A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'Confederacy' mean?

Find out what Confederacy means. Confederacy is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Confederacy

The Confederacy, also known as the Confederate States of America, consisted of eleven states that banded together in an effort to secede from the United States government and form their own nation. These states included Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. The Confederacy is discussed in my novel, A Beautiful Glittering Lie, as follows:

(Page 7)
“I enter upon the duties of the office to which I have been chosen with the hope that the beginnin’ of our career as a confederacy may not be obstructed by hostile opposition to our enjoyment of the separate existence and independence which we have asserted, and, with the blessin’ of Providence, intend to maintain.”

(Page 16)
By April 20, every state in the Confederacy was bracing for war. When David rode to the town of Arab for supplies, he couldn’t believe his eyes. Excitement filled the streets. People hustled about, and small groups of men and boys, firearms in hand, were practicing drills. Two would-be soldiers attempted to play a fife and drum. A newspaper boy hollered out the latest news from an intersection. David’s heart pounded with exhilaration. His moment was close at hand. When he returned home to report the news, to his amazement, his father seemed disinterested, said very little about the event, and told him to tend to his duties.

(Page 31)
During the month of May, the Confederacy’s capital moved from Montgomery to Richmond, and another southern state, North Carolina, seceded. Hiram learned that the reason for his regiment’s relocation was because Union forces had moved into Virginia and seized Alexandria, which was nearly seventy miles away. Although the situation seemed to be worsening, strangely enough, visitors from Huntsville steadily arrived to see their boys, bringing gifts and letters. Citizens from home temporarily took their own places in the ranks as privates, readying for the fight, but the Yankees failed to appear, and rumors of the Federals’ impending advances proved to be false.

(Page 35)
Later in the day, it was learned that General Bee had died from wounds he received. The white clapboard house at the center of the battle belonged to an invalid old woman by the name of Judith Carter Henry. Unable to leave her bed, she had been riddled with bullets. The Federals were commanded by Brigadier General Irvin McDowell. Generals Johnston and Beauregard of the Confederacy had proven themselves a worthy foe, and apparently had defeated the Union soldiers. Hiram and his comrades hoped that, by showing their mettle, they would bring a rapid end to the conflict, thus winning their right to secede.

(Page 44)
On October 7, state leaders announced that Alabama had supplied twenty-seven thousand troops to the Confederacy thus far. This included sixty infantry regiments, thirteen cavalry regiments, six battalions, and twenty batteries. The war was ramping up, that much was certain.

(Pages 47-48)
Caroline received another letter from Hiram the following week, informing her that the 4th Alabama had established their winter camp in the Virginia wilderness. He apologized, but didn’t foresee the possibility of returning home for Christmas. Hiding her disappointment, she put on a smile, told her children that their brave father was staying in Virginia for the holidays, and carried on as if it didn’t affect her. Deep down, however, her heart was breaking. She knew that he was defending their homeland, but although it was honorable and noble, she missed him desperately. Every day was more of a struggle, trying to keep up with the farm. She was thankful for her children, and the neighbors who supported her, but it still seemed daunting. Hopefully, the war would end after the first of the year, so that the grand Confederacy would be allowed to secede and become its own country.

(Page 50)
“My ma says that it’s right fittin’ and all. She says that Twilight symbolizes the transitions we’ve all been goin’ through—the new Confederacy and two new presidents, talk of freein’ the slaves, and the country splittin’ in two. It’s like the dawnin’ of a new day.”

(Page 56)
Out of sheer boredom, some infantrymen played practical jokes on their comrades. One such fellow, Enoch Campbell, whom Bud and Hiram met upon their arrival into the army, was appointed barber. For his own entertainment, Enoch frequently shaved half of his patrons’ faces before walking off to leave the other half unshaven. A few of the younger, more irresponsible men planted gunpowder near their messmates’ bedrolls, finding great fun in exploding it while their friends lay sleeping, until they were severely reprimanded by their superiors. Some unruly soldiers were disciplined for their disruptive behavior by spending time in the “bullpen,” or guardhouse, and given just bread and water to sustain on. Other offenders were paraded around camp to the tunes of “Yankee Doodle” and “Rough’s March,” wearing only barrels, with signs around their necks that read “liar” and “thief.” Several were ordered to carry out extra sentry duty, or were refused their pay, although the Confederacy had yet to compensate any of its defenders.

(Page 56)
The war started to revive. Robert E. Lee had been defeated at Cheat Mountain, but the Rebels came out victorious at Balls Bluff. Two more states joined the Confederacy—Missouri and Kentucky. By March, Johnston moved his army to the Rappahannock River. The Alabamians were anxious for a fight.

(Pages 60-61)
Meanwhile, the Confederacy passed the Conscription Act, which required all men aged eighteen years and older to enlist. Many felt the law was a contradiction to state sovereignty, which was what the Confederacy had been founded on. Newspapers reported that Fort Pulaski, located at the mouth of the Savannah River, had fallen, and Union forces captured it by using rifled cannon. They also printed that, on April 12, what was being called the “Great Locomotive Chase” took place. Several Federal volunteers had attempted to steal the Confederate locomotive General, but were discovered as they headed north from Big Shanty, Georgia. The Confederate crew of the Texas chased the General with their train in reverse, and finally captured it north of Ringgold. The story made great fodder for adventure-seeking readers. Hiram knew it wouldn’t be long before dime novels exploited the event, which meant his son would eagerly devour it. Still waiting to embark on an adventure of their own, the men of the 4th Alabama sat poised on their haunches, impatiently waiting for another battle. They learned that Huntsville had become occupied and vowed vengeance in whatever capacity they could manage, be it when they returned home on furlough, or sooner.

(Page 76)
The Union army was far superior in numbers and rations, although McClellan had been fooled into thinking otherwise. The Rebels realized that they had an enormous task before them, but they were willing to accept the challenge, because they adored “Bobby” Lee and Colonel Law. Their loyalty ran deep, even though the men were all too familiar with hunger, as well as discomfort brought on by rain and vermin. Despite new clothing, their shoes were wearing thin. Regardless, they still intended to keep their vow to the Confederacy. Hiram was no different. He fully intended to see the thing through, because his conscience wouldn’t allow it any other way. It was his duty to remain.

(Page 93)
It seemed obvious by what the press was reporting that, because of Lincoln’s declared Emancipation Proclamation, the chances of Europe backing the C.S.A. were quelled. England and France had considered supporting the Southern states before the war became an issue of slavery, but now it was something they didn’t want to get involved in. The Confederacy was completely on its own.

(Page 93)
He waited for word of Owen’s arrival, but none came, so he assumed that he must have been misinformed. Even though he didn’t like him personally, he did wish Owen had enlisted with the Confederacy instead, for then he would loathe his schoolmate a little less. He also wished he could get his mother’s mare back, but realized that was improbable.

Search result for 'Confederacy' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 1: Chapter One
"...Confederacyupon the duties of the office to which I have been chosen with the hope that the beginnin’ of our career as a Confederacy may not be obstructed by hostile opposition to our enjoyment of the separate existence and independence which we have asserted, and, with the blessin’ of Providence, ..."
"...By April 20, every state in the Confederacy was bracing for war. When David rode to the town of Arab for supplies, he couldn’t believe his eyes. Excitement filled the streets. People hustled about, and small groups of men and boys, firearms in hand, were practicing drills. Two would-be soldiers attempted to play a fife and drum. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 3: Chapter Three
"...During the month of May, the Confederacy’s capital moved from Montgomery to Richmond, and another southern state, North Carolina, seceded. Hiram learned that the reason for his regiment’s relocation was because Union forces had moved into Virginia and seized Alexandria, which was nearly seventy miles away. Although the situation seemed to be worsening, strangely enough, visitors ..."
"...The white clapboard house at the center of the battle belonged to an invalid old woman by the name of Judith Carter Henry. Unable to leave her bed, she had been riddled with bullets. The Federals were commanded by Brigadier General Irvin McDowell. Generals Johnston and Beauregard of the Confederacy had proven themselves a worthy foe, and apparently had defeated the Union soldiers. Hiram and his comrades hoped that, by showing their mettle, they would bring a rapid end to the conflict, thus winning their right to secede. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 4: Chapter Four
155.
"... On October 7, state leaders announced that Alabama had supplied twenty-seven thousand troops to the Confederacy thus far. This included sixty infantry regiments, thirteen cavalry regiments, six battalions, and twenty batteries. The war was ramping up, that much was certain. Caroline ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 5: Chapter Five
"...missed him desperately. Every day was more of a struggle, trying to keep up with the farm. She was thankful for her children, and the neighbors who supported her, but it still seemed daunting. Hopefully, the war would end after the first of the year, so that the grand Confederacy would be allowed to secede and become its own country. ..."
99.
"... “My ma says that it’s right fittin’ and all. She says that Twilight symbolizes the transitions we’ve all been goin’ through—the new Confederacy and two new presidents, talk of freein’ the slaves, and the country splittin’ in two. It’s like the dawnin’ of a new day.” ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 6: Chapter Six
"...and water to sustain on. Other offenders were paraded around camp to the tunes of “Yankee Doodle” and “Rough’s March,” wearing only barrels, with signs around their necks that read “liar” and “thief.” Several were ordered to carry out extra sentry duty, or were refused their pay, although the Confederacy had yet to compensate any of its defenders. ..."
7.
"... The war started to revive. Robert E. Lee had been defeated at Cheat Mountain, but the Rebels came out victorious at Balls Bluff. Two more states joined the Confederacy—Missouri and Kentucky. By March, Johnston moved his army to the Rappahannock River. The Alabamians were anxious for a fight. ..."
"...Meanwhile, the Confederacy passed the Conscription Act, which required all men aged eighteen years and older to enlist. Many felt the law was a contradiction to state sovereignty, which was what the Confederacy had been founded on. Newspapers reported that Fort Pulaski, located at the mouth of the Savannah River, had fallen, ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 8: Chapter Eight
"...they adored “Bobby” Lee and Colonel Law. Their loyalty ran deep, even though the men were all too familiar with hunger, as well as discomfort brought on by rain and vermin. Despite new clothing, their shoes were wearing thin. Regardless, they still intended to keep their vow to the Confederacy. Hiram was no different. He fully intended to see the thing through, because his conscience wouldn’t allow it any other way. It was his duty to remain. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
"...press was reporting that, because of Lincoln’s declared Emancipation Proclamation, the chances of Europe backing the C.S.A. were quelled. England and France had considered supporting the Southern states before the war became an issue of slavery, but now it was something they didn’t want to get involved in. The Confederacy was completely on its own. ..."
"...He waited for word of Owen’s arrival, but none came, so he assumed that he must have been misinformed. Even though he didn’t like him personally, he did wish Owen had enlisted with the Confederacy instead, for then he would loathe his schoolmate a little less. He also wished he could get his mother’s mare back, but realized that was improbable. ..."

Search result for 'Confederacy' in the FAQs of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

There were no results for 'Confederacy' in the FAQs of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Reviews

"The history is intertwined ingeniously into the plot. It is well plotted and the narrative moves along at nice clip...."

More Reviews
Share on Facebook Tweet This
Buy this book:
Visit the
A Beautiful Glittering Lie
website
Join J D R Hawkins on Google+
Get a Book Preview website