A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'cavalry' mean?

Find out what cavalry means. Cavalry is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

cavalry

A branch of the military that was mounted on horseback. During the Civil War, cavalry units were used to scout out enemy movements, and were relied upon to move swiftly from one place to another. The cavalry usually fought on foot. During the first half of the war, the Confederate cavalry was far superior to their Union counterparts. In my novel, A Beautiful Glittering Lie, the cavalry is referred to in the following ways:

(Pages 35-36)
Soldiers from other regiments wandered into camp, describing the turmoil that had swirled around them. Brigadier General J. E. B. Stuart, Confederate cavalry commander, had hurled his cavaliers into the New York Zouaves, and as the Yankees retreated, all hell broke loose. Civilians from Washington City had driven over to witness the battle, bringing along their ladies, complete with picnic lunches, parasols, and fine carriages. However, when the Federals “skedaddled,” they almost killed the Washington elite. An artillery shell worsened the situation when it hit a wagon, clogging the road that had been their escape route. Congressman Healy was captured by the Confederates and taken prisoner. The Rebels were calling it the “Bull Run Races.”

(Page 43)
On October 7, state leaders announced that Alabama had supplied twenty-seven thousand troops to the Confederacy thus far. This included sixty infantry regiments, thirteen cavalry regiments, six battalions, and twenty batteries. The war was ramping up, that much was certain.

(Page 65)
“Captain Frank Gurley and his band of cavalrymen have been tormentin’ General Mitchel for weeks,” stated Mr. Foreman as he casually lit his pipe. “They cut telegraph lines, fired into departin’ trains, and tore up railroad tracks. So in return, Mitchel arrested twelve of Huntsville’s most prominent citizens, jist last week.”

(Page 68)
As summer approached, David learned of events that ignited the region. Frank Gurley and his cavalrymen, who were being referred to as his “Seven Immortals,” became more active in their attempts to aggravate General Mitchel in Huntsville. At McDavid’s Mill, they captured four sutlers’ wagons and ninety-six bales of cotton that Northern buyers were preparing to ship north. They also made several attacks on the Union garrison at the railroad bridge over Flint River. On one occasion, they killed a Federal soldier and captured another. Annoyed with their constant harassment, the Union army burned the town of Whitesburg to the ground in retribution. Local businessman, “Uncle” Billy Ryan, distributed supplies to Gurley and his men, as well as to needy families in the area. Harper’s Weekly printed a story about General Mitchel’s success in capturing north Alabama down to the Tennessee River, which included Huntsville. The article, embellished with a beautiful painting of the town, enraged David when he saw it.

(Page 71)
“We’re tellin’ the truth,” insisted Jake. “We intend to jine the cavalry, and capture Captain Gurley.”

(Page 74)
General McClellan moved his vast army to the south side of the Chickahominy River, in an attempt to confront Lee below Richmond. While he was there, the commander of Robert E. Lee’s Confederate cavalry, General J. E. B. Stuart, received fame by riding around McClellan’s troops. Originally ordered to reconnoiter the Army of the Potomac’s movements, Stuart and his cavaliers decided to risk their lives by going around, instead of returning to Richmond the way they had come, and their successful exploit awarded them the capture of 170 prisoners and 300 horses and mules. According to one report, the cavaliers slowed down only to accept bouquets and kisses from admiring women.

(Page 76)
Union sympathizers arrived in Decatur and made it their mission to report Rebels who were hiding in the hills. Union Colonel Abel Streight decided to pursue the offenders, so he took a regiment of infantry and one company of cavalry into the mountains to hunt them down. The cavalry was attacked by Confederate scouts, so they returned to Decatur, but the infantry was successful in capturing the fugitives, and forced them to enlist with the 1st Alabama Cavalry. On July 10, they were inducted into the Union Army.

(Page 78)
The following afternoon, just as he was about to conclude that it was safe to bring his family home, a band of Union cavalrymen thundered up the lane. Hearing the horses’ pounding hooves announce their arrival, he hid in the safety of the trees, watching and waiting while he held his breath in anticipation. The men dismounted. They walked into the house and around the premises. To his amazement, they mounted back up and rode off. His plan had worked.

(Page 79)
“Yup. Billy Ryan says he was in a runnin’ fight with a large force of Yankee cavalry and got caught. They arrested him for the murder of that Yankee general, McCook, even though his death was an accident.”

(Page 98)
At ten o’clock, the Yankees started to bombard the town, each of their 367 guns firing fifty rounds. From their position, Hiram and his comrades could see Fredericksburg set ablaze. Hysterical citizens ran out into the streets, scattering into the nearby woods. Although the weather was mild for December, Hiram knew that they would likely freeze come nightfall. The thought of those destitute women and children wrenched his heart. After some time, the Confederates’ efforts to repel the Yankees proved futile. The Federals started over the river in boats and soon began filing across their pontoon bridges. By nightfall, they had taken the town. General Lee arranged his troops, comprised of the brigades of Jackson, Longstreet, A. P. Hill, and McLaws, as well as the divisions led by Taliaferro, D. H. Hill, and Early. Supported by General J. E. B. Stuart’s cavalry and John Pelham’s artillery, the men became entrenched at Marye’s Hill. Their lines stretched seven miles, with eleven thousand men per mile, or six Confederate soldiers per yard. Over three hundred cannons were poised and ready to fire. The 4th was put into position behind an embankment that afforded them sufficient protection.

Search result for 'cavalry' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 3: Chapter Three
"...Soldiers from other regiments wandered into camp, describing the turmoil that had swirled around them. Brigadier General J. E. B. Stuart, Confederate cavalry commander, had hurled his cavaliers into the New York Zouaves, and as the Yankees retreated, all hell broke loose. Civilians from Washington City had driven over to witness the battle, bringing along their ladies, complete with picnic lunches, parasols, and fine carriages. However, when the Federals “skedaddled,” they almost ..."

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Chapter 4: Chapter Four
155.
"... On October 7, state leaders announced that Alabama had supplied twenty-seven thousand troops to the Confederacy thus far. This included sixty infantry regiments, thirteen cavalry regiments, six battalions, and twenty batteries. The war was ramping up, that much was certain. Caroline ..."

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Chapter 7: Chapter Seven
"...“Captain Frank Gurley and his band of cavalrymen have been tormentin’ General Mitchel for weeks,” stated Mr. Foreman as he casually lit his pipe. “They cut telegraph lines, fired into departin’ trains, and tore up railroad tracks. So in return, Mitchel arrested twelve of Huntsville’s most prominent citizens, jist last week.” ..."
"...As summer approached, David learned of events that ignited the region. Frank Gurley and his cavalrymen, who were being referred to as his “Seven Immortals,” became more active in their attempts to aggravate General Mitchel in Huntsville. At McDavid’s Mill, they captured four sutlers’ wagons and ninety-six bales of cotton that Northern buyers were preparing to ship north. They also made several attacks on the ..."
118.
"... picket stared at them. He pushed his kepi back on his head. “Humbug,” he muttered. “We’re tellin’ the truth,” insisted Jake. “We intend to jine the cavalry, and capture Captain Gurley.” The boys could see now that the picket wasn’t too bright. He seemed to have difficulty ..."

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Chapter 8: Chapter Eight
"...General McClellan moved his vast army to the south side of the Chickahominy River, in an attempt to confront Lee below Richmond. While he was there, the commander of Robert E. Lee’s Confederate cavalry, General J. E. B. Stuart, received fame by riding around McClellan’s troops. Originally ordered to reconnoiter the Army of the Potomac’s movements, Stuart and his cavaliers decided to risk their lives by going around, instead of returning to Richmond the way they had come, and their successful exploit awarded ..."
"...Union sympathizers arrived in Decatur and made it their mission to report Rebels who were hiding in the hills. Union Colonel Abel Streight decided to pursue the offenders, so he took a regiment of infantry and one company of cavalry into the mountains to hunt them down. The cavalry was attacked by Confederate scouts, so they returned to Decatur, but the infantry was successful in capturing the fugitives, and forced them to enlist with the 1st Alabama cavalry. On July 10, they were inducted into the Union Army. ..."
"...The following afternoon, just as he was about to conclude that it was safe to bring his family home, a band of Union cavalrymen thundered up the lane. Hearing the horses’ pounding hooves announce their arrival, he hid in the safety of the trees, watching and waiting while he held his breath in anticipation. The men dismounted. They walked into the house and around the premises. To his amazement, they mounted back up ..."
74.
"... responded Ben Johnson in alarm. “Yup. Billy Ryan says he was in a runnin’ fight with a large force of Yankee cavalry and got caught. They arrested him for the murder of that Yankee general, McCook, even though his death was an accident.” “Is that a fact?” asked Mr. ..."

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Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
"...filing across their pontoon bridges. By nightfall, they had taken the town. General Lee arranged his troops, comprised of the brigades of Jackson, Longstreet, A. P. Hill, and McLaws, as well as the divisions led by Taliaferro, D. H. Hill, and Early. Supported by General J. E. B. Stuart’s cavalry and John Pelham’s artillery, the men became entrenched at Marye’s Hill. Their lines stretched seven miles, with eleven thousand men per mile, or six Confederate soldiers per yard. Over three hundred cannons were poised and ready to fire. The 4th was put into position behind an embankment that afforded ..."

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