A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'corp' mean?

Find out what corp means. Corp is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

corp

(pronounced kohr or korz) A very large group of soldiers led by a (Confederate) lieutenant general or a (Union) major general, and designated by Roman numerals, such as the IX Corps. Confederate corps were frequently named after their commanding general, such as Jackson's Corps.

1 company = 50-100 men
10 companies = 1 regiment
4+ regiments = 1 brigade
2-5 brigades = 1 division
2+ divisions = 1 corp
1+ corps = 1 army

In my novel, A Beautiful Glittering Lie, the term "corp" is used as follows:

(Page 74)
At one point, while the men sat by the roadside, waiting for their scouts and pickets to clear the path ahead, an ambulance drawn by a pair of fine bay horses pulled up. The driver realized too late that he was in the midst of the enemy. Soldiers piled into the ambulance, relieving the driver of any foodstuffs he had. Soon the road was cleared, the men marched on, and the stunned driver, who was with Union General Porter’s corps, was taken prisoner.

(Page 76)
The injured Confederates were carried to Richmond, where nearly every house was a hospital, and every woman served as a nurse. General McClellan retreated to his gunboats on the James River, while General Jackson moved his troops to Harrison’s Landing. They arrived on July 3, and remained there for five more days, until General Lee ordered his army back to Richmond, and restructured it into two corps. The 4th Alabama fell under the command of Generals Lee and Longstreet, and General Jackson led the other corps. General Whiting was transferred, so General Hood took his command. While camped at Richmond, the men acquired new clothing, cooking utensils, kettles, frying pans, and “spiders,” or skillets.

(Page 79)
By August 20, both corps joined together, and continued on across the Rapidan River toward Culpeper Court House. Pope discovered their advance, so he withdrew across the Rappahannock. Once the Rebels arrived, the people of Culpeper came out to greet them, cheering and waving flags in welcome. Some told horror stories of how they had been abused by Pope’s Union army. Others described how Pope’s own men despised him because of his arrogant, pompous nature, and how Pope’s bombastic braggadocio deflated his troops’ morale.

(Page 79)
Jackson’s corps crossed the Rappahannock in an attempt to flank the Union army, while General Lee’s portion stayed behind to keep Pope occupied. The Alabamians learned of Jackson’s departure a few days later, but didn’t flinch in their determination. The fact that they were immensely outnumbered didn’t deter them.

(Page 80)
Making their way through intermittent, intense humidity, one-hundred-degree heat, and drenching rains, General Lee’s corps advanced across the Rappahannock on August 26. Over the course of three days, they ventured through the abandoned towns of Orleans and White Plains, all the while being harassed by enemy fire, until they reached Thoroughfare Gap in the Bull Run Mountains. The Alabamians took up the rear. After marching for a few miles, the corps came to a standstill. Finally, their progression resumed.

(Page 80)
Late that evening, the corps’ two brigades were positioned to advance through the narrow gap, which was only wide enough to allow for railroad tracks and a road. The steep, craggy sides prevented the Confederates from seeing in any direction but straight ahead. They chased the retreating Yankees, firing their rifles and muskets continuously while they pursued, the clatter of their guns echoing through the gap. The 4th was directed to climb the slope in an attempt to flank their retreating enemy, and after much difficulty, they succeeded at nightfall. The men bivouacked, where they sustained themselves on hardtack and tobacco.

(Page 80)
In the morning, they discovered that Pope had escaped during the night, so they resumed their march, traveling nine miles to join up with General Jackson. They continued on through Gainesville, and ended up at the Warrenton Pike, where they turned toward the Stone Bridge over Bull Run River. The terrain was familiar, for the men had fought their first battle there a year prior. When they finally reached Jackson, his corps welcomed them down the line with hearty cheers. Hiram saw Jackson himself, sucking on a lemon as he sat atop Little Sorrel.

(Page 81)
Colonel Law ordered his men to halt. He then positioned them across the pike, but at 1:00 a.m., General Hood, Law’s superior, ordered them to abandon their position, along with the captured howitzer, and return to their original position. Through the course of the night, they obtained little sleep, because the loud banging of guns, roar of cannons, and tramp of infantrymen prevented it. By the time the sun rose on the morning of Saturday, August 30, all of the Rebel corps had reached the field, extending from Groveton across the pike to Bull Run below the Stone Bridge.

Search result for 'corp' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 2: Chapter Two
"...oration given by one of the officers. A banner sewn by the Ladies Aid Society in Huntsville was presented to the new company by Miss Carrie Gordon, who was appropriately dressed in Southern homespun. It was accepted by Private E. S. McClung, the color sergeant, who advanced with his corporals and gave a stirring speech. ..."

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Chapter 6: Chapter Six
30.
"... Jake said, pointing his index finger. “That must be a general. See all them bars on his sleeve?” “He ain’t a general,” replied David. “He looks too young. Maybe he’s a corporal.” “Is that a rank jist below a general?” “Reckon so. I dunno.” “Yoo-hoo!” The boys both ..."

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Chapter 8: Chapter Eight
"...horses pulled up. The driver realized too late that he was in the midst of the enemy. Soldiers piled into the ambulance, relieving the driver of any foodstuffs he had. Soon the road was cleared, the men marched on, and the stunned driver, who was with Union General Porter’s corps, was taken prisoner. ..."
"...served as a nurse. General McClellan retreated to his gunboats on the James River, while General Jackson moved his troops to Harrison’s Landing. They arrived on July 3, and remained there for five more days, until General Lee ordered his army back to Richmond, and restructured it into two corps. The 4th Alabama fell under the command of Generals Lee and Longstreet, and General Jackson led the other corps. General Whiting was transferred, so General Hood took his command. While camped at Richmond, the men acquired new clothing, cooking utensils, kettles, frying pans, and “spiders,” or skillets. ..."
"...By August 20, both corps joined together, and continued on across the Rapidan River toward Culpeper Court House. Pope discovered their advance, so he withdrew across the Rappahannock. Once the Rebels arrived, the people of Culpeper came out to greet them, cheering and waving flags in welcome. Some told horror stories of how they ..."
"...Jackson’s corps crossed the Rappahannock in an attempt to flank the Union army, while General Lee’s portion stayed behind to keep Pope occupied. The Alabamians learned of Jackson’s departure a few days later, but didn’t flinch in their determination. The fact that they were immensely outnumbered didn’t deter them. ..."
"...Making their way through intermittent, intense humidity, one-hundred-degree heat, and drenching rains, General Lee’s corps advanced across the Rappahannock on August 26. Over the course of three days, they ventured through the abandoned towns of Orleans and White Plains, all the while being harassed by enemy fire, until they reached Thoroughfare Gap in the Bull Run Mountains. The Alabamians took up the rear. After ..."
"...Late that evening, the corps’ two brigades were positioned to advance through the narrow gap, which was only wide enough to allow for railroad tracks and a road. The steep, craggy sides prevented the Confederates from seeing in any direction but straight ahead. They chased the retreating Yankees, firing their rifles and muskets continuously ..."
"...up with General Jackson. They continued on through Gainesville, and ended up at the Warrenton Pike, where they turned toward the Stone Bridge over Bull Run River. The terrain was familiar, for the men had fought their first battle there a year prior. When they finally reached Jackson, his corps welcomed them down the line with hearty cheers. Hiram saw Jackson himself, sucking on a lemon as he sat atop Little Sorrel. ..."
"...howitzer, and return to their original position. Through the course of the night, they obtained little sleep, because the loud banging of guns, roar of cannons, and tramp of infantrymen prevented it. By the time the sun rose on the morning of Saturday, August 30, all of the Rebel corps had reached the field, extending from Groveton across the pike to Bull Run below the Stone Bridge. ..."

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Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
"...the mercantile, David opened the publication to discover contents within it that alarmed, yet intrigued him. Inside the pages were engravings, copies of photographs that had been taken near Sharpsburg by a photographer named Alexander Gardner. Even though they were drawings, the pictures were disturbing nevertheless, and depicted crumpled corpses slumped together like potato sacks, laid out in front of a small white building, along with broken caissons, dead mules, overturned limbers, and more pictures of Confederate bodies. It seemed to him that there were no deceased Union soldiers lying about in any of the pictures. Although he knew ..."
"...what they saw that the Union army had suffered almost complete annihilation. Some of the Federals died trying to use their comrades’ bodies as shields. What it must have been like to lie in wait while bullets thudded into the bodies of their friends, Bud could only speculate. Besides corpses dressed in blue, some wore Zouave uniforms, while others adorned their trappings with Kelly green. Blue Hugh said they were with the Irish Brigade, because he had heard that they wore green boxwood sprigs in their caps to display their heritage. The barefoot Confederates immediately set to work, relieving ..."

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"The history is intertwined ingeniously into the plot. It is well plotted and the narrative moves along at nice clip...."

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