A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'company' mean?

Find out what company means. Company is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

company

A group of 50 to 100 soldiers who are led by a captain.

10 companies = 1 regiment
4+ regiments = 1 brigade
2-5 brigades = 1 division
2+ divisions = 1 corps
1+ corps = 1 army

In my novel, A Beautiful Glittering Lie, the use of the word "company" in reference to an army is used as follows:

(Page 14)
On March 27, the Huntsville Democrat reported that a company known as the Madison Rifles was being called into service, and a few days later, so were the Huntsville Guards under Captain Egbert Jones. Alabama was preparing for war, and things were heating up. The entire Southern nation was up in arms, waiting for a reason to fight.

(Page 19)
Five days later, Hiram was requested to attend a flag presentation with the rest of the newly enlisted North Alabamians, Company I. The Southern Advocate described the festivities that had transpired the evening before, when the Huntsville Guards were presented with their flag, which rivaled that of another new company, the Madison Rifles. According to the newspaper article, Miss Sallie McKie presented the silk flag to Lieutenant Gus Mastin, who in return gave a “strong, manly, and striking address, which was in good taste and well received.”

(Page 19)
Arriving at the Huntsville Female College with Bud and his wife, Hiram and his family entered. College students escorted them to a gala dinner being held in their honor. David sat quietly watching the guests and their soldiers, men of the recently created Company I. Some he was already acquainted with. He knew William Caldwell, because he had gone to school with his son, Tom. He had also met Matthew Curry, a farmer from neighboring Lawrence County, and two other young enlistees who were barely older than he was, cousins by the names of James Alexander and William Rivers. Taking note of their excitement and anticipation, he wished to be a part of it, but he had made his father a promise, which he fully intended to honor, so he ate without speaking, and swallowed his disappointment.

(Page 19)
After the banquet, a ceremony commenced, beginning with a patriotic oration given by one of the officers. A banner sewn by the Ladies Aid Society in Huntsville was presented to the new company by Miss Carrie Gordon, who was appropriately dressed in Southern homespun. It was accepted by Private E. S. McClung, the color sergeant, who advanced with his corporals and gave a stirring speech.

(Page 20)
Binford, Slaughter & Co., the Huntsville druggists, bestowed a fully stocked medical chest to the company, and the citizens of Huntsville donated one thousand dollars. Professor Hermann Saroni sang “To Arms Ye Braves.” Afterward, the pastor from the First Presbyterian Church offered up a short, reverent prayer. “Dear Lord,” he began, “please do all you can to preserve these young men in their pursuit of securin’ our freedom from the tyranny that threatens to disempower us, and keep them from harm’s way. Let them walk in the path of righteousness, and never waver from your truth and light. Theirs is the banner of glory, given to them this day that they might virtuously protect us in their quest. May you bring health, safety, and well bein’ to each and every one of these fine soldiers. It is in your name we pray.”

(Page 20)
Following the ceremony, each officer was given a bouquet of flowers, and to each enlistee, a newly constructed Confederate uniform was distributed. The jackets were gray homespun wool with a row of nine shiny brass buttons down the front. Kepis were allotted as headwear, and brogans for footwear. Every man was instructed to bring his own firearm and ammunition if possible, as well as knives and hygienic items. The pastor dispersed small Testaments, blessing each soldier while he went down the line, and telling them that they were expected to learn not only duty to their country, but also how to fight the great moral battle of life. The recruits were then ordered to return the following Monday to the Huntsville Depot for departure. Before the evening’s festivities ended, members of the new company exchanged vows with each other, stating that they would protect one another like brethren “to the death.”

(Page 20)
Once they arrived home, Hiram tended to last-minute chores he needed to complete before he departed with his company. David joined him in the barnyard and helped feed the livestock. They spent the remainder of the day repairing fences and finishing up with the planting. When they were finished, they went to the summer kitchen, where Caroline had supper waiting for them.

(Page 28)
The train embarked on a long ride through pine-covered countryside. After two days of rugged riding, the North Alabamians reached Dalton on May 2. They were the last company from Alabama to arrive. Once the recruits were out of the cars, their respective sergeants began calling roll, and the men responded to their names, after which they were assigned tent partners. Each soldier was given half a small white tent, and taught how to combine the two pieces in order to provide shelter. After they had built their temporary homes, they stood in line again to receive rations, and were served breakfast on tin plates that they were instructed to keep, as well as tin cups. They indulged in cornbread, steak, fried potatoes, eggs, and coffee, all provided by the local townsfolk. Upon finishing their meal, they lined up to receive additional provisions, including haversacks, gum cloths, canteens, blankets, and roll straps. Smooth-bored muskets were distributed to those without their own guns, to which the men grunted, knowing the weapons were relics. Some of the soldiers who had brought along extra money purchased additional accoutrements from the commissary, but they soon found out that the items were significantly overpriced, so most did without.

(Page 28)
Evander McIvor Law of Florence was unanimously chosen as lieutenant colonel on the first ballot. Law was considered an accomplished officer, despite his lack of combat experience and field command. He was of slight build, with a goatee covering his twenty-six-year-old face, thus concealing his youthful appearance. On the second ballot, Charles Lewis Scott was elected major. He had been a two-term congressman from California at the onset of the war, at which time he returned to Alabama to defend his native state. Edward Dorr Tracy, a Georgia-born lawyer, was elected as captain for the North Alabamians, the company he had created. Tracy’s law partner, David C. Humphreys, was considered to be a Douglas Democrat who had staunchly opposed secession, but once the war became certain, he enlisted in his colleague’s company as a private. He was an experienced military man, having previously served as a militia colonel.

(Page 30)
One young lady called out to the men in Hiram’s company as they marched by. “Where are y’all from?”

(Page 31)
Soon, their situation drastically changed, as more drills and fatigue details were continually expected of them. The men were driven through a gauntlet of routines. Following reveille at 4:00 a.m., they were drilled as an entire regiment from 4:30 until 7:00 a.m., when they broke for breakfast. General inspection was at 8:00 a.m., and the company drill lasted from 9:00 until noon. After midday break, another drill session commenced, lasting from 2:30 until 5:30. A dress parade immediately followed. Supper was served at 6:30, roll call was at 9:00, and tattoo was at 9:30, when all lights were extinguished. Most drill sessions were led by Colonel Jones’ protégé, Private Humphreys.

(Page 39)
“James Alexander was killed,” she said. “You remember him, don’t you? Him and his cousin jined up together with your pa’s company.”

(Page 43)
The mourners made their way through town to the Court House Green, where a funeral ceremony commenced. The coffin was carried across the lawn and set before a platform that had been erected for the clergy, who spoke to the audience of nearly twenty-five thousand. Once the service ended, the procession continued on to the city cemetery, where the celebrated colonel was laid to rest beside his deceased wife, fulfilling a request he had expressed as a premonition of his death. A wailing dirge played, three shots were fired by a newly formed company, the Huntsville Greys, the grave was filled up, and the congregation dispersed.

(Page 54)
“My younger cousin, Henry, is first lieutenant of Company H, which has been organized right here in Morgan County,” Joseph Ryan proclaimed. “Soon as they git to Tennessee, they’ll whip ole U. S., and send him back up North where he belongs!”

(Page 59)
Hiram’s regiment, which was camped at Yorktown, reorganized on April 21, due to the fact that the one-year commitment many soldiers gave upon their enlistment expired. William Rivers, whose cousin, James Alexander, had been killed at Manassas, opted to resign his position. He was so heartbroken over the loss of his cousin that he deemed himself worthless as a fighting soldier, and so, after bidding his company farewell, he departed for home with several others.

(Page 63)
David led the way this time. They dodged between buildings, scurrying to get ahead of the company until they reached the end of the block, where they peered around the corner of another building. The soldiers marched toward them. Their boots thudded in time on the dirt road, stirring up a small cloud of dust.

(Page 63)
The company marched off down the road until they were gone from sight.

(Pages 65-66)
The following morning, they learned that a regiment of Union soldiers had gotten ahead of them in an attempt to cut them off. General Whiting, the brigade commander, galloped past them on his steed, his hands clasped and his face raised to the sky in prayer while he rode to the front. Later on in the day, General Hood managed to push the Yankees back, prompting some of the men to comment on how General Whiting’s prayers had been answered. One of the North Alabamians, Orderly Sergeant Hartley, and a private from Company A, were sent out as scouts later that evening, but when morning came, only the private returned. Sergeant Hartley had been shot, and the private brought back his bullet-pierced roll book to prove it. Hiram and the rest of Company I once again felt sorrow, for although Hartley had been from Connecticut, he was well liked, and a true Confederate patriot.

(Page 67)
On the evening of May 30, Hiram’s regiment was ordered to march a few miles east of Richmond, where they bivouacked in a grove of oak trees. The men of Company G, the Marion Light Infantry, stacked their guns against one of the oaks, and went to sleep beneath it. During the night, a terrible electrical storm blew in. A bolt of lightning hit the tree, destroyed the guns, killed one soldier, and injured forty-six others. The 4th Alabama expressed sadness for losing their comrades before they were ordered to march. Hiram wondered if such a great loss was a terrible indication of what was to come, but he kept his daunting thoughts to himself.

(Page 75)
The Alabamians heard heavy fighting ahead, and knew they were headed for a hornets’ nest. They passed General Porter’s abandoned camp. Everything was still intact, including tents, officers’ tables, and chairs, appearing as though the Federals intended to return once the threat had passed. General Porter, it was learned, fell back to Gaines Farm, which was about a mile from Cold Harbor. Before the 4th reached the firing line, Captain Robbins of Company G requested the men to kneel. He then delivered a heartfelt prayer.

(Page 75)
It was discovered the following day that the 4th Alabama lost twenty-three, including Captain Armistead and Captain Price, and 109 were either wounded or missing. Jim Harrison of Company D received admiration for his ability to capture twenty-three men and an officer. In the excitement of battle, he had unintentionally jumped into a trench filled with Federals, so he shot one and took the rest prisoner. Among the Yankees captured by the Confederates was Colonel McLemore’s old regiment, the 8th U.S. Infantry, which he had resigned from at the onset of the war.

(Page 76)
Union sympathizers arrived in Decatur and made it their mission to report Rebels who were hiding in the hills. Union Colonel Abel Streight decided to pursue the offenders, so he took a regiment of infantry and one company of cavalry into the mountains to hunt them down. The cavalry was attacked by Confederate scouts, so they returned to Decatur, but the infantry was successful in capturing the fugitives, and forced them to enlist with the 1st Alabama Cavalry. On July 10, they were inducted into the Union Army.

(Page 81)
Later in the day, a soldier from Company A returned to camp, explaining that he had been captured by Sigel’s Dutch, who were really Germans, but in the Federals’ haste to depart, he was left behind. The Confederates were fed better rations than they had been given since leaving Richmond. Musicians in Hiram’s company, Foggarty, Halsey, and Hickey, celebrated the victory by playing Irish music with instruments they found abandoned on the battlefield by the Union army. That evening, Bud and several others returned to camp. Happy to see that his friend had recovered, Hiram greeted him enthusiastically, and the two exchanged stories of their exploits.

(Page 99)
The Alabamians ran behind the hill, dropping down as Company D was sent to the front. Immediately, they were engaged in heavy skirmishing. Bud and Hiram glanced over at each other, waiting in suspense for their line to be attacked. However, darkness soon fell, and the day’s fighting ended. Stray bullets flew over the hill sporadically. While the men lay sleeping, William Caldwell, who was on his back, suddenly rolled over, blood spewing from his mouth. As quickly as the men realized he had been hit, William died. They had little time to do anything but helplessly watch.

(Page 100)
He staggered toward his company. Sinking down onto his knees, he burst into uncontrollable sobs. Enoch Campbell came to his aid, and assisted him back behind the breastworks.

Search result for 'company' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 1: Chapter One
"...For the rest of the afternoon and into the evening, the family enjoyed each other’s company. Mr. Kimball apologized that his wife couldn’t be there, for she was required to stay home, due to a sprained ankle. His faithful slaves, Percy and Isabelle, were looking after her. They were newlyweds, and seemed happy to oblige. Therefore, Mr. Kimball brought his son down to see Jake’s ..."
"...On March 27, the Huntsville Democrat reported that a company known as the Madison Rifles was being called into service, and a few days later, so were the Huntsville Guards under Captain Egbert Jones. Alabama was preparing for war, and things were heating up. The entire Southern nation was up in arms, waiting for a reason to fight. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 2: Chapter Two
"...Five days later, Hiram was requested to attend a flag presentation with the rest of the newly enlisted North Alabamians, company I. The Southern Advocate described the festivities that had transpired the evening before, when the Huntsville Guards were presented with their flag, which rivaled that of another new company, the Madison Rifles. According to the newspaper article, Miss Sallie McKie presented the silk flag to Lieutenant Gus Mastin, who in return gave a “strong, manly, and striking address, which was in good taste and well received.” ..."
"...companyg at the Huntsville Female College with Bud and his wife, Hiram and his family entered. College students escorted them to a gala dinner being held in their honor. David sat quietly watching the guests and their soldiers, men of the recently created company I. Some he was already acquainted ..."
"...After the banquet, a ceremony commenced, beginning with a patriotic oration given by one of the officers. A banner sewn by the Ladies Aid Society in Huntsville was presented to the new company by Miss Carrie Gordon, who was appropriately dressed in Southern homespun. It was accepted by Private E. S. McClung, the color sergeant, who advanced with his corporals and gave a stirring speech. ..."
"...Binford, Slaughter & Co., the Huntsville druggists, bestowed a fully stocked medical chest to the company, and the citizens of Huntsville donated one thousand dollars. Professor Hermann Saroni sang “To Arms Ye Braves.” Afterward, the pastor from the First Presbyterian Church offered up a short, reverent prayer. “Dear Lord,” he began, “please do all you can to preserve these young men in their pursuit of ..."
"...them that they were expected to learn not only duty to their country, but also how to fight the great moral battle of life. The recruits were then ordered to return the following Monday to the Huntsville Depot for departure. Before the evening’s festivities ended, members of the new company exchanged vows with each other, stating that they would protect one another like brethren “to the death.” ..."
"...Once they arrived home, Hiram tended to last-minute chores he needed to complete before he departed with his company. David joined him in the barnyard and helped feed the livestock. They spent the remainder of the day repairing fences and finishing up with the planting. When they were finished, they went to the summer kitchen, where Caroline had supper waiting for them. ..."
109.
"... It should only be your kin.” David grunted. He was hoping his friend would accompany him for moral support, but perhaps Jake had a point. “Yeah, reckon you’re right,” he concurred. “Besides, Kit Lawrence might be there, and I know you don’t like him.” Jake simpered. “It ain’t ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 3: Chapter Three
"...The train embarked on a long ride through pine-covered countryside. After two days of rugged riding, the North Alabamians reached Dalton on May 2. They were the last company from Alabama to arrive. Once the recruits were out of the cars, their respective sergeants began calling roll, and the men responded to their names, after which they were assigned tent partners. Each soldier was given half a small white tent, and taught how to combine the two pieces ..."
"...second ballot, Charles Lewis Scott was elected major. He had been a two-term congressman from California at the onset of the war, at which time he returned to Alabama to defend his native state. Edward Dorr Tracy, a Georgia-born lawyer, was elected as captain for the North Alabamians, the company he had created. Tracy’s law partner, David C. Humphreys, was considered to be a Douglas Democrat who had staunchly opposed secession, but once the war became certain, he enlisted in his colleague’s company as a private. He was an experienced military man, having previously served as a militia colonel. ..."
61.
"... resembled fluttering butterflies, and cheered the soldiers, who tiredly marched through town. One young lady called out to the men in Hiram’s company as they marched by. “Where are y’all from?” William Rivers responded, “Alabama’s sons come to fight for Virginia’s ..."
"...more drills and fatigue details were continually expected of them. The men were driven through a gauntlet of routines. Following reveille at 4:00 a.m., they were drilled as an entire regiment from 4:30 until 7:00 a.m., when they broke for breakfast. General inspection was at 8:00 a.m., and the company drill lasted from 9:00 until noon. After midday break, another drill session commenced, lasting from 2:30 until 5:30. A dress parade immediately followed. Supper was served at 6:30, roll call was at 9:00, and tattoo was at 9:30, when all lights were extinguished. Most drill sessions were led by ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 4: Chapter Four
45.
"... I learned some terrible news today.” He glared at her. “What, Ma?” “James Alexander was killed,” she said. “You remember him, don’t you? Him and his cousin jined up together with your pa’s company.” “Yes’m, I remember.” He sat contemplating momentarily. “That’s ..."
"...thousand. Once the service ended, the procession continued on to the city cemetery, where the celebrated colonel was laid to rest beside his deceased wife, fulfilling a request he had expressed as a premonition of his death. A wailing dirge played, three shots were fired by a newly formed company, the Huntsville Greys, the grave was filled up, and the congregation dispersed. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 5: Chapter Five
187.
"... Grant for short.” “My younger cousin, Henry, is first lieutenant of company H, which has been organized right here in Morgan County,” Joseph Ryan proclaimed. “Soon as they git to Tennessee, they’ll whip ole U. S., and send him back up North where he belongs!” David pondered Mr. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 6: Chapter Six
"...one-year commitment many soldiers gave upon their enlistment expired. William Rivers, whose cousin, James Alexander, had been killed at Manassas, opted to resign his position. He was so heartbroken over the loss of his cousin that he deemed himself worthless as a fighting soldier, and so, after bidding his company farewell, he departed for home with several others. ..."
"...David led the way this time. They dodged between buildings, scurrying to get ahead of the company until they reached the end of the block, where they peered around the corner of another building. The soldiers marched toward them. Their boots thudded in time on the dirt road, stirring up a small cloud of dust. ..."
165.
"... into the shadows to avoid being detected. The Union soldiers filed past. “I told you!” David whispered. The company marched off down the road until they were gone from sight. “What’s he doin’ jinin’ up with the Yankees?” Jake wondered out loud. “He’s a traitor!” ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 7: Chapter Seven
"...companylowing morning, they learned that a regiment of Union soldiers had gotten ahead of them in an attempt to cut them off. General Whiting, the brigade commander, galloped past them on his steed, his hands clasped and his face raised to the sky in prayer while he rode to the ..."
"...companyevening of May 30, Hiram’s regiment was ordered to march a few miles east of Richmond, where they bivouacked in a grove of oak trees. The men of company G, the Marion Light Infantry, stacked their guns against one of the oaks, and went to sleep beneath it. During the ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 8: Chapter Eight
"...companybamians heard heavy fighting ahead, and knew they were headed for a hornets’ nest. They passed General Porter’s abandoned camp. Everything was still intact, including tents, officers’ tables, and chairs, appearing as though the Federals intended to return once the threat had passed. General Porter, it was learned, fell back ..."
"...companydiscovered the following day that the 4th Alabama lost twenty-three, including Captain Armistead and Captain Price, and 109 were either wounded or missing. Jim Harrison of company D received admiration for his ability to capture twenty-three men and an officer. In the excitement of battle, he had unintentionally jumped into ..."
"...deliver clothing and food to the “orphans,” a nickname the North Alabamians had acquired because they were without correspondence from their loved ones, due to the Yankee occupation in north Alabama. Betsy felt sorry for the young man, so she gave him a small white dog to keep him company, and to remind him of her. Orange Hugh named the canine Bo, and the two became inseparable. ..."
"...Union sympathizers arrived in Decatur and made it their mission to report Rebels who were hiding in the hills. Union Colonel Abel Streight decided to pursue the offenders, so he took a regiment of infantry and one company of cavalry into the mountains to hunt them down. The cavalry was attacked by Confederate scouts, so they returned to Decatur, but the infantry was successful in capturing the fugitives, and forced them to enlist with the 1st Alabama Cavalry. On July 10, they were inducted into the Union ..."
"...a soldier from company A returned to camp, explaining that he had been captured by Sigel’s Dutch, who were really Germans, but in the Federals’ haste to depart, he was left behind. The Confederates were fed better rations than they had been given since leaving Richmond. Musicians in Hiram’s company, Foggarty, Halsey, and Hickey, celebrated the victory by playing Irish music with instruments they found abandoned on the battlefield by the Union army. That evening, Bud and several others returned to camp. Happy to see that his friend had recovered, Hiram greeted him enthusiastically, and the two exchanged stories ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
"...companybamians ran behind the hill, dropping down as company D was sent to the front. Immediately, they were engaged in heavy skirmishing. Bud and Hiram glanced over at each other, waiting in suspense for their line to be attacked. However, darkness soon fell, and the day’s fighting ended. Stray bullets ..."
166.
"... wretched in convulsive vomiting until his stomach was empty. He staggered toward his company. Sinking down onto his knees, he burst into uncontrollable sobs. Enoch Campbell came to his aid, and assisted him back behind the breastworks. As night fell, the men were instructed to entrench ..."

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"The history is intertwined ingeniously into the plot. It is well plotted and the narrative moves along at nice clip...."

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