A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'Confederate' mean?

Find out what Confederate means. Confederate is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Confederate

Anyone who was loyal to the Confederacy during the American Civil War. Also known as a Southron, a Southerner, a Secesh, and a Rebel. In my novel, A Beautiful Glittering Lie, Hiram Summers, Bud Samuels, and several other characters are thrown into the proverbial lion's den when they enlist as Confederate soldiers. These men embark on the adventure of their lives. Fighting their way through First Manassas (Bull Run) to Fredericksburg, they encountering heroism, homesickness, horror, and heartache. The term "Confederate" is used as follows:

(Page 7)
“Gentlemen of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, friends, and fellow citizens. Called to the difficult and responsible station of chief executive of the provisional government which you have instituted, I approach the discharge of the duties assigned to me with a humble distrust of my abilities …”

(Page 8)
“If we may not hope to avoid war,” Jefferson Davis read, “we may at least expect that posterity will acquit us of havin’ needlessly engaged in it. Doubly justified by the absence of wrong on our part, and by wanton aggression on the part of others, there can be no cause to doubt that the courage and patriotism of the people of the Confederate States will be found equal to any measures of defense which their honor and security may require …”

(Page 9)
“We have changed the constituent parts, but not the system of government,” Jefferson Davis went on to say. “The Constitution formed by our fathers is that of these Confederate States …”

(Page 16)
Two quiet weeks passed. He helped his father plant rows of peas, and tilled the soil, preparing it for corn and sorghum. Their peacefulness didn’t last long, for news came that Fort Sumter, off the coast of South Carolina in Charleston Harbor, had been bombarded by Confederate forces and captured. Two days later, President Lincoln called for 75,000 volunteers, evidence that a war was now truly imminent. On April 17, Virginia seceded, and two days later, a mob of Southern sympathizers in Baltimore attacked the 6th Massachusetts Regiment while it marched through on its way to Washington. Newspapers reported that four soldiers and twenty rioters were killed.

(Page 20)
Following the ceremony, each officer was given a bouquet of flowers, and to each enlistee, a newly constructed Confederate uniform was distributed. The jackets were gray homespun wool with a row of nine shiny brass buttons down the front. Kepis were allotted as headwear, and brogans for footwear. Every man was instructed to bring his own firearm and ammunition if possible, as well as knives and hygienic items. The pastor dispersed small Testaments, blessing each soldier while he went down the line, and telling them that they were expected to learn not only duty to their country, but also how to fight the great moral battle of life. The recruits were then ordered to return the following Monday to the Huntsville Depot for departure. Before the evening’s festivities ended, members of the new company exchanged vows with each other, stating that they would protect one another like brethren “to the death.”

(Page 28)
“Soldiers of the Confederate States of America!” the nearest pacing sergeant hollered, staring each enlistee in the eye. “I am your superior officer, Sergeant Meadows!”

(Page 29)
On the following day, May 6, Arkansas seceded from the Union, and on the following day, the 4th Alabama was inducted into Confederate service, mustered in for the duration of one year. Following several days of idleness, the recruits embarked yet again via train to Strasburg, Virginia, arriving on May 11. The weather had become partly cloudy, to the men’s delight. They rested in the afternoon, and prepared rations for the next day’s march that evening.

(Page 30)
The following morning, Hiram and his band of brothers set out on a twenty-mile march, learning the reason why they were ordered to prepare rations in advance, for those who had failed to follow orders suffered by having empty stomachs. With four drummer boys keeping rhythm, they arrived in Winchester late in the day to a welcoming reception. The town’s residents greeted them enthusiastically by waving Confederate flags and handkerchiefs that resembled fluttering butterflies, and cheered the soldiers, who tiredly marched through town.

(Page 30)
The camp chaplain, William D. Chaddick, preached fervently, quoting scripture, although he distorted the content to justify their cause by inferring that the enemy was evil, and that the Confederates were right and noble: “And if thy right eye offend thee, pluck it out, and cast it from thee: for it is profitable for thee that one of thy members should perish, and not that thy whole body should be cast into hell. And if thy right hand offend thee, cut it off, and cast it from thee: for it is profitable for thee that one of thy members should perish, and not that thy whole body should be cast into hell.”

(Page 32)
News came that Union General George B. McClellan had driven the Confederates out of the Allegheny Mountains, thus bringing the western portion of Virginia under U.S. control. By doing so, he secured himself a nickname, “Little Napoleon.” A short time later, it was reported that the U.S. Sanitary Commission had been founded by a group of New York women who intended to promote healthful practices within the ranks. Although Rebel forces had no such committee, they followed suit with similar designs.

(Page 32)
The Fourth of July was observed with a speech by President Lincoln, whose plea to Congress led to the authorized call for five hundred thousand Federal volunteers. By making such a request, Lincoln apparently had made a total declaration of war, and the Confederates took it as such. Two days later, Private Humphreys was discharged. He returned to Alabama to raise a brigade, electing himself as colonel.

(Page 32)
Storm clouds mushroomed, thickening to a dark gray by dusk, and obscured the setting sun. Around 10:30 p.m., the Confederate soldiers arrived at Piedmont Station in a miserable, torrential downpour. They sloshed through mud while trying to keep their gunpowder dry. Completely exhausted, the men struggled to obtain what little rest they could under their temporary shelters, which failed to provide much remedy from the rain. At midnight, they took a train to Manassas Junction, arriving at approximately 9:00 a.m. on the morning of July 20.

(Page 33)
After two hours of quiet, the Yankees resumed their assault, and the Confederates fought off several Union advances. Men in colorful garb fashioned after French Algerian Zouaves attacked first, but were driven back. Then came, one at a time, three other regiments, but all eventually broke and ran. Their uniforms caused confusion, for men on either side were dressed in both blue and gray, including Colonel Jones, who wore the blue uniform he had donned while previously serving in the U.S. Army.

(Page 33)
The men spied two unknown regiments clad in gray, approaching in a line on their right. Assuming they were Confederates, the Alabamians signaled by raising their hands to their caps while giving the password, “our homes,” and the unknown regiment signaled back by mirroring the action. Law ordered his soldiers to form a line behind the new arrivals. As soon as the 4th unfurled their flags, they were quickly surprised when the culprits turned and opened fire on them. Several men were shot, screaming in agony while the deceivers perpetrated their lines. Others reacted by bursting into hysterical laughter, contrary to what the situation demanded.

(Pages 35-36)
Soldiers from other regiments wandered into camp, describing the turmoil that had swirled around them. Brigadier General J. E. B. Stuart, Confederate cavalry commander, had hurled his cavaliers into the New York Zouaves, and as the Yankees retreated, all hell broke loose. Civilians from Washington City had driven over to witness the battle, bringing along their ladies, complete with picnic lunches, parasols, and fine carriages. However, when the Federals “skedaddled,” they almost killed the Washington elite. An artillery shell worsened the situation when it hit a wagon, clogging the road that had been their escape route. Congressman Healy was captured by the Confederates and taken prisoner. The Rebels were calling it the “Bull Run Races.”

(Page 43)
The spectators stood along the curbside, watching as a detachment of forty soldiers from each of the eleven companies training at Camp Jones marched by in full uniform, complete with glistening bayonets and polished boots. Next came the glass hearse, decorated with white plumes and crepe, drawn by four white horses draped in black. The coffin lay inside, swathed with black cloth. On top of it was displayed a Confederate flag, the deceased’s sword, and wreaths of fresh flowers and evergreens. Pallbearers including both citizens and soldiers walked on either side of the hearse while it made its way down the street. Behind it, an infantryman rode Old Battalion, who had come home with his master. Members of the 4th Alabama marched behind to a requiem that the band played in accompaniment, followed by the mayor and Huntsville aldermen. Next were the colonel’s relatives, who rode in a black carriage, and various citizens in vehicles and on foot, trailing behind in a long succession.

(Page 46)
According to newspaper reports, the USS San Jacinto stopped the British ship Trent in international waters, and arrested two Confederate ambassadors: J. M. Mason, who was commissioner to England, and the commissioner to France, John Slidell. The men were taken to Boston and imprisoned, but when the news broke, public outcry prevailed, so Lincoln felt compelled to release the two captives, excusing his disregard for foreign policy by saying only, “One war at a time.”

(Page 53)
School resumed, but classes were intermittent, since the weather dictated participation and attendance. Josie brought home a new grammar book, which focused on the war effort and Confederate superiority over the Northern invaders. The new readers were also chock-full of anti-Yankee sentiment. David found them amusing, as did his little sister, although the propaganda they exuded was somewhat disturbing, in that they promoted the murder of Yankees.

(Pages 54-55)
The soldiers spent their days drilling, constructing corduroy roads, and tending to what little livestock the camp contained. A few of the men acquired pets, including dogs, a goat, and a few chickens. Those who were fortunate enough to secure Confederate currency used their hard-earned cash on overpriced luxuries provided by sutlers’ row, or “robbers’ row,” as they referred to it.

(Page 56)
The 4th Alabama received word that Stonewall Jackson had attacked Union forces in the Shenandoah Valley, forcing the Yankees to rush back to Washington and defend the city from a possible Confederate attack. They also learned that Nathan Bedford Forrest’s men were on the move in Tennessee, and great concern arose over the possible invasion of Alabama by Union troops. A significant battle had taken place at Pea Ridge, Arkansas, with triumphant Union troops seizing control of the Missouri River. And at the mouth of the James River, the CSS Virginia, the first of its kind, called an “ironclad,” met its equal with the Union’s ironclad, the USS Monitor. Both ships fired upon each other throughout the day of March 9, but neither was victorious. The Virginia was unable to penetrate and destroy the Union blockade.

(Page 57)
General Johnston relocated the 4th Alabama to join with the main army south of the Rappahannock and moved it in the direction of Richmond. In early March, he learned that McClellan was encroaching, so he hastily transferred his troops from Centreville, leaving behind half-cooked food and property belonging to the Confederate army. He moved his men south of the Rappahannock, but not before leaving Quaker guns behind in empty earthworks to deter his rival. The “guns” were actually logs that had been cut and painted to resemble cannon snouts.

(Page 57)
A few days after his birthday, Rena received a letter from a schoolmate, Thomas Halsey, who had enlisted the previous month. He wrote that he was assigned to an Alabama battalion under General Braxton Bragg, and although the weather was predictably rainy, he was in good spirits. He then informed her that he had fond feelings for her. She brushed the sentiment aside, considering it to be nostalgia, and showed the letter to her brother, who flushed upon reading it. David knew that Thomas was two years his senior and had more obligations to enlist, since he had a brother and four cousins who were Confederate soldiers. Regardless, he was envious, and although he obediently performed his duties at home, he still wished to be a soldier.

(Page 57)
The family learned three days later that a great battle was taking place in Tennessee, near Shiloh Church, which was only about eighty miles from Huntsville. Reports of the battle were carried in by courier. David eagerly hovered around Ben Johnson’s in anticipation of incoming telegrams, and while he was there, a courier rode in. According to the messenger, some twenty thousand troops were converging on the area, and the fighting was bloody. Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston had been killed, and the Union army had been chased back to Pittsburg Landing on the Tennessee River. From the looks of things, the Rebels were victorious, according to the dispatch rider, who immediately set off toward Huntsville to retrieve more information. Waving his hat in the air, he let out a whoop and rode away.

(Page 57)
A few days later, on Thursday, April 10, Jake accompanied David to the mercantile, where they received terrible news. The Yankees had won the battle at Shiloh, forcing the defeated Confederates to retreat south. Rumor had it that the Federals were giving chase by also heading in their direction. The boys rode home to inform their parents, and all braced themselves for the worst, hiding valuables and preparing extra food, just in case they had to escape from invading Yankee soldiers.

(Page 59)
New officers were chosen. Ivander Law was reelected as colonel, and Charles Scott as major. In all, twenty-five officers were replaced. It wasn’t surprising to the men that Law retained his command. He had become close to Confederate General John Bell Hood as a strategic career move and had also positioned himself favorably with influential military personnel and politicians. The remaining North Alabamians reenlisted for three years, hoping that their service wouldn’t be needed for that duration.

(Pages 59-60)

Meanwhile, the Confederacy passed the Conscription Act, which required all men aged eighteen years and older to enlist. Many felt the law was a contradiction to state sovereignty, which was what the Confederacy had been founded on. Newspapers reported that Fort Pulaski, located at the mouth of the Savannah River, had fallen, and Union forces captured it by using rifled cannon. They also printed that, on April 12, what was being called the “Great Locomotive Chase” took place. Several Federal volunteers had attempted to steal the Confederate locomotive General, but were discovered as they headed north from Big Shanty, Georgia. The Confederate crew of the Texas chased the General with their train in reverse, and finally captured it north of Ringgold. The story made great fodder for adventure-seeking readers. Hiram knew it wouldn’t be long before dime novels exploited the event, which meant his son would eagerly devour it. Still waiting to embark on an adventure of their own, the men of the 4th Alabama sat poised on their haunches, impatiently waiting for another battle. They learned that Huntsville had become occupied and vowed vengeance in whatever capacity they could manage, be it when they returned home on furlough, or sooner.

(Page 62)
Miss Emily shook her head. “It’s been horrible,” she stated blatantly. “The Confederate soldiers who were hidin’ in town have all run off. My li’l’ brother and I can’t attend school, and the businesses have all closed. The Huntsville Democrat has been taken over, and those heathen Yankees have renamed it the Huntsville Reveille.”

(Pages 65-66)
The following morning, they learned that a regiment of Union soldiers had gotten ahead of them in an attempt to cut them off. General Whiting, the brigade commander, galloped past them on his steed, his hands clasped and his face raised to the sky in prayer while he rode to the front. Later on in the day, General Hood managed to push the Yankees back, prompting some of the men to comment on how General Whiting’s prayers had been answered. One of the North Alabamians, Orderly Sergeant Hartley, and a private from Company A, were sent out as scouts later that evening, but when morning came, only the private returned. Sergeant Hartley had been shot, and the private brought back his bullet-pierced roll book to prove it. Hiram and the rest of Company I once again felt sorrow, for although Hartley had been from Connecticut, he was well liked, and a true Confederate patriot.

(Pages 67-68)
Early the following morning, the Alabamians traveled eight miles to the beat of their drums toward Seven Pines and their foe. The Stars and Bars, St. Andrews Cross, the regimental colors, and the Bonnie Blue Flag all flew gallantly above the advancing Confederates. Once they arrived, they saw that the Union army had been driven out, for all that remained were their empty tents. Throughout the course of the day, the 4th was maneuvered to different locations, but still didn’t see any fighting. By evening, they had been placed on the Richmond and York River railroad tracks. The empty camp was in a patch of woods to their left, and an active Union battery was in front of them.

(Page 68)
At daybreak, the Confederates waited for the battle to resume. Word spread throughout camp that General Johnston had been replaced by General Smith, who hesitated in bringing on an advancing attack. The men wondered about this proxy, because it was known that General Smith was in ill health. Talk of the wounded reached the North Alabamians, who were saddened to learn that one of the casualties was Gus Mastin, the color bearer for the Huntsville Guards. The same silk flag that had been given to him during the presentation ceremony, featuring the name of the Huntsville Female College, had been taken from his lifeless body by a Union soldier.

(Page 68)
While the hours ticked by, the soldiers grew restless, but knew there was nothing they could do. Early in the afternoon, General Lee arrived. The men soon learned that he had been given control of the Confederate army, and that General Smith was relieved of command. Lee promptly renamed his soldiers. What had previously been known as the “Army of the Potomac” became the “Army of Northern Virginia.” For his first act of authority, he commanded his troops to “strike the tent,” and returned them to Richmond. The 4th Alabama had lost eight of their own, and nineteen were wounded. General Whiting was placed in command of the division, while Colonel Law was designated as brigade commander. The men had “seen the elephant” once more, and speculated about when the beast would reappear to rear its ugly head.

(Page 74)
General McClellan moved his vast army to the south side of the Chickahominy River, in an attempt to confront Lee below Richmond. While he was there, the commander of Robert E. Lee’s Confederate cavalry, General J. E. B. Stuart, received fame by riding around McClellan’s troops. Originally ordered to reconnoiter the Army of the Potomac’s movements, Stuart and his cavaliers decided to risk their lives by going around, instead of returning to Richmond the way they had come, and their successful exploit awarded them the capture of 170 prisoners and 300 horses and mules. According to one report, the cavaliers slowed down only to accept bouquets and kisses from admiring women.

(Pages 74-75)
Confederate General Whiting rode forward, and soon the bridge was repaired, enabling the men to cross. The Confederates shelled the woods to make sure no Yankees were waiting to ambush them, and then they cautiously proceeded, clearing debris from their path while they forged ahead. Generals Ewell and A. P. Hill joined them, taking one road, and the Alabamians took another. On June 27, they reached Cold Harbor, but only after considerable effort, because obstacles and sharpshooters hindered their progress.

(Page 75)
Lieutenant Colonel McLemore, who had been promoted to the 4th Alabama in May, appeared at the front of the line. Marching backward, he faced his Confederates and loudly ordered the march: “Guide center, keep in step! One, two, three, four! One, two, three, four!”

(Page 75)
The Confederates jumped into the Union breastworks, stampeding like cattle. In response, the Federals broke and ran as the Alabamians thundered up the ascent to the second line of defense. The Yankees from the first line swept through the second, and all turned tail. The Rebels kept shrieking, cursing, and running in pursuit. They attacked the third line that waited at the top of the hill. The Union soldiers panicked and fell back, retreating at a run to avoid the charging Confederates, who fired a successful volley into the fleeing enemy. Before the Federals could remove their artillery pieces, the Rebels captured fourteen of them. As the Alabamians watched their enemies escape, their voices rose up in triumphant cheers, which spread through the ranks.

(Page 75)
Hiram stopped to catch his breath, watching the smoke clear. He looked around for Bud until he finally saw him walking toward him. The two congratulated each other amidst their shouting, jubilant comrades. As darkness fell, the Yankees escaped across the Chickahominy. General Lee was rewarded with his first victory, and the Confederates’ shock tactics had proved to be successful.

(Page 75)
It was discovered the following day that the 4th Alabama lost twenty-three, including Captain Armistead and Captain Price, and 109 were either wounded or missing. Jim Harrison of Company D received admiration for his ability to capture twenty-three men and an officer. In the excitement of battle, he had unintentionally jumped into a trench filled with Federals, so he shot one and took the rest prisoner. Among the Yankees captured by the Confederates was Colonel McLemore’s old regiment, the 8th U.S. Infantry, which he had resigned from at the onset of the war.

(Page 76)
The injured Confederates were carried to Richmond, where nearly every house was a hospital, and every woman served as a nurse. General McClellan retreated to his gunboats on the James River, while General Jackson moved his troops to Harrison’s Landing. They arrived on July 3, and remained there for five more days, until General Lee ordered his army back to Richmond, and restructured it into two corps. The 4th Alabama fell under the command of Generals Lee and Longstreet, and General Jackson led the other corps. General Whiting was transferred, so General Hood took his command. While camped at Richmond, the men acquired new clothing, cooking utensils, kettles, frying pans, and “spiders,” or skillets.

(Page 76)
Colonel Turchin’s men had been having a field day in Athens. Aside from their uncontrolled outrages against the citizens, the Yankees singled out a slave named Matthew Gray. They forced Gray and a captured Confederate soldier to mount a mule, and after tying their feet together under the animal, they drove the mule into the Tennessee River. Fortunately for the victims, the mule swam to the other side, and the two men managed to free themselves instead of drowning, as was the intention. The townsfolk were ecstatic when Turchin, as well as his superior, General Mitchel, was finally removed from command.

(Page 76)
Although Mitchel was gone, his family, who had arrived on July 12, remained in Huntsville. According to Billy Ryan, they could be seen riding around town in their carriage as though flaunting their presence in enemy territory. On one occasion, they cut off the funeral procession of a murdered Confederate picket. The Mitchels were disliked from the start, because they helped themselves to anyone’s property that they so desired. The citizens couldn’t be rid of them soon enough, but it took several weeks for them to get their wish. In the meantime, Mitchel was replaced by Major General Lovell H. Rousseau, who was more easygoing than his predecessor.

(Page 77)
Union sympathizers arrived in Decatur and made it their mission to report Rebels who were hiding in the hills. Union Colonel Abel Streight decided to pursue the offenders, so he took a regiment of infantry and one company of cavalry into the mountains to hunt them down. The cavalry was attacked by Confederate scouts, so they returned to Decatur, but the infantry was successful in capturing the fugitives, and forced them to enlist with the 1st Alabama Cavalry. On July 10, they were inducted into the Union Army.

(Page 78)
Leaving his family there, he returned to the farm. He waited alone as night fell, watching stars shower overhead in the dark sky, and recalled the same occurrence a year ago, when he and Jake had lounged upon the Kimballs’ veranda, contemplating the war and their trip to Huntsville, where they first caught sight of Wheeler’s Confederate army preparing for war.

(Page 79)
General Lee’s Confederates spent July and the first part of August recuperating. Jackson moved to Gordonsville, where he encountered Pope, and deceived the Union general by lighting numerous fires to make his forces appear larger than they were. This stratagem proved effective, because Pope retreated, but not before Jackson captured a portion of his army. Meanwhile, the 4th Alabama repositioned from Richmond to Gordonsville to support Jackson. After spending three months in Richmond, they were more than happy to be back on the march. Hiram and Bud joked between themselves as they tramped along, while Bo the dog obediently trotted behind Orange Hugh.

(Page 79)
Two days later, the Rebels continued their pursuit of the Federals. They reached the Rappahannock, and moved upriver under constant shelling from their adversaries. The 4th Alabama was ordered to the front of the advancing Confederates. They charged, driving the Yankees into the river. As a result, many who couldn’t swim drowned, while others were killed or captured.

(Page 80)
The North Alabamians came to a crossing, where they discovered what had held them up. A young man in full Confederate uniform, but without shoes, dangled from an overhead branch, his lifeless body swaying at the end of a horse’s reins.

(Page 80)
Late that evening, the corps’ two brigades were positioned to advance through the narrow gap, which was only wide enough to allow for railroad tracks and a road. The steep, craggy sides prevented the Confederates from seeing in any direction but straight ahead. They chased the retreating Yankees, firing their rifles and muskets continuously while they pursued, the clatter of their guns echoing through the gap. The 4th was directed to climb the slope in an attempt to flank their retreating enemy, and after much difficulty, they succeeded at nightfall. The men bivouacked, where they sustained themselves on hardtack and tobacco.

(Page 80)
The Confederates continued to drive the Yankees until they were close, and then waited for their artillery to arrive. Once positioned on the field, the cannons exploded into the Union soldiers.

(Page 81)
The Federals advanced a column of infantry out from the woods toward Jackson and his men, who lay in wait within a railroad cut. They retaliated by firing into them. The two opposing forces clashed in hand-to-hand combat until the Yankees finally retreated. Pope marched out one column after another, only to have each one repelled. Jackson’s men used all of their ammunition, so they had to fight off the advancing Union soldiers by hurling rocks. The 4th Alabama continued to observe until they were called upon, along with General Longstreet’s men, to support Jackson. They rushed to his rescue, and the Yankees were finally forced to retreat, leaving their dead and dying on the field. All the while, artillery from both sides continued firing canister and grapeshot. Billowing smoke hung over the infantrymen as opposing sides shot at each other. Like the previous day, the Confederates again drove their enemies, until nightfall hindered them.

(Page 81)
Later in the day, a soldier from Company A returned to camp, explaining that he had been captured by Sigel’s Dutch, who were really Germans, but in the Federals’ haste to depart, he was left behind. The Confederates were fed better rations than they had been given since leaving Richmond. Musicians in Hiram’s company, Foggarty, Halsey, and Hickey, celebrated the victory by playing Irish music with instruments they found abandoned on the battlefield by the Union army. That evening, Bud and several others returned to camp. Happy to see that his friend had recovered, Hiram greeted him enthusiastically, and the two exchanged stories of their exploits.

(Page 82)
“Sure is. Except now it’s called the Huntsville Confederate.”

(Page 84)
The Confederates heard that General Pope had been replaced by none other than McClellan, who had turned his Grand Army of the Potomac away from Washington, and was headed back in the direction of Fredericktown. The Alabamians reached Hagerstown, where they awaited news from Jackson. While there, they discovered that the Maryland countryside had been left virtually untainted, unlike the ravaged landscape of Virginia.

(Page 84)
Their reprieve was short-lived, for the next morning, September 14, they were ordered to hurriedly prepare rations and march back to Boonesborough Gap. The men learned that their sudden turnabout was due to a blunder made during the previous week. A copy of Confidential Special Order No. 191, wrapped around three cigars, was discovered by a Union soldier in Fredericktown, and given to General McClellan. The order outlined Lee’s intentions, so McClellan reacted by attempting to cut off the Confederate army, which was scattered from Harpers Ferry to Hagerstown. The Alabamians raced to the aid of General Hill, who was subjected to protecting the gap with his small army until reinforcements arrived.

(Page 86)
The Confederates advanced into the trees, skirmishing with their enemies as they drove them out. Captain Scruggs, who fell wounded, was quickly replaced by Captain Robbins. Realizing that they were at an advantage, the Rebels shot down scores of Yankees while concealing themselves in the cover of trees, fighting savagely despite their extreme hunger and fatigue. Other regiments of their brigade, the Texans, South Carolinians, and Georgians, were out in the open on their left, and suffered because of it. As dawn began to lighten the sky, Hiram noticed a Union general riding around the field on a large white horse.

(Page 86)
Yankee artillery fired into General Hood’s right flank and rear, causing the Rebels to fall back. The ground was scattered with bodies, most of which were clad in blue. Many Confederate soldiers had exhausted their ammunition when Lieutenant Stewart informed them that they had been fighting for nearly three hours straight. Fearing that the enemy would chase after them, they quickly re-formed, but discovered their haste was unnecessary, as the Yankees failed to respond. The Alabamians took much-needed time to replenish their ammunition and catch their breath.

(Page 87)
During the following days, reports came in that the battle was declared a draw, although General Lee pulled his troops back onto Confederate soil. The cornfield that the Alabamians had marched across was mowed down by bullets, as though cut with a scythe. The 4th Alabama came out better than most, with only eight dead and thirty-six wounded. Hood’s Texans lost nearly 80 percent of their troops, as well as their colors. The battle was the bloodiest single day since the war’s start, the casualties so excessive that both sides called a truce at one point to clear the field of their dead. One of those killed was Union General Phil Kearny, who had been close friends with A. P. Hill. Another was Bernie Kelton, the man who had volunteered to enlist in place of his brother. Hiram wondered how the brother would take hearing the news, once he learned that Bernie sacrificed his life for him. He felt a wave of pity for the new father who had lost his brother, and who most certainly would feel responsible. Dozier Downs had simply disappeared.

(Page 87)
McClellan attempted to chase after the Rebels, and some of his troops captured four Confederate cannons. On the morning of September 20, the Federals were driven back across the Potomac, where they remained. Apparently, McClellan was satisfied with himself enough to sit back on his laurels.

(Page 88)
Two days later, on September 22, Abraham Lincoln announced his Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, freeing slaves in Confederate states, but not in Union or neutral states. No blacks were allowed into Lincoln’s home state of Illinois, and the president didn’t contest it. The Rebels thought him a hypocrite, since he was freeing slaves he had no control over, but the ones he had the power to liberate remained enslaved. Eight days later, the men learned that their beloved commander, Colonel McLemore, had died after a prolonged decline. The next day, they moved their camp to a location between Bunker Hill and Winchester, where they remained until the latter part of October, living on captured provisions and food they obtained from local farmers.

(Page 88)
On October 8, the Battle of Perryville took place, which was Kentucky’s only major battle thus far, between Union General Buell and Confederate General Braxton Bragg. Because the Republicans thought Buell was proslavery for wanting to protect Southerners’ property, he was relieved of his command. On October 9, General Longstreet was promoted to lieutenant general. A day later, so was General Jackson, and on that same day, General Stuart began his raid into Pennsylvania. The troopers rode up to Chambersburg, where they helped themselves to fresh horses and newly harvested fodder. They continued on around the Union army and returned to Virginia, completing Stuart’s second ride around McClellan.

(Page 93)
David stayed informed by acquiring current editions of the Huntsville Confederate, which had been reduced down to only one sheet folded into two pages, due to the paper shortage. Major changes were taking place within both armies. As of November 10, Alabama had supplied over sixty thousand men to the Confederate cause. President Lincoln replaced McClellan yet again, this time with General Burnside, not so much because of Burnside’s performance at the recent Battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam as the Yankees were calling it, but because of his displayed abilities at First Manassas. Frustrated that “Little Napoleon” had refused to aggressively pursue and attack the Rebels by inaccurately assuming he was outnumbered, Lincoln was quoted as saying to him, “If you don’t want to use the army, I should like to borrow it for a while.”

(Pages 93-94)
Coming across a recent copy of Harper’s Weekly at the mercantile, David opened the publication to discover contents within it that alarmed, yet intrigued him. Inside the pages were engravings, copies of photographs that had been taken near Sharpsburg by a photographer named Alexander Gardner. Even though they were drawings, the pictures were disturbing nevertheless, and depicted crumpled corpses slumped together like potato sacks, laid out in front of a small white building, along with broken caissons, dead mules, overturned limbers, and more pictures of Confederate bodies. It seemed to him that there were no deceased Union soldiers lying about in any of the pictures. Although he knew his father wasn’t among the casualties, he was still appalled by the drawings. He had seen photos of corpses post mortem before, but nothing as horrendous as the mangled bodies of slain soldiers left rotting on the ground with dead horses. Setting the newspaper down, he came to the conclusion that his mother had to somehow be prevented from seeing them. It was apparent that the distant battles in Virginia were getting closer all the time, which he found somewhat distressing.

(Page 97)
Hiram glanced around at his comrades, who were entrenched on either side of him, waiting for another Yankee advance. With time to reflect, he thought back to the previous month’s events. The 4th Alabama had abandoned their encampment for Culpeper Court House, and stayed there until November 22, when Lee discovered that Burnside was headed north from Richmond, so he assembled his troops near the quaint town of Fredericksburg. The Confederate army swelled to almost twice its size, due to returning soldiers who had become ill prior to their march into Maryland. Remaining on the south side of the icy Rappahannock River, the Rebels gazed at the church spires that rose up from the town like bony, skeletal fingers, reaching to the heavens for sanctuary.

(Page 97)
They waited for Burnside to pounce, but their wait was long-lived, for he hesitated. Since the men were required only to attend dress parade and roll call, they idled away their time by staging snowball fights, some so zealous that several soldiers were wounded, and a few were killed. They also spent time exploring the town, as well as the terrain north of camp. Fredericksburg had been nearly evacuated, except for a few citizens who still remained, because their only other option was to camp in the snowy woods until danger passed. On a few rare occasions, the 4th Alabama was detailed to picket duty in town, where they stayed inside deserted homes that housed fine paintings, extensive libraries, and lovely furniture, or they stood guard outside on the piazzas, and in the immaculate sculptured gardens, gazing across the river at the Union soldiers’ tents. They noticed how finely outfitted the Yankees were in their splendid blue uniforms, but the Confederates, in contrast, were clothed in ragged, tattered, dingy butternut.

(Page 98)
On several occasions, Hiram heard music float across the river. The Yankee bands played new songs he had never heard before. One sounded like “John Brown’s Body,” but the words had been changed. This, he learned, was the Union army’s new anthem, “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” He didn’t appreciate the lyrics, since they equated the Confederates to devils, but listened with interest, nonetheless. Another Yankee song they played repetitively was called the “Battle Cry of Freedom.” He liked that one better, but it still didn’t make his spirit soar like “Dixie” did. The Federals played “The Star-Spangled Banner” and “Hail Columbia,” songs the Southerners once held dear, and waited for Confederate bands to reply, but no reprisal came. As if reading Hiram’s mind, the Yankees rambunctiously played “Dixie’s Land.” Men on both sides of the river burst into cheers, which fell away to mutual laughter.

(Page 98)
At ten o’clock, the Yankees started to bombard the town, each of their 367 guns firing fifty rounds. From their position, Hiram and his comrades could see Fredericksburg set ablaze. Hysterical citizens ran out into the streets, scattering into the nearby woods. Although the weather was mild for December, Hiram knew that they would likely freeze come nightfall. The thought of those destitute women and children wrenched his heart. After some time, the Confederates’ efforts to repel the Yankees proved futile. The Federals started over the river in boats and soon began filing across their pontoon bridges. By nightfall, they had taken the town. General Lee arranged his troops, comprised of the brigades of Jackson, Longstreet, A. P. Hill, and McLaws, as well as the divisions led by Taliaferro, D. H. Hill, and Early. Supported by General J. E. B. Stuart’s cavalry and John Pelham’s artillery, the men became entrenched at Marye’s Hill. Their lines stretched seven miles, with eleven thousand men per mile, or six Confederate soldiers per yard. Over three hundred cannons were poised and ready to fire. The 4th was put into position behind an embankment that afforded them sufficient protection.

(Page 98)
At sunup, the North Alabamians awoke to hear Federal bands playing, and the Union infantrymen scuffling about while they moved, but he couldn’t see anything, due to heavy fog. The 4th marched back to their previous position, where they discovered brisk skirmishing and artillery fire taking place. Burnside had begun harassing the Confederates but was unable to accomplish anything.

(Pages 98-99)
They came up from the town as though on parade, and appeared to be unstoppable, like they would keep going over and through the Confederate line. With grape, shell, and shot, the Rebel guns immediately began their deadly work, pouring a storm of lead into the advancing foe, and they blew holes into the dark, solid columns, which were filled in like water rushing around a fractured dam. The thunderous salvos of cannonade shook the ground, retorted by the Yankees’ counter-barrage. The men in gray let loose a bloodcurdling Rebel yell and fired a storm of lead canister into the faces of their enemies as they approached, which was enough to send the bluecoats reeling. They stumbled, taking cover behind the bank. A line of colorful Zouaves passed them, but they could not withstand the Rebel onslaught either. They fell back in confusion.

(Page 99)
The Irish Brigade advanced, hollering “Ireland forever” in Gaelic. “Erin go bragh!” they bellowed in unison while advancing, but they were forced to retreat under the murderous fire of the Confederate guns.

(Page 99)
With his own comrades entrenched on either side of him, Hiram and the North Alabamians observed the fighting. Burnside reignited his attack in earnest at two o’clock by shelling another regiment of Rebels, who stood their ground in a sunken road behind a stone wall. One advance after another tried in vain to break the Confederate stance, but all were unable to penetrate the line. The Yankees marched up the hill until there were so many of their dead clogging the battlefield that the advancing Federals were unable to climb over them. The frozen ground in the sunken road gave way to mud and slush beneath the feet of hundreds of thrashing combatants. Some slipped and fell on grass made slick with the blood of their fellow soldiers. At last, twilight engulfed the battlefield, forcing the Yankees to fall back.

(Page 100)
Shells started flying at them, whistling and bursting all around. While they ran, shot and canister hit the ground, sending a torrent of dirt in their faces, and creating huge craters that they frantically zigzagged to avoid. The Confederates dashed up the hill, escaping the turmoil. Bud glanced back over his shoulder. He saw a shell fly straight at Hiram. It hit him. Hiram’s body exploded like a ripe tomato.

(Page 101)
The men awoke to find it was raining, as it usually did after a battle. They discovered that Burnside’s Federals had crossed the river overnight, demoralized into retreating to Washington. A wave of cheers rushed over the Rebel ranks. While the rain dissipated to drizzle, Bud, who was still in a daze, followed some of his comrades out onto the battlefield, which was covered with dead Yankee soldiers. It was obvious from what they saw that the Union army had suffered almost complete annihilation. Some of the Federals died trying to use their comrades’ bodies as shields. What it must have been like to lie in wait while bullets thudded into the bodies of their friends, Bud could only speculate. Besides corpses dressed in blue, some wore Zouave uniforms, while others adorned their trappings with Kelly green. Blue Hugh said they were with the Irish Brigade, because he had heard that they wore green boxwood sprigs in their caps to display their heritage. The barefoot Confederates immediately set to work, relieving the rigid bodies of their footwear and clothing, as well as their haversacks’ contents. Bud replaced his worn-out brogans, which had developed holes in their soles long ago.

(Page 102)
“We’ve whipped them, General!” one of the Confederates hollered.

(Page 103)
Bud’s arrival in Huntsville went unnoticed. Apparently, the townsfolk were accustomed to seeing raggedy-clothed Confederates milling about. Once he arrived home, his wife greeted him adoringly, but it took only a moment for her to realize that something was amiss, so he explained what he had witnessed the week before, but excluded morbid details for her benefit. Shocked by the revelation, she released him to his errand, and he rode out on his buckskin gelding to deliver the sorrowful news.


Search result for 'Confederate' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 1: Chapter One
"...“Gentlemen of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, friends, and fellow citizens. Called to the difficult and responsible station of chief executive of the provisional government which you have instituted, I approach the discharge of the duties assigned to me with a humble distrust of my abilities …” ..."
"...least expect that posterity will acquit us of havin’ needlessly engaged in it. Doubly justified by the absence of wrong on our part, and by wanton aggression on the part of others, there can be no cause to doubt that the courage and patriotism of the people of the Confederate States will be found equal to any measures of defense which their honor and security may require …” ..."
56.
"... to keep quiet, he merely nodded in agreement. “We have changed the constituent parts, but not the system of government,” Jefferson Davis went on to say. “The Constitution formed by our fathers is that of these Confederate States …” Expelling a sigh, David felt his stomach rumble. ..."
"...Two quiet weeks passed. He helped his father plant rows of peas, and tilled the soil, preparing it for corn and sorghum. Their peacefulness didn’t last long, for news came that Fort Sumter, off the coast of South Carolina in Charleston Harbor, had been bombarded by Confederate forces and captured. Two days later, President Lincoln called for 75,000 volunteers, evidence that a war was now truly imminent. On April 17, Virginia seceded, and two days later, a mob of Southern sympathizers in Baltimore attacked the 6th Massachusetts Regiment while it marched through on its way to ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 2: Chapter Two
"...Following the ceremony, each officer was given a bouquet of flowers, and to each enlistee, a newly constructed Confederate uniform was distributed. The jackets were gray homespun wool with a row of nine shiny brass buttons down the front. Kepis were allotted as headwear, and brogans for footwear. Every man was instructed to bring his own firearm and ammunition if possible, as well as knives and hygienic items. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 3: Chapter Three
6.
"... and they were all walking up and down their lines, too. “Soldiers of the Confederate States of America!” the nearest pacing sergeant hollered, staring each enlistee in the eye. “I am your superior officer, Sergeant Meadows!” Bud choked a chuckle as he stood beside Hiram, who knew ..."
"...On the following day, May 6, Arkansas seceded from the Union, and on the following day, the 4th Alabama was inducted into Confederate service, mustered in for the duration of one year. Following several days of idleness, the recruits embarked yet again via train to Strasburg, Virginia, arriving on May 11. The weather had become partly cloudy, to the men’s delight. They rested in the afternoon, and prepared rations for the next ..."
"...reason why they were ordered to prepare rations in advance, for those who had failed to follow orders suffered by having empty stomachs. With four drummer boys keeping rhythm, they arrived in Winchester late in the day to a welcoming reception. The town’s residents greeted them enthusiastically by waving Confederate flags and handkerchiefs that resembled fluttering butterflies, and cheered the soldiers, who tiredly marched through town. ..."
"...The camp chaplain, William D. Chaddick, preached fervently, quoting scripture, although he distorted the content to justify their cause by inferring that the enemy was evil, and that the Confederates were right and noble: “And if thy right eye offend thee, pluck it out, and cast it from thee: for it is profitable for thee that one of thy members should perish, and not that thy whole body should be cast into hell. And if thy right hand offend ..."
"...News came that Union General George B. McClellan had driven the Confederates out of the Allegheny Mountains, thus bringing the western portion of Virginia under U.S. control. By doing so, he secured himself a nickname, “Little Napoleon.” A short time later, it was reported that the U.S. Sanitary Commission had been founded by a group of New York women who intended ..."
"...The Fourth of July was observed with a speech by President Lincoln, whose plea to Congress led to the authorized call for five hundred thousand Federal volunteers. By making such a request, Lincoln apparently had made a total declaration of war, and the Confederates took it as such. Two days later, Private Humphreys was discharged. He returned to Alabama to raise a brigade, electing himself as colonel. ..."
"...Storm clouds mushroomed, thickening to a dark gray by dusk, and obscured the setting sun. Around 10:30 p.m., the Confederate soldiers arrived at Piedmont Station in a miserable, torrential downpour. They sloshed through mud while trying to keep their gunpowder dry. Completely exhausted, the men struggled to obtain what little rest they could under their temporary shelters, which failed to provide much remedy from the rain. At midnight, they ..."
"...After two hours of quiet, the Yankees resumed their assault, and the Confederates fought off several Union advances. Men in colorful garb fashioned after French Algerian Zouaves attacked first, but were driven back. Then came, one at a time, three other regiments, but all eventually broke and ran. Their uniforms caused confusion, for men on either side were dressed in both blue ..."
"...The men spied two unknown regiments clad in gray, approaching in a line on their right. Assuming they were Confederates, the Alabamians signaled by raising their hands to their caps while giving the password, “our homes,” and the unknown regiment signaled back by mirroring the action. Law ordered his soldiers to form a line behind the new arrivals. As soon as the 4th unfurled their flags, they were quickly ..."
"...Soldiers from other regiments wandered into camp, describing the turmoil that had swirled around them. Brigadier General J. E. B. Stuart, Confederate cavalry commander, had hurled his cavaliers into the New York Zouaves, and as the Yankees retreated, all hell broke loose. Civilians from Washington City had driven over to witness the battle, bringing along their ladies, complete with picnic lunches, parasols, and fine carriages. However, when the Federals “skedaddled,” they ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 4: Chapter Four
"...at Camp Jones marched by in full uniform, complete with glistening bayonets and polished boots. Next came the glass hearse, decorated with white plumes and crepe, drawn by four white horses draped in black. The coffin lay inside, swathed with black cloth. On top of it was displayed a Confederate flag, the deceased’s sword, and wreaths of fresh flowers and evergreens. Pallbearers including both citizens and soldiers walked on either side of the hearse while it made its way down the street. Behind it, an infantryman rode Old Battalion, who had come home with his master. Members of the ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 5: Chapter Five
"...According to newspaper reports, the USS San Jacinto stopped the British ship Trent in international waters, and arrested two Confederate ambassadors: J. M. Mason, who was commissioner to England, and the commissioner to France, John Slidell. The men were taken to Boston and imprisoned, but when the news broke, public outcry prevailed, so Lincoln felt compelled to release the two captives, excusing his disregard for foreign policy by saying ..."
"...School resumed, but classes were intermittent, since the weather dictated participation and attendance. Josie brought home a new grammar book, which focused on the war effort and Confederate superiority over the Northern invaders. The new readers were also chock-full of anti-Yankee sentiment. David found them amusing, as did his little sister, although the propaganda they exuded was somewhat disturbing, in that they promoted the murder of Yankees. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 6: Chapter Six
"...The soldiers spent their days drilling, constructing corduroy roads, and tending to what little livestock the camp contained. A few of the men acquired pets, including dogs, a goat, and a few chickens. Those who were fortunate enough to secure Confederate currency used their hard-earned cash on overpriced luxuries provided by sutlers’ row, or “robbers’ row,” as they referred to it. ..."
"...The 4th Alabama received word that Stonewall Jackson had attacked Union forces in the Shenandoah Valley, forcing the Yankees to rush back to Washington and defend the city from a possible Confederate attack. They also learned that Nathan Bedford Forrest’s men were on the move in Tennessee, and great concern arose over the possible invasion of Alabama by Union troops. A significant battle had taken place at Pea Ridge, Arkansas, with triumphant Union troops seizing control of the Missouri River. And ..."
"...Johnston relocated the 4th Alabama to join with the main army south of the Rappahannock and moved it in the direction of Richmond. In early March, he learned that McClellan was encroaching, so he hastily transferred his troops from Centreville, leaving behind half-cooked food and property belonging to the Confederate army. He moved his men south of the Rappahannock, but not before leaving Quaker guns behind in empty earthworks to deter his rival. The “guns” were actually logs that had been cut and painted to resemble cannon snouts. ..."
"...for her. She brushed the sentiment aside, considering it to be nostalgia, and showed the letter to her brother, who flushed upon reading it. David knew that Thomas was two years his senior and had more obligations to enlist, since he had a brother and four cousins who were Confederate soldiers. Regardless, he was envious, and although he obediently performed his duties at home, he still wished to be a soldier. ..."
"...from Huntsville. Reports of the battle were carried in by courier. David eagerly hovered around Ben Johnson’s in anticipation of incoming telegrams, and while he was there, a courier rode in. According to the messenger, some twenty thousand troops were converging on the area, and the fighting was bloody. Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston had been killed, and the Union army had been chased back to Pittsburg Landing on the Tennessee River. From the looks of things, the Rebels were victorious, according to the dispatch rider, who immediately set off toward Huntsville to retrieve more information. Waving his hat ..."
"...A few days later, on Thursday, April 10, Jake accompanied David to the mercantile, where they received terrible news. The Yankees had won the battle at Shiloh, forcing the defeated Confederates to retreat south. Rumor had it that the Federals were giving chase by also heading in their direction. The boys rode home to inform their parents, and all braced themselves for the worst, hiding valuables and preparing extra food, just in case they had to escape from invading Yankee ..."
"...New officers were chosen. Ivander Law was reelected as colonel, and Charles Scott as major. In all, twenty-five officers were replaced. It wasn’t surprising to the men that Law retained his command. He had become close to Confederate General John Bell Hood as a strategic career move and had also positioned himself favorably with influential military personnel and politicians. The remaining North Alabamians reenlisted for three years, hoping that their service wouldn’t be needed for that duration. ..."
"...Newspapers reported that Fort Pulaski, located at the mouth of the Savannah River, had fallen, and Union forces captured it by using rifled cannon. They also printed that, on April 12, what was being called the “Great Locomotive Chase” took place. Several Federal volunteers had attempted to steal the Confederate locomotive General, but were discovered as they headed north from Big Shanty, Georgia. The Confederate crew of the Texas chased the General with their train in reverse, and finally captured it north of Ringgold. The story made great fodder for adventure-seeking readers. Hiram knew it wouldn’t be long before ..."
"...Miss Emily shook her head. “It’s been horrible,” she stated blatantly. “The Confederate soldiers who were hidin’ in town have all run off. My li’l’ brother and I can’t attend school, and the businesses have all closed. The Huntsville Democrat has been taken over, and those heathen Yankees have renamed it the Huntsville Reveille.” ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 7: Chapter Seven
"...when morning came, only the private returned. Sergeant Hartley had been shot, and the private brought back his bullet-pierced roll book to prove it. Hiram and the rest of Company I once again felt sorrow, for although Hartley had been from Connecticut, he was well liked, and a true Confederate patriot. ..."
"...Early the following morning, the Alabamians traveled eight miles to the beat of their drums toward Seven Pines and their foe. The Stars and Bars, St. Andrews Cross, the regimental colors, and the Bonnie Blue Flag all flew gallantly above the advancing Confederates. Once they arrived, they saw that the Union army had been driven out, for all that remained were their empty tents. Throughout the course of the day, the 4th was maneuvered to different locations, but still didn’t see any fighting. By evening, they had been placed on the Richmond ..."
"...At daybreak, the Confederates waited for the battle to resume. Word spread throughout camp that General Johnston had been replaced by General Smith, who hesitated in bringing on an advancing attack. The men wondered about this proxy, because it was known that General Smith was in ill health. Talk of the wounded reached ..."
"...While the hours ticked by, the soldiers grew restless, but knew there was nothing they could do. Early in the afternoon, General Lee arrived. The men soon learned that he had been given control of the Confederate army, and that General Smith was relieved of command. Lee promptly renamed his soldiers. What had previously been known as the “Army of the Potomac” became the “Army of Northern Virginia.” For his first act of authority, he commanded his troops to “strike the tent,” and returned them to ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 8: Chapter Eight
"...General McClellan moved his vast army to the south side of the Chickahominy River, in an attempt to confront Lee below Richmond. While he was there, the commander of Robert E. Lee’s Confederate cavalry, General J. E. B. Stuart, received fame by riding around McClellan’s troops. Originally ordered to reconnoiter the Army of the Potomac’s movements, Stuart and his cavaliers decided to risk their lives by going around, instead of returning to Richmond the way they had come, and their successful exploit ..."
"...Confederate General Whiting rode forward, and soon the bridge was repaired, enabling the men to cross. The Confederates shelled the woods to make sure no Yankees were waiting to ambush them, and then they cautiously proceeded, clearing debris from their path while they forged ahead. Generals Ewell and A. P. ..."
9.
"... upon them. Lieutenant Colonel McLemore, who had been promoted to the 4th Alabama in May, appeared at the front of the line. Marching backward, he faced his Confederates and loudly ordered the march: “Guide center, keep in step! One, two, three, four! One, two, three, four!” The 4th ..."
"...The Confederates jumped into the Union breastworks, stampeding like cattle. In response, the Federals broke and ran as the Alabamians thundered up the ascent to the second line of defense. The Yankees from the first line swept through the second, and all turned tail. The Rebels kept shrieking, cursing, and running ..."
"...catch his breath, watching the smoke clear. He looked around for Bud until he finally saw him walking toward him. The two congratulated each other amidst their shouting, jubilant comrades. As darkness fell, the Yankees escaped across the Chickahominy. General Lee was rewarded with his first victory, and the Confederates’ shock tactics had proved to be successful. ..."
"...or missing. Jim Harrison of Company D received admiration for his ability to capture twenty-three men and an officer. In the excitement of battle, he had unintentionally jumped into a trench filled with Federals, so he shot one and took the rest prisoner. Among the Yankees captured by the Confederates was Colonel McLemore’s old regiment, the 8th U.S. Infantry, which he had resigned from at the onset of the war. ..."
"...The injured Confederates were carried to Richmond, where nearly every house was a hospital, and every woman served as a nurse. General McClellan retreated to his gunboats on the James River, while General Jackson moved his troops to Harrison’s Landing. They arrived on July 3, and remained there for five more days, ..."
"...Colonel Turchin’s men had been having a field day in Athens. Aside from their uncontrolled outrages against the citizens, the Yankees singled out a slave named Matthew Gray. They forced Gray and a captured Confederate soldier to mount a mule, and after tying their feet together under the animal, they drove the mule into the Tennessee River. Fortunately for the victims, the mule swam to the other side, and the two men managed to free themselves instead of drowning, as was the intention. The ..."
"...Although Mitchel was gone, his family, who had arrived on July 12, remained in Huntsville. According to Billy Ryan, they could be seen riding around town in their carriage as though flaunting their presence in enemy territory. On one occasion, they cut off the funeral procession of a murdered Confederate picket. The Mitchels were disliked from the start, because they helped themselves to anyone’s property that they so desired. The citizens couldn’t be rid of them soon enough, but it took several weeks for them to get their wish. In the meantime, Mitchel was replaced by Major General Lovell ..."
"...in Decatur and made it their mission to report Rebels who were hiding in the hills. Union Colonel Abel Streight decided to pursue the offenders, so he took a regiment of infantry and one company of cavalry into the mountains to hunt them down. The cavalry was attacked by Confederate scouts, so they returned to Decatur, but the infantry was successful in capturing the fugitives, and forced them to enlist with the 1st Alabama Cavalry. On July 10, they were inducted into the Union Army. ..."
"...the farm. He waited alone as night fell, watching stars shower overhead in the dark sky, and recalled the same occurrence a year ago, when he and Jake had lounged upon the Kimballs’ veranda, contemplating the war and their trip to Huntsville, where they first caught sight of Wheeler’s Confederate army preparing for war. ..."
"...General Lee’s Confederates spent July and the first part of August recuperating. Jackson moved to Gordonsville, where he encountered Pope, and deceived the Union general by lighting numerous fires to make his forces appear larger than they were. This stratagem proved effective, because Pope retreated, but not before Jackson captured a portion ..."
"...Two days later, the Rebels continued their pursuit of the Federals. They reached the Rappahannock, and moved upriver under constant shelling from their adversaries. The 4th Alabama was ordered to the front of the advancing Confederates. They charged, driving the Yankees into the river. As a result, many who couldn’t swim drowned, while others were killed or captured. ..."
92.
"... their progression resumed. The North Alabamians came to a crossing, where they discovered what had held them up. A young man in full Confederate uniform, but without shoes, dangled from an overhead branch, his lifeless body swaying at the end of a horse’s reins. “That’s somebody’s ..."
"...Late that evening, the corps’ two brigades were positioned to advance through the narrow gap, which was only wide enough to allow for railroad tracks and a road. The steep, craggy sides prevented the Confederates from seeing in any direction but straight ahead. They chased the retreating Yankees, firing their rifles and muskets continuously while they pursued, the clatter of their guns echoing through the gap. The 4th was directed to climb the slope in an attempt to flank their retreating enemy, and after ..."
97.
"... sucking on a lemon as he sat atop Little Sorrel. The Confederates continued to drive the Yankees until they were close, and then waited for their artillery to arrive. Once positioned on the field, the cannons exploded into the Union soldiers. The men were forced to tolerate heavy artillery ..."
"...to his rescue, and the Yankees were finally forced to retreat, leaving their dead and dying on the field. All the while, artillery from both sides continued firing canister and grapeshot. Billowing smoke hung over the infantrymen as opposing sides shot at each other. Like the previous day, the Confederates again drove their enemies, until nightfall hindered them. ..."
"...Later in the day, a soldier from Company A returned to camp, explaining that he had been captured by Sigel’s Dutch, who were really Germans, but in the Federals’ haste to depart, he was left behind. The Confederates were fed better rations than they had been given since leaving Richmond. Musicians in Hiram’s company, Foggarty, Halsey, and Hickey, celebrated the victory by playing Irish music with instruments they found abandoned on the battlefield by the Union army. That evening, Bud and several others returned to camp. Happy ..."
134.
"... about.” David nodded as he recollected the conversation. “So the Huntsville Democrat is back in business?” “Sure is. Except now it’s called the Huntsville Confederate.” “That seems right fittin’.” “And the Unionists in town left with the Yankees, too. Reckon they were ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 9: Chapter Nine
"...The Confederates heard that General Pope had been replaced by none other than McClellan, who had turned his Grand Army of the Potomac away from Washington, and was headed back in the direction of Fredericktown. The Alabamians reached Hagerstown, where they awaited news from Jackson. While there, they discovered that the ..."
"...was due to a blunder made during the previous week. A copy of Confidential Special Order No. 191, wrapped around three cigars, was discovered by a Union soldier in Fredericktown, and given to General McClellan. The order outlined Lee’s intentions, so McClellan reacted by attempting to cut off the Confederate army, which was scattered from Harpers Ferry to Hagerstown. The Alabamians raced to the aid of General Hill, who was subjected to protecting the gap with his small army until reinforcements arrived. ..."
"...The Confederates advanced into the trees, skirmishing with their enemies as they drove them out. Captain Scruggs, who fell wounded, was quickly replaced by Captain Robbins. Realizing that they were at an advantage, the Rebels shot down scores of Yankees while concealing themselves in the cover of trees, fighting savagely despite ..."
"...Yankee artillery fired into General Hood’s right flank and rear, causing the Rebels to fall back. The ground was scattered with bodies, most of which were clad in blue. Many Confederate soldiers had exhausted their ammunition when Lieutenant Stewart informed them that they had been fighting for nearly three hours straight. Fearing that the enemy would chase after them, they quickly re-formed, but discovered their haste was unnecessary, as the Yankees failed to respond. The Alabamians took much-needed time to ..."
"...During the following days, reports came in that the battle was declared a draw, although General Lee pulled his troops back onto Confederate soil. The cornfield that the Alabamians had marched across was mowed down by bullets, as though cut with a scythe. The 4th Alabama came out better than most, with only eight dead and thirty-six wounded. Hood’s Texans lost nearly 80 percent of their troops, as well as their colors. ..."
80.
"... McClellan attempted to chase after the Rebels, and some of his troops captured four Confederate cannons. On the morning of September 20, the Federals were driven back across the Potomac, where they remained. Apparently, McClellan was satisfied with himself enough to sit back on his laurels. ..."
"...Two days later, on September 22, Abraham Lincoln announced his Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, freeing slaves in Confederate states, but not in Union or neutral states. No blacks were allowed into Lincoln’s home state of Illinois, and the president didn’t contest it. The Rebels thought him a hypocrite, since he was freeing slaves he had no control over, but the ones he had the power to liberate ..."
"...On October 8, the Battle of Perryville took place, which was Kentucky’s only major battle thus far, between Union General Buell and Confederate General Braxton Bragg. Because the Republicans thought Buell was proslavery for wanting to protect Southerners’ property, he was relieved of his command. On October 9, General Longstreet was promoted to lieutenant general. A day later, so was General Jackson, and on that same day, General Stuart began his raid ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
"...David stayed informed by acquiring current editions of the Huntsville Confederate, which had been reduced down to only one sheet folded into two pages, due to the paper shortage. Major changes were taking place within both armies. As of November 10, Alabama had supplied over sixty thousand men to the Confederate cause. President Lincoln replaced McClellan yet again, this time ..."
"...taken near Sharpsburg by a photographer named Alexander Gardner. Even though they were drawings, the pictures were disturbing nevertheless, and depicted crumpled corpses slumped together like potato sacks, laid out in front of a small white building, along with broken caissons, dead mules, overturned limbers, and more pictures of Confederate bodies. It seemed to him that there were no deceased Union soldiers lying about in any of the pictures. Although he knew his father wasn’t among the casualties, he was still appalled by the drawings. He had seen photos of corpses post mortem before, but nothing as horrendous as ..."
"...to reflect, he thought back to the previous month’s events. The 4th Alabama had abandoned their encampment for Culpeper Court House, and stayed there until November 22, when Lee discovered that Burnside was headed north from Richmond, so he assembled his troops near the quaint town of Fredericksburg. The Confederate army swelled to almost twice its size, due to returning soldiers who had become ill prior to their march into Maryland. Remaining on the south side of the icy Rappahannock River, the Rebels gazed at the church spires that rose up from the town like bony, skeletal fingers, reaching ..."
"...deserted homes that housed fine paintings, extensive libraries, and lovely furniture, or they stood guard outside on the piazzas, and in the immaculate sculptured gardens, gazing across the river at the Union soldiers’ tents. They noticed how finely outfitted the Yankees were in their splendid blue uniforms, but the Confederates, in contrast, were clothed in ragged, tattered, dingy butternut. ..."
"...the river. The Yankee bands played new songs he had never heard before. One sounded like “John Brown’s Body,” but the words had been changed. This, he learned, was the Union army’s new anthem, “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” He didn’t appreciate the lyrics, since they equated the Confederates to devils, but listened with interest, nonetheless. Another Yankee song they played repetitively was called the “Battle Cry of Freedom.” He liked that one better, but it still didn’t make his spirit soar like “Dixie” did. The Federals played “The Star-Spangled Banner” and “Hail Columbia,” songs the Southerners once ..."
"...comrades could see Fredericksburg set ablaze. Hysterical citizens ran out into the streets, scattering into the nearby woods. Although the weather was mild for December, Hiram knew that they would likely freeze come nightfall. The thought of those destitute women and children wrenched his heart. After some time, the Confederates’ efforts to repel the Yankees proved futile. The Federals started over the river in boats and soon began filing across their pontoon bridges. By nightfall, they had taken the town. General Lee arranged his troops, comprised of the brigades of Jackson, Longstreet, A. P. Hill, and McLaws, as well ..."
"...North Alabamians awoke to hear Federal bands playing, and the Union infantrymen scuffling about while they moved, but he couldn’t see anything, due to heavy fog. The 4th marched back to their previous position, where they discovered brisk skirmishing and artillery fire taking place. Burnside had begun harassing the Confederates but was unable to accomplish anything. ..."
"...They came up from the town as though on parade, and appeared to be unstoppable, like they would keep going over and through the Confederate line. With grape, shell, and shot, the Rebel guns immediately began their deadly work, pouring a storm of lead into the advancing foe, and they blew holes into the dark, solid columns, which were filled in like water rushing around a fractured dam. The thunderous salvos of cannonade shook ..."
125.
"... either. They fell back in confusion. The Irish Brigade advanced, hollering “Ireland forever” in Gaelic. “Erin go bragh!” they bellowed in unison while advancing, but they were forced to retreat under the murderous fire of the Confederate guns. With his own comrades entrenched on ..."
"...either side of him, Hiram and the North Alabamians observed the fighting. Burnside reignited his attack in earnest at two o’clock by shelling another regiment of Rebels, who stood their ground in a sunken road behind a stone wall. One advance after another tried in vain to break the Confederate stance, but all were unable to penetrate the line. The Yankees marched up the hill until there were so many of their dead clogging the battlefield that the advancing Federals were unable to climb over them. The frozen ground in the sunken road gave way to mud and slush ..."
"...Shells started flying at them, whistling and bursting all around. While they ran, shot and canister hit the ground, sending a torrent of dirt in their faces, and creating huge craters that they frantically zigzagged to avoid. The Confederates dashed up the hill, escaping the turmoil. Bud glanced back over his shoulder. He saw a shell fly straight at Hiram. It hit him. Hiram’s body exploded like a ripe tomato. ..."
"...Bud could only speculate. Besides corpses dressed in blue, some wore Zouave uniforms, while others adorned their trappings with Kelly green. Blue Hugh said they were with the Irish Brigade, because he had heard that they wore green boxwood sprigs in their caps to display their heritage. The barefoot Confederates immediately set to work, relieving the rigid bodies of their footwear and clothing, as well as their haversacks’ contents. Bud replaced his worn-out brogans, which had developed holes in their soles long ago. ..."
193.
"... to congratulate his men. Although Bud was heartbroken, he still managed a faint smile as Lee saluted them. “We’ve whipped them, General!” one of the Confederates hollered. Lee nodded in response without displaying an ounce of emotion. He informed the men that those who could go home ..."
"...Bud’s arrival in Huntsville went unnoticed. Apparently, the townsfolk were accustomed to seeing raggedy-clothed Confederates milling about. Once he arrived home, his wife greeted him adoringly, but it took only a moment for her to realize that something was amiss, so he explained what he had witnessed the week before, but excluded morbid details for her benefit. Shocked by the revelation, she released him ..."

Search result for 'Confederate' in the FAQs of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

There were no results for 'Confederate' in the FAQs of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Reviews

"I read the book. Good book! Can't wait to read the second one. ..."

More Reviews
Share on Facebook Tweet This
Buy this book:
Visit the
A Beautiful Glittering Lie
website
Join J D R Hawkins on Google+
Get a Book Preview website