A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'butternut' mean?

Find out what butternut means. Butternut is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

butternut

Color used to describe Confederate clothing, which was dyed with butternut leaves and walnut shells to give it a light brown coloration. Also used to describe a Confederate soldier.

Examples of the word "butternut" as it appears in my novel, A Beautiful Glittering Lie, are as follows:

(Pages 222-223)
The firing tapered off, and soon Hiram and his comrades fell asleep. Around midnight, they were ordered to go quietly down the road, one at a time, in an attempt to sneak past the enemy. Carrying Colonel McLemore on a stretcher, they managed to escape, and continued on until they reached the Antietam River near Sharpsburg at noon the next day, where they learned that General Jackson had successfully captured Harpers Ferry, because McClellan was too slow to prevent it. The Alabamians found the opportunity to wash their ragged, butternut clothing, and take much needed baths.

(Page 259)
They waited for Burnside to pounce, but their wait was long-lived, for he hesitated. Since the men were only required to attend dress parade and roll call, they idled away their time by staging snowball fights, some so zealous that several soldiers were wounded, and a few were killed. They also spent time exploring the town, as well as the terrain north of camp. Fredericksburg had been nearly evacuated, except for a few citizens who still remained, their only other option being to camp in the snowy woods until danger passed. On a few rare occasions, the 4th Alabama was detailed to picket duty in town, where they stayed inside deserted homes that housed fine paintings, extensive libraries, and lovely furniture, or they stood guard outside on the piazzas, and in the immaculate, sculptured gardens, gazing across the river at the Union soldiers’ tents. They noticed how finely-outfitted the Yankees were in their splendid blue uniforms, but the Confederates, in contrast, were clothed in ragged, tattered, dingy butternut.

Search result for 'butternut' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 9: Chapter Nine
"...stretcher, they managed to escape, and continued on until they reached the Antietam River near Sharpsburg at noon the next day, where they learned that General Jackson had successfully captured Harpers Ferry because McClellan was too slow to prevent it. The Alabamians found the opportunity to wash their ragged butternut clothing and take much-needed baths. ..."

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Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
"...lovely furniture, or they stood guard outside on the piazzas, and in the immaculate sculptured gardens, gazing across the river at the Union soldiers’ tents. They noticed how finely outfitted the Yankees were in their splendid blue uniforms, but the Confederates, in contrast, were clothed in ragged, tattered, dingy butternut. ..."

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