A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'drill' mean?

Find out what drill means. Drill is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

drill

To practice marching and maneuvering in military formations, and to go through the steps involved in loading, firing, and handling a weapon. Soldiers drilled relentlessly when they weren't in battle. In my novel, A Beautiful Glittering Lie, the term "drill" is used as such:

(Page 16)
By April 20, every state in the Confederacy was bracing for war. When David rode to the town of Arab for supplies, he couldn’t believe his eyes. Excitement filled the streets. People hustled about, and small groups of men and boys, firearms in hand, were practicing drills. Two would-be soldiers attempted to play a fife and drum. A newspaper boy hollered out the latest news from an intersection. David’s heart pounded with exhilaration. His moment was close at hand. When he returned home to report the news, to his amazement, his father seemed disinterested, said very little about the event, and told him to tend to his duties.

(Page 30)
Soon, their situation drastically changed, as more drills and fatigue details were continually expected of them. The men were driven through a gauntlet of routines. Following reveille at 4:00 a.m., they were drilled as an entire regiment from 4:30 until 7:00 a.m., when they broke for breakfast. General inspection was at 8:00 a.m., and the company drill lasted from 9:00 until noon. After midday break, another drill session commenced, lasting from 2:30 until 5:30. A dress parade immediately followed. Supper was served at 6:30, roll call was at 9:00, and tattoo was at 9:30, when all lights were extinguished. Most drill sessions were led by Colonel Jones’ protégé, Private Humphreys.

(Page 30)
Within a few weeks, the infantrymen became disenchanted with their new colonel, for he rigorously sent them through routine drills, and relentlessly imposed discipline that the North Alabamians found repetitious and boring. Anxious to fight the Yankees, they grew resentful of the monotony forced upon them, and they were concerned about the colonel’s lack of fighting experience while he had served in the Mexican War. The soldiers’ disgruntlement led to their passing a petition around camp that called for Jones to resign.

(Pages 40-41)
Digging his heels into Joe Boy’s flanks, they rode toward the edge of the city. They turned a corner, and noticing a small division of soldiers marching ahead, they decided to follow, staying back far enough so as not to be detected. The soldiers kept marching to a wooded area along Big Spring Branch, where hundreds of others were drilling. Behind the soldiers, rows of horse stables lined the edge of the woods. David and Jake slid off Joe Boy, tied him to a shrub, and stealthily stole to the top of an incline. They looked down upon the regiment, watching as the group they had followed fell in, took their place among the others, and obeyed their commander’s orders to “About face.” The men moved in unison, responding to each call the officer made. He hollered, “Attention,” and they stood erect in anticipation of his next command. The officer barked other orders. The men lifted their fire irons simultaneously, raised them as though they were taking aim, and placed them back down when the officer yelled, “At ease.”

(Pages 55-56)
The soldiers spent their days drilling, constructing corduroy roads, and tending to what little livestock the camp contained. A few of the men acquired pets, including dogs, a goat, and a few chickens. Those who were fortunate enough to secure Confederate currency used their hard-earned cash on overpriced luxuries provided by sutlers’ row, or “robbers’ row,” as they referred to it.

Search result for 'drill' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 1: Chapter One
"...By April 20, every state in the Confederacy was bracing for war. When David rode to the town of Arab for supplies, he couldn’t believe his eyes. Excitement filled the streets. People hustled about, and small groups of men and boys, firearms in hand, were practicing drills. Two would-be soldiers attempted to play a fife and drum. A newspaper boy hollered out the latest news from an intersection. David’s heart pounded with exhilaration. His moment was close at hand. When he returned home to report the news, to his amazement, his father seemed disinterested, said very ..."

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Chapter 3: Chapter Three
"...Soon, their situation drastically changed, as more drills and fatigue details were continually expected of them. The men were driven through a gauntlet of routines. Following reveille at 4:00 a.m., they were drilled as an entire regiment from 4:30 until 7:00 a.m., when they broke for breakfast. General inspection was at 8:00 a.m., and the company drill ..."
"...Within a few weeks, the infantrymen became disenchanted with their new colonel, for he rigorously sent them through routine drills, and relentlessly imposed discipline that the North Alabamians found repetitious and boring. Anxious to fight the Yankees, they grew resentful of the monotony forced upon them, and they were concerned about the colonel’s lack of fighting experience while he had served in the Mexican War. The soldiers’ disgruntlement led ..."

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Chapter 4: Chapter Four
"...the edge of the city. They turned a corner, and noticing a small division of soldiers marching ahead, they decided to follow, staying back far enough so as not to be detected. The soldiers kept marching to a wooded area along Big Spring Branch, where hundreds of others were drilling. Behind the soldiers, rows of horse stables lined the edge of the woods. David and Jake slid off Joe Boy, tied him to a shrub, and stealthily stole to the top of an incline. They looked down upon the regiment, watching as the group they had followed fell in, ..."

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Chapter 6: Chapter Six
"...The soldiers spent their days drilling, constructing corduroy roads, and tending to what little livestock the camp contained. A few of the men acquired pets, including dogs, a goat, and a few chickens. Those who were fortunate enough to secure Confederate currency used their hard-earned cash on overpriced luxuries provided by sutlers’ row, or “robbers’ ..."

Search result for 'drill' in the FAQs of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

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Search result for 'drill' in Glossary of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

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