less than heartrending. They could see at least five thousand dead or wounded soldiers. A third of the victims ..."
97.
"... sucking on a lemon as he sat atop Little Sorrel. The Confederates continued to drive the Yankees until they were close, and then waited for their artillery to arrive. Once positioned on the field, the cannons exploded into the Union soldiers. The men were forced to tolerate heavy artillery ..."
"...The men were forced to tolerate heavy artillery fire and skirmishing until 4:00 p.m., when the fighting started in earnest. Hiram knelt to load his musket, stood, and fired on command with his comrades, who were positioned in a line. The veterans continued pouring shot and shell into their foe, some falling randomly to the ground as ..."
"...The effusion of blood raged on. Jackson’s right brigade pressed the Yankees, and managed to capture one of their three-inch rifles. At six o’clock, a large portion of the enemy’s artillery, as well as their infantry, started up the turnpike toward the Alabamians, who were ordered to charge. The Federals reacted by firing their artillery into the advancing Rebels. Members of Colonel Law’s brigade were blown to pieces, their appendages torn from their torsos, and their broken bodies hurled through ..."
"...of the 4th Alabama ran hunched over, and reached the cover of a hill, where the belching cannons had no effect. Seeing that they were being overtaken, the Yankees fell back, but not before some members of the 4th managed to wrestle a sponge staff from one of the artillery gunners and take his howitzer. The Alabamians continued pressing the Federals until darkness prevented further pursuit. ..."
"...advancing Union soldiers by hurling rocks. The 4th Alabama continued to observe until they were called upon, along with General Longstreet’s men, to support Jackson. They rushed to his rescue, and the Yankees were finally forced to retreat, leaving their dead and dying on the field. All the while, artillery from both sides continued firing canister and grapeshot. Billowing smoke hung over the infantrymen as opposing sides shot at each other. Like the previous day, the Confederates again drove their enemies, until nightfall hindered them. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 9: Chapter Nine
"...duty at a worm-and-hole fence, isolated from the rest of their regiment. Lieutenant Stewart directed them to draw back on their weapons in order to conserve ammunition. The men did their best to make themselves comfortable, although a drizzle had started, and the constant noise of moving caissons and artillery kept the hungry, exhausted Rebels awake. About an hour later, the sound of tramping boots came toward them. Captain Scruggs, who had replaced Colonel McLemore, gave the order to fire. Every gun exploded in a flash of fire at the same instant. The sounds of retreating footsteps and moaning ..."
"...Yankee artillery fired into General Hood’s right flank and rear, causing the Rebels to fall back. The ground was scattered with bodies, most of which were clad in blue. Many Confederate soldiers had exhausted their ammunition when Lieutenant Stewart informed them that they had been fighting for nearly three hours straight. ..."
63.
"... he saw Bo climb out of a hole from under the church. As artillery blasted away in the distance, Bud and Hiram reflected on the day’s events, sadly conveying their regret for losing such a fine young friend and soldier as Orange Hugh. Intentionally changing the subject, Hiram remarked, ..."
"...The soldiers were eager to hear news about the war, and of battles that had taken place elsewhere. One such battle, an artillery fight at Little Bear Creek near Tuscumbia, Alabama, took place between Generals Roddey and Sweeny. After Roddey drove the Yankee invaders back to Corinth, Mississippi, he engaged the Federals at Barton Station, where he again drove them back. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
"...At dawn on December 11, the Rebels’ heavy artillery report sounded the alarm: two shots fired in quick succession signaled the Union army’s advance across the river. The 4th fell out and took their position in line. They heard heavy firing down in the town and learned that McLaws’ Division was shooting at the Yankees to prevent them ..."
"...bridges. By nightfall, they had taken the town. General Lee arranged his troops, comprised of the brigades of Jackson, Longstreet, A. P. Hill, and McLaws, as well as the divisions led by Taliaferro, D. H. Hill, and Early. Supported by General J. E. B. Stuart’s cavalry and John Pelham’s artillery, the men became entrenched at Marye’s Hill. Their lines stretched seven miles, with eleven thousand men per mile, or six Confederate soldiers per yard. Over three hundred cannons were poised and ready to fire. The 4th was put into position behind an embankment that afforded them sufficient protection. ..."
"...At sunup, the North Alabamians awoke to hear Federal bands playing, and the Union infantrymen scuffling about while they moved, but he couldn’t see anything, due to heavy fog. The 4th marched back to their previous position, where they discovered brisk skirmishing and artillery fire taking place. Burnside had begun harassing the Confederates but was unable to accomplish anything. ..."
132.
"... pieces. All around, bullets whizzed, shells burst, and men yelled and cursed. A young artillery officer suddenly rode up on his steed. “Don’t come up here unless you will promise to support me!” he exclaimed. Bud and Hiram’s comrade, William Caldwell, spoke up. “Go back, Captain, to ..."
"...heard of one brave soul, Sergeant Kirkland of South Carolina, who acquired a reputation as the “Angel of Marye’s Heights” for crossing enemy lines and benevolently tending to the Union wounded by providing them with blankets and water. John Pelham, an Alabama son who was in charge of Jackson’s artillery, received praise from General Lee for bravely executing an effective barrage by deceiving the Yankees into thinking his numbers were far greater than they actually were, and holding their lines in the process. ..."

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"The history is intertwined ingeniously into the plot. It is well plotted and the narrative moves along at nice clip...."

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