A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'charge' mean?

Find out what charge means. Charge is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

charge

To run at the enemy. In my novel, A Beautiful Glittering Lie, the term "charge" is used as follows:

(Page 75)
“Forward, boys! Charge them!” their commander, Colonel Law, encouraged.

(Page 75)
The 4th Alabama responded, as if they were in a dress parade, until they passed the Virginians. Given the command, the Rebels charged, bounding toward their foe with a shrill, screeching yell.

(Page 75)
Caught in the whirlwind, Hiram charged fearlessly. Men dropped around him like flies, the thud of bullets sinking into them before their bodies exploded with blood. The Alabamians kept running until they reached a ravine and the waiting line of Federals, oblivious to the death that surrounded them while bullets whistled and whizzed by. Colonel McLemore fell wounded, and was quickly replaced by Captain Scruggs.

(Page 79)
Two days later, the Rebels continued their pursuit of the Federals. They reached the Rappahannock, and moved upriver under constant shelling from their adversaries. The 4th Alabama was ordered to the front of the advancing Confederates. They charged, driving the Yankees into the river. As a result, many who couldn’t swim drowned, while others were killed or captured.

(Page 80)
The effusion of blood raged on. Jackson’s right brigade pressed the Yankees, and managed to capture one of their three-inch rifles. At six o’clock, a large portion of the enemy’s artillery, as well as their infantry, started up the turnpike toward the Alabamians, who were ordered to charge. The Federals reacted by firing their artillery into the advancing Rebels. Members of Colonel Law’s brigade were blown to pieces, their appendages torn from their torsos, and their broken bodies hurled through the air. Blood splattered down like a rapid downpour, mixed with dirt and shrapnel. Several others were hit by flying metal, and screamed in agony as they writhed to the ground.

(Page 84)
After struggling through a fourteen-mile march, the Alabamians arrived between three and four o’clock that afternoon, exhausted from their strenuous excursion over the mountain. The 4th was immediately put into action, commanded to attack the enemy to the left of the road with fixed bayonets. They were then ordered to their right. The men charged through an apple orchard overladen with fruit. Starving, yet unable to pick any because time wouldn’t allow for it, they forged ahead with the Texans and the rest of Colonel Law’s Third Brigade. Night fell before they could reach their opponents, so they positioned themselves in a sunken road for protection. The enemy continued firing into laurel trees which stood several yards away, but to no avail, for the pelting of their bullets whacked into the trunks. At one point, Colonel McLemore climbed up on a nearby wooden rail fence to reconnoiter, but he was hit in the shoulder.

Search result for 'charge' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 8: Chapter Eight
7.
"... hesitated upon seeing the open field that they were expected to cross in order to reach the Virginians. “Forward, boys! charge them!” their commander, Colonel Law, encouraged. They advanced across. The stench of smoke and sulfur rose up to meet them as they fell victim to the waiting ..."
10.
"... One, two, three, four! One, two, three, four!” The 4th Alabama responded, as if they were in a dress parade, until they passed the Virginians. Given the command, the Rebels charged, bounding toward their foe with a shrill, screeching yell. Caught in the whirlwind, Hiram charged fearlessly. ..."
"...Caught in the whirlwind, Hiram charged fearlessly. Men dropped around him like flies, the thud of bullets sinking into them before their bodies exploded with blood. The Alabamians kept running until they reached a ravine and the waiting line of Federals, oblivious to the death that surrounded them while bullets whistled and whizzed by. Colonel ..."
"...in Congress, Lincoln took the liberty of having the railroad built through Northern states, thus accentuating their economic prosperity. Once word spread to Ben Johnson’s mercantile, the men who frequented the establishment were, of course, outraged. But one bright spot appeared: General Mitchel was recalled from Huntsville to Washington, charged with failing in his duty to repress pillaging and plundering, and for allowing illegal shipments of cotton to be sent north. ..."
"...Two days later, the Rebels continued their pursuit of the Federals. They reached the Rappahannock, and moved upriver under constant shelling from their adversaries. The 4th Alabama was ordered to the front of the advancing Confederates. They charged, driving the Yankees into the river. As a result, many who couldn’t swim drowned, while others were killed or captured. ..."
"...The effusion of blood raged on. Jackson’s right brigade pressed the Yankees, and managed to capture one of their three-inch rifles. At six o’clock, a large portion of the enemy’s artillery, as well as their infantry, started up the turnpike toward the Alabamians, who were ordered to charge. The Federals reacted by firing their artillery into the advancing Rebels. Members of Colonel Law’s brigade were blown to pieces, their appendages torn from their torsos, and their broken bodies hurled through the air. Blood splattered down like a rapid downpour, mixed with dirt and shrapnel. Several others were ..."

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Chapter 9: Chapter Nine
"...march, the Alabamians arrived between three and four o’clock that afternoon, exhausted from their strenuous excursion over the mountain. The 4th was immediately put into action, commanded to attack the enemy to the left of the road with fixed bayonets. They were then ordered to their right. The men charged through an apple orchard overladen with fruit. Starving, yet unable to pick any because time wouldn’t allow for it, they forged ahead with the Texans and the rest of Colonel Law’s Third Brigade. Night fell before they could reach their opponents, so they positioned themselves in a sunken road ..."

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Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
"...back. The men heard of one brave soul, Sergeant Kirkland of South Carolina, who acquired a reputation as the “Angel of Marye’s Heights” for crossing enemy lines and benevolently tending to the Union wounded by providing them with blankets and water. John Pelham, an Alabama son who was in charge of Jackson’s artillery, received praise from General Lee for bravely executing an effective barrage by deceiving the Yankees into thinking his numbers were far greater than they actually were, and holding their lines in the process. ..."

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