A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'Federal' mean?

Find out what Federal means. Federal is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Federal

A soldier who was loyal to the Union, or the United States of America during the Civil War. Also referred to as a Unionist, Northerner, and Yankee. In my novel, A Beautiful Glittering Lie, the term "Federal" is used as follows:

(Page 31)
During the month of May, the Confederacy’s capital moved from Montgomery to Richmond, and another southern state, North Carolina, seceded. Hiram learned that the reason for his regiment’s relocation was because Union forces had moved into Virginia and seized Alexandria, which was nearly seventy miles away. Although the situation seemed to be worsening, strangely enough, visitors from Huntsville steadily arrived to see their boys, bringing gifts and letters. Citizens from home temporarily took their own places in the ranks as privates, readying for the fight, but the Yankees failed to appear, and rumors of the Federals’ impending advances proved to be false.

(Page 32)
The Fourth of July was observed with a speech by President Lincoln, whose plea to Congress led to the authorized call for five hundred thousand Federal volunteers. By making such a request, Lincoln apparently had made a total declaration of war, and the Confederates took it as such. Two days later, Private Humphreys was discharged. He returned to Alabama to raise a brigade, electing himself as colonel.

(Page 33)
The men rushed over the fence and advanced at a double quick to the top of the hill. Colonel Jones ordered them to lie down just below the crest, to fire, load, and fire again. The Federals became entrenched only about one hundred yards from where Hiram and his comrades were positioned.

(Page 34)
General Bee ordered his men to retreat to a nearby hill. The Rebels fell behind it, and fortified the hill. Surprisingly, the field began to grow quiet, except for the frantic wails of injured soldiers. To the Alabamians’ relief, the Federals were retreating. With one hand, Hiram withdrew his pocket watch, and wiped sweat from his brow with the other. Clicking the timepiece open, he saw that it was nearly five o’clock. The battle had gone on for seven hours.

(Page 35)
Later in the day, it was learned that General Bee had died from wounds he received. The white clapboard house at the center of the battle belonged to an invalid old woman by the name of Judith Carter Henry. Unable to leave her bed, she had been riddled with bullets. The Federals were commanded by Brigadier General Irvin McDowell. Generals Johnston and Beauregard of the Confederacy had proven themselves a worthy foe, and apparently had defeated the Union soldiers. Hiram and his comrades hoped that, by showing their mettle, they would bring a rapid end to the conflict, thus winning their right to secede.

(Pages 35-36)
Soldiers from other regiments wandered into camp, describing the turmoil that had swirled around them. Brigadier General J. E. B. Stuart, Confederate cavalry commander, had hurled his cavaliers into the New York Zouaves, and as the Yankees retreated, all hell broke loose. Civilians from Washington City had driven over to witness the battle, bringing along their ladies, complete with picnic lunches, parasols, and fine carriages. However, when the Federals “skedaddled,” they almost killed the Washington elite. An artillery shell worsened the situation when it hit a wagon, clogging the road that had been their escape route. Congressman Healy was captured by the Confederates and taken prisoner. The Rebels were calling it the “Bull Run Races.”

(Page 57)
A few days later, on Thursday, April 10, Jake accompanied David to the mercantile, where they received terrible news. The Yankees had won the battle at Shiloh, forcing the defeated Confederates to retreat south. Rumor had it that the Federals were giving chase by also heading in their direction. The boys rode home to inform their parents, and all braced themselves for the worst, hiding valuables and preparing extra food, just in case they had to escape from invading Yankee soldiers.

(Page 58)
“It all started with their takin’ the trains over at the depot,” she explained. “One train got away, but they wounded the poor nigger fireman. We were soon isolated, because the telegraph lines were cut. There were about a hundred and fifty wounded men on one train who had been at the battle at Shiloh, and the Yankees took them all prisoner. Can you imagine? Those poor boys already sufferin’, and along come the Federals to keep them from their medicines.”

(Pages 58-59)
Meanwhile, the Confederacy passed the Conscription Act, which required all men aged eighteen years and older to enlist. Many felt the law was a contradiction to state sovereignty, which was what the Confederacy had been founded on. Newspapers reported that Fort Pulaski, located at the mouth of the Savannah River, had fallen, and Union forces captured it by using rifled cannon. They also printed that, on April 12, what was being called the “Great Locomotive Chase” took place. Several Federal volunteers had attempted to steal the Confederate locomotive General, but were discovered as they headed north from Big Shanty, Georgia. The Confederate crew of the Texas chased the General with their train in reverse, and finally captured it north of Ringgold. The story made great fodder for adventure-seeking readers. Hiram knew it wouldn’t be long before dime novels exploited the event, which meant his son would eagerly devour it. Still waiting to embark on an adventure of their own, the men of the 4th Alabama sat poised on their haunches, impatiently waiting for another battle. They learned that Huntsville had become occupied and vowed vengeance in whatever capacity they could manage, be it when they returned home on furlough, or sooner.

(Page 59)
The situation was worsening in Huntsville, as Union soldiers went on a rampage. Their commander, Ormsby Mitchel, turned a blind eye to his soldiers’ pilfering. Federal gunboats patrolled up and down the Tennessee River, shelling towns and settlements along the banks. The Yankees burned, plundered, and foraged from the poor displaced souls, and raiding parties became more frequent. When David learned of the abomination, he considered joining up with a local group of Rebels who were retaliating. These guerrillas, as they were known, were a force to be reckoned with, for even though their group was small, they were fiercely lethal.

(Page 63)
A few of the Federals heard his voice. They turned to look, but David and Jake quickly backed into the shadows to avoid being detected. The Union soldiers filed past.

(Page 68)
Because the position of the regiment was on open ground, it moved at twilight toward the cover of trees and the abandoned Yankee camp, but before the men reached their refuge, another shell exploded in their midst, killing several. Agonized screams pierced the air, and the survivors yelled and cursed as they fled. Union soldiers advanced toward them in the dark. Their voices carried across the field, so the Alabamians could tell they were being pursued. Hiram and his comrades turned and fired upon their adversaries. The Yankees returned the volley. Fighting continued for several minutes until the Federals retired.

(Page 68)
As summer approached, David learned of events that ignited the region. Frank Gurley and his cavalrymen, who were being referred to as his “Seven Immortals,” became more active in their attempts to aggravate General Mitchel in Huntsville. At McDavid’s Mill, they captured four sutlers’ wagons and ninety-six bales of cotton that Northern buyers were preparing to ship north. They also made several attacks on the Union garrison at the railroad bridge over Flint River. On one occasion, they killed a Federal soldier and captured another. Annoyed with their constant harassment, the Union army burned the town of Whitesburg to the ground in retribution. Local businessman, “Uncle” Billy Ryan, distributed supplies to Gurley and his men, as well as to needy families in the area. Harper’s Weekly printed a story about General Mitchel’s success in capturing north Alabama down to the Tennessee River, which included Huntsville. The article, embellished with a beautiful painting of the town, enraged David when he saw it.

(Page 74)
On June 17, General Lee sent the 4th Alabama and Hood’s Texans to the Shenandoah Valley to support Stonewall Jackson, while Union General McDowell was ordered to defend Washington against Jackson’s advance. Hiram’s regiment marched 150 miles, and was allowed to rest for only one day during the journey. Eight days later, the men bivouacked near Ashland, twelve miles from Richmond. Circling around McClellan’s army, they were now behind it. The following morning, General Lee pursued the fleeing Federals.

(Page 74)
The Alabamians heard heavy fighting ahead, and knew they were headed for a hornets’ nest. They passed General Porter’s abandoned camp. Everything was still intact, including tents, officers’ tables, and chairs, appearing as though the Federals intended to return once the threat had passed. General Porter, it was learned, fell back to Gaines Farm, which was about a mile from Cold Harbor. Before the 4th reached the firing line, Captain Robbins of Company G requested the men to kneel. He then delivered a heartfelt prayer.

(Page 75)
Caught in the whirlwind, Hiram charged fearlessly. Men dropped around him like flies, the thud of bullets sinking into them before their bodies exploded with blood. The Alabamians kept running until they reached a ravine and the waiting line of Federals, oblivious to the death that surrounded them while bullets whistled and whizzed by. Colonel McLemore fell wounded, and was quickly replaced by Captain Scruggs.

(Page 75)
The Confederates jumped into the Union breastworks, stampeding like cattle. In response, the Federals broke and ran as the Alabamians thundered up the ascent to the second line of defense. The Yankees from the first line swept through the second, and all turned tail. The Rebels kept shrieking, cursing, and running in pursuit. They attacked the third line that waited at the top of the hill. The Union soldiers panicked and fell back, retreating at a run to avoid the charging Confederates, who fired a successful volley into the fleeing enemy. Before the Federals could remove their artillery pieces, the Rebels captured fourteen of them. As the Alabamians watched their enemies escape, their voices rose up in triumphant cheers, which spread through the ranks.

(Page 75)
It was discovered the following day that the 4th Alabama lost twenty-three, including Captain Armistead and Captain Price, and 109 were either wounded or missing. Jim Harrison of Company D received admiration for his ability to capture twenty-three men and an officer. In the excitement of battle, he had unintentionally jumped into a trench filled with Federals, so he shot one and took the rest prisoner. Among the Yankees captured by the Confederates was Colonel McLemore’s old regiment, the 8th U.S. Infantry, which he had resigned from at the onset of the war.

(Page 76)
The Alabamians spent the day tending to their dead and wounded, and repairing the bridge across the Chickahominy, which the Federals had destroyed upon their departure. Bud and Hiram volunteered for bridge repair, since they preferred to evade the morose task of burial duty.

(Page 76)
In the morning, it was discovered that the Federals had run off, leaving their casualties behind, as well as a few artillery pieces and some small arms. Wails from thousands of wounded men could be heard, but once the fog lifted, the horrible scene that played out before the Alabamians was nothing less than heartrending. They could see at least five thousand dead or wounded soldiers. A third of the victims lay still in death, but the rest were alive, crawling over the battlefield like maggots on a carcass. Only two men of the 4th Alabama were killed, but thirteen were wounded.

(Page 79)
Two days later, the Rebels continued their pursuit of the Federals. They reached the Rappahannock, and moved upriver under constant shelling from their adversaries. The 4th Alabama was ordered to the front of the advancing Confederates. They charged, driving the Yankees into the river. As a result, many who couldn’t swim drowned, while others were killed or captured.

(Page 80)
The effusion of blood raged on. Jackson’s right brigade pressed the Yankees, and managed to capture one of their three-inch rifles. At six o’clock, a large portion of the enemy’s artillery, as well as their infantry, started up the turnpike toward the Alabamians, who were ordered to charge. The Federals reacted by firing their artillery into the advancing Rebels. Members of Colonel Law’s brigade were blown to pieces, their appendages torn from their torsos, and their broken bodies hurled through the air. Blood splattered down like a rapid downpour, mixed with dirt and shrapnel. Several others were hit by flying metal, and screamed in agony as they writhed to the ground.

(Pages 80-81)
Quickening their pace, the men of the 4th Alabama ran hunched over, and reached the cover of a hill, where the belching cannons had no effect. Seeing that they were being overtaken, the Yankees fell back, but not before some members of the 4th managed to wrestle a sponge staff from one of the artillery gunners and take his howitzer. The Alabamians continued pressing the Federals until darkness prevented further pursuit.

(Page 81)
The Federals advanced a column of infantry out from the woods toward Jackson and his men, who lay in wait within a railroad cut. They retaliated by firing into them. The two opposing forces clashed in hand-to-hand combat until the Yankees finally retreated. Pope marched out one column after another, only to have each one repelled. Jackson’s men used all of their ammunition, so they had to fight off the advancing Union soldiers by hurling rocks. The 4th Alabama continued to observe until they were called upon, along with General Longstreet’s men, to support Jackson. They rushed to his rescue, and the Yankees were finally forced to retreat, leaving their dead and dying on the field. All the while, artillery from both sides continued firing canister and grapeshot. Billowing smoke hung over the infantrymen as opposing sides shot at each other. Like the previous day, the Confederates again drove their enemies, until nightfall hindered them.

(Page 81)
Later in the day, a soldier from Company A returned to camp, explaining that he had been captured by Sigel’s Dutch, who were really Germans, but in the Federals’ haste to depart, he was left behind. The Confederates were fed better rations than they had been given since leaving Richmond. Musicians in Hiram’s company, Foggarty, Halsey, and Hickey, celebrated the victory by playing Irish music with instruments they found abandoned on the battlefield by the Union army. That evening, Bud and several others returned to camp. Happy to see that his friend had recovered, Hiram greeted him enthusiastically, and the two exchanged stories of their exploits.

(Page 87)
McClellan attempted to chase after the Rebels, and some of his troops captured four Confederate cannons. On the morning of September 20, the Federals were driven back across the Potomac, where they remained. Apparently, McClellan was satisfied with himself enough to sit back on his laurels.

(Page 88)
The soldiers were eager to hear news about the war, and of battles that had taken place elsewhere. One such battle, an artillery fight at Little Bear Creek near Tuscumbia, Alabama, took place between Generals Roddey and Sweeny. After Roddey drove the Yankee invaders back to Corinth, Mississippi, he engaged the Federals at Barton Station, where he again drove them back.

(Page 97)
Some of the Rebels managed to converse with the enemy, even though it was strictly forbidden, and exchange their tobacco for much-desired coffee and sugar. After a while, though, a treaty was established, and the Southerners sent across a plank, with a mast made from a current Richmond newspaper. The Federals sent their “boat” to the Southern port, using a mast constructed from a Northern newspaper. Thus, the two sides stayed abreast of what the media was saying.

(Page 97)
On several occasions, Hiram heard music float across the river. The Yankee bands played new songs he had never heard before. One sounded like “John Brown’s Body,” but the words had been changed. This, he learned, was the Union army’s new anthem, “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” He didn’t appreciate the lyrics, since they equated the Confederates to devils, but listened with interest, nonetheless. Another Yankee song they played repetitively was called the “Battle Cry of Freedom.” He liked that one better, but it still didn’t make his spirit soar like “Dixie” did. The Federals played “The Star-Spangled Banner” and “Hail Columbia,” songs the Southerners once held dear, and waited for Confederate bands to reply, but no reprisal came. As if reading Hiram’s mind, the Yankees rambunctiously played “Dixie’s Land.” Men on both sides of the river burst into cheers, which fell away to mutual laughter.

(Page 98)
At ten o’clock, the Yankees started to bombard the town, each of their 367 guns firing fifty rounds. From their position, Hiram and his comrades could see Fredericksburg set ablaze. Hysterical citizens ran out into the streets, scattering into the nearby woods. Although the weather was mild for December, Hiram knew that they would likely freeze come nightfall. The thought of those destitute women and children wrenched his heart. After some time, the Confederates’ efforts to repel the Yankees proved futile. The Federals started over the river in boats and soon began filing across their pontoon bridges. By nightfall, they had taken the town. General Lee arranged his troops, comprised of the brigades of Jackson, Longstreet, A. P. Hill, and McLaws, as well as the divisions led by Taliaferro, D. H. Hill, and Early. Supported by General J. E. B. Stuart’s cavalry and John Pelham’s artillery, the men became entrenched at Marye’s Hill. Their lines stretched seven miles, with eleven thousand men per mile, or six Confederate soldiers per yard. Over three hundred cannons were poised and ready to fire. The 4th was put into position behind an embankment that afforded them sufficient protection.

(Page 98)
At sunup, the North Alabamians awoke to hear Federal bands playing, and the Union infantrymen scuffling about while they moved, but he couldn’t see anything, due to heavy fog. The 4th marched back to their previous position, where they discovered brisk skirmishing and artillery fire taking place. Burnside had begun harassing the Confederates but was unable to accomplish anything.

(Page 98)
The Federals marched at a double quick, loudly yelling, “Hi! Hi! Hi!” and “Huzzah!” as they advanced, flattening fences and fields in their wake.

(Page 99)
With his own comrades entrenched on either side of him, Hiram and the North Alabamians observed the fighting. Burnside reignited his attack in earnest at two o’clock by shelling another regiment of Rebels, who stood their ground in a sunken road behind a stone wall. One advance after another tried in vain to break the Confederate stance, but all were unable to penetrate the line. The Yankees marched up the hill until there were so many of their dead clogging the battlefield that the advancing Federals were unable to climb over them. The frozen ground in the sunken road gave way to mud and slush beneath the feet of hundreds of thrashing combatants. Some slipped and fell on grass made slick with the blood of their fellow soldiers. At last, twilight engulfed the battlefield, forcing the Yankees to fall back.

(Page 100)
“Surrender now, seceshes!” one of the Federals commanded, using a slang term for secessionists.

(Page 101)
The next day, December 15, they waited for renewed fighting, but nothing happened until late afternoon, when they received slight shelling. The Federals spent a good portion of the day burying their many dead, until nightfall hindered their progress.

(Page 101)

The men awoke to find it was raining, as it usually did after a battle. They discovered that Burnside’s Federals had crossed the river overnight, demoralized into retreating to Washington. A wave of cheers rushed over the Rebel ranks. While the rain dissipated to drizzle, Bud, who was still in a daze, followed some of his comrades out onto the battlefield, which was covered with dead Yankee soldiers. It was obvious from what they saw that the Union army had suffered almost complete annihilation. Some of the Federals died trying to use their comrades’ bodies as shields. What it must have been like to lie in wait while bullets thudded into the bodies of their friends, Bud could only speculate. Besides corpses dressed in blue, some wore Zouave uniforms, while others adorned their trappings with Kelly green. Blue Hugh said they were with the Irish Brigade, because he had heard that they wore green boxwood sprigs in their caps to display their heritage. The barefoot Confederates immediately set to work, relieving the rigid bodies of their footwear and clothing, as well as their haversacks’ contents. Bud replaced his worn-out brogans, which had developed holes in their soles long ago.
Blue Hugh found a young, handsome Yankee boy, lying dead amongst the others, and motioned Bud over. Inside his knapsack, they discovered chocolate and numerous love letters, which Blue Hugh began to read mockingly over the body.

(Page 102)
Lee nodded in response without displaying an ounce of emotion. He informed the men that those who could go home were granted “furloughs of indulgence,” since the winter campaign had come to a close. Bud knew what was required of him, although it was the last thing on earth he wanted to do. Melodic strains from a Federal band wafted across the river, but “Home Sweet Home” only deepened his sorrow.

(Page 106)

A Federal band, which, eve and morn,
Played measures brave and nimble,
Had just struck up, with flute and horn
And lively clash of cymbal.

Search result for 'Federal' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 3: Chapter Three
"...Although the situation seemed to be worsening, strangely enough, visitors from Huntsville steadily arrived to see their boys, bringing gifts and letters. Citizens from home temporarily took their own places in the ranks as privates, readying for the fight, but the Yankees failed to appear, and rumors of the Federals’ impending advances proved to be false. ..."
"...The Fourth of July was observed with a speech by President Lincoln, whose plea to Congress led to the authorized call for five hundred thousand Federal volunteers. By making such a request, Lincoln apparently had made a total declaration of war, and the Confederates took it as such. Two days later, Private Humphreys was discharged. He returned to Alabama to raise a brigade, electing himself as colonel. ..."
107.
"... The men rushed over the fence and advanced at a double quick to the top of the hill. Colonel Jones ordered them to lie down just below the crest, to fire, load, and fire again. The Federals became entrenched only about one hundred yards from where Hiram and his comrades were positioned. ..."
"...General Bee ordered his men to retreat to a nearby hill. The Rebels fell behind it, and fortified the hill. Surprisingly, the field began to grow quiet, except for the frantic wails of injured soldiers. To the Alabamians’ relief, the Federals were retreating. With one hand, Hiram withdrew his pocket watch, and wiped sweat from his brow with the other. Clicking the timepiece open, he saw that it was nearly five o’clock. The battle had gone on for seven hours. ..."
"...the day, it was learned that General Bee had died from wounds he received. The white clapboard house at the center of the battle belonged to an invalid old woman by the name of Judith Carter Henry. Unable to leave her bed, she had been riddled with bullets. The Federals were commanded by Brigadier General Irvin McDowell. Generals Johnston and Beauregard of the Confederacy had proven themselves a worthy foe, and apparently had defeated the Union soldiers. Hiram and his comrades hoped that, by showing their mettle, they would bring a rapid end to the conflict, thus winning their ..."
"...B. Stuart, Confederate cavalry commander, had hurled his cavaliers into the New York Zouaves, and as the Yankees retreated, all hell broke loose. Civilians from Washington City had driven over to witness the battle, bringing along their ladies, complete with picnic lunches, parasols, and fine carriages. However, when the Federals “skedaddled,” they almost killed the Washington elite. An artillery shell worsened the situation when it hit a wagon, clogging the road that had been their escape route. Congressman Healy was captured by the Confederates and taken prisoner. The Rebels were calling it the “Bull Run Races.” ..."

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Chapter 5: Chapter Five
3.
"... at a time.” The North instigated the Revenue Act of 1861, which placed a Federal income tax on all its citizens in order to pay for the increasing war debt. It also established a 3 percent tax on annual incomes exceeding $800, which was far more than what most wage-earners made. By ..."
177.
"... a young’un.” The men somberly agreed. “I learned yesterday that the Federal government is printin’ off legal tender notes,” Mr. Garrison said to no one in particular. “Can you imagine usin’ paper money? Wonder how long that will last.” “Not long, I don’t reckon,” ..."

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Chapter 6: Chapter Six
"...A few days later, on Thursday, April 10, Jake accompanied David to the mercantile, where they received terrible news. The Yankees had won the battle at Shiloh, forcing the defeated Confederates to retreat south. Rumor had it that the Federals were giving chase by also heading in their direction. The boys rode home to inform their parents, and all braced themselves for the worst, hiding valuables and preparing extra food, just in case they had to escape from invading Yankee soldiers. ..."
"...We were soon isolated, because the telegraph lines were cut. There were about a hundred and fifty wounded men on one train who had been at the battle at Shiloh, and the Yankees took them all prisoner. Can you imagine? Those poor boys already sufferin’, and along come the Federals to keep them from their medicines.” ..."
"...what the Confederacy had been founded on. Newspapers reported that Fort Pulaski, located at the mouth of the Savannah River, had fallen, and Union forces captured it by using rifled cannon. They also printed that, on April 12, what was being called the “Great Locomotive Chase” took place. Several Federal volunteers had attempted to steal the Confederate locomotive General, but were discovered as they headed north from Big Shanty, Georgia. The Confederate crew of the Texas chased the General with their train in reverse, and finally captured it north of Ringgold. The story made great fodder for adventure-seeking readers. ..."
"...The situation was worsening in Huntsville, as Union soldiers went on a rampage. Their commander, Ormsby Mitchel, turned a blind eye to his soldiers’ pilfering. Federal gunboats patrolled up and down the Tennessee River, shelling towns and settlements along the banks. The Yankees burned, plundered, and foraged from the poor displaced souls, and raiding parties became more frequent. When David learned of the abomination, he considered joining up with a local group of Rebels who ..."
163.
"... a small cloud of dust. “It is him!” Jake said in amazement. A few of the Federals heard his voice. They turned to look, but David and Jake quickly backed into the shadows to avoid being detected. The Union soldiers filed past. “I told you!” David whispered. The company marched off down ..."

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Chapter 7: Chapter Seven
"...cursed as they fled. Union soldiers advanced toward them in the dark. Their voices carried across the field, so the Alabamians could tell they were being pursued. Hiram and his comrades turned and fired upon their adversaries. The Yankees returned the volley. Fighting continued for several minutes until the Federals retired. ..."
"...to aggravate General Mitchel in Huntsville. At McDavid’s Mill, they captured four sutlers’ wagons and ninety-six bales of cotton that Northern buyers were preparing to ship north. They also made several attacks on the Union garrison at the railroad bridge over Flint River. On one occasion, they killed a Federal soldier and captured another. Annoyed with their constant harassment, the Union army burned the town of Whitesburg to the ground in retribution. Local businessman, “Uncle” Billy Ryan, distributed supplies to Gurley and his men, as well as to needy families in the area. Harper’s Weekly printed a story about ..."

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Chapter 8: Chapter Eight
"...against Jackson’s advance. Hiram’s regiment marched 150 miles, and was allowed to rest for only one day during the journey. Eight days later, the men bivouacked near Ashland, twelve miles from Richmond. Circling around McClellan’s army, they were now behind it. The following morning, General Lee pursued the fleeing Federals. ..."
"...The Alabamians heard heavy fighting ahead, and knew they were headed for a hornets’ nest. They passed General Porter’s abandoned camp. Everything was still intact, including tents, officers’ tables, and chairs, appearing as though the Federals intended to return once the threat had passed. General Porter, it was learned, fell back to Gaines Farm, which was about a mile from Cold Harbor. Before the 4th reached the firing line, Captain Robbins of Company G requested the men to kneel. He then delivered a heartfelt prayer. ..."
"...Caught in the whirlwind, Hiram charged fearlessly. Men dropped around him like flies, the thud of bullets sinking into them before their bodies exploded with blood. The Alabamians kept running until they reached a ravine and the waiting line of Federals, oblivious to the death that surrounded them while bullets whistled and whizzed by. Colonel McLemore fell wounded, and was quickly replaced by Captain Scruggs. ..."
"...The Confederates jumped into the Union breastworks, stampeding like cattle. In response, the Federals broke and ran as the Alabamians thundered up the ascent to the second line of defense. The Yankees from the first line swept through the second, and all turned tail. The Rebels kept shrieking, cursing, and running in pursuit. They attacked the third line that waited at the top ..."
"...the 4th Alabama lost twenty-three, including Captain Armistead and Captain Price, and 109 were either wounded or missing. Jim Harrison of Company D received admiration for his ability to capture twenty-three men and an officer. In the excitement of battle, he had unintentionally jumped into a trench filled with Federals, so he shot one and took the rest prisoner. Among the Yankees captured by the Confederates was Colonel McLemore’s old regiment, the 8th U.S. Infantry, which he had resigned from at the onset of the war. ..."
15.
"... the war. The Alabamians spent the day tending to their dead and wounded, and repairing the bridge across the Chickahominy, which the Federals had destroyed upon their departure. Bud and Hiram volunteered for bridge repair, since they preferred to evade the morose task of burial duty. On June ..."
"...In the morning, it was discovered that the Federals had run off, leaving their casualties behind, as well as a few artillery pieces and some small arms. Wails from thousands of wounded men could be heard, but once the fog lifted, the horrible scene that played out before the Alabamians was nothing less than heartrending. They could see ..."
"...Two days later, the Rebels continued their pursuit of the Federals. They reached the Rappahannock, and moved upriver under constant shelling from their adversaries. The 4th Alabama was ordered to the front of the advancing Confederates. They charged, driving the Yankees into the river. As a result, many who couldn’t swim drowned, while others were killed or captured. ..."
"...The effusion of blood raged on. Jackson’s right brigade pressed the Yankees, and managed to capture one of their three-inch rifles. At six o’clock, a large portion of the enemy’s artillery, as well as their infantry, started up the turnpike toward the Alabamians, who were ordered to charge. The Federals reacted by firing their artillery into the advancing Rebels. Members of Colonel Law’s brigade were blown to pieces, their appendages torn from their torsos, and their broken bodies hurled through the air. Blood splattered down like a rapid downpour, mixed with dirt and shrapnel. Several others were hit by ..."
"...of a hill, where the belching cannons had no effect. Seeing that they were being overtaken, the Yankees fell back, but not before some members of the 4th managed to wrestle a sponge staff from one of the artillery gunners and take his howitzer. The Alabamians continued pressing the Federals until darkness prevented further pursuit. ..."
"...The Federals advanced a column of infantry out from the woods toward Jackson and his men, who lay in wait within a railroad cut. They retaliated by firing into them. The two opposing forces clashed in hand-to-hand combat until the Yankees finally retreated. Pope marched out one column after another, only ..."
"...Later in the day, a soldier from Company A returned to camp, explaining that he had been captured by Sigel’s Dutch, who were really Germans, but in the Federals’ haste to depart, he was left behind. The Confederates were fed better rations than they had been given since leaving Richmond. Musicians in Hiram’s company, Foggarty, Halsey, and Hickey, celebrated the victory by playing Irish music with instruments they found abandoned on the battlefield by the Union army. That ..."

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Chapter 9: Chapter Nine
80.
"... McClellan attempted to chase after the Rebels, and some of his troops captured four Confederate cannons. On the morning of September 20, the Federals were driven back across the Potomac, where they remained. Apparently, McClellan was satisfied with himself enough to sit back on his laurels. ..."
"...were eager to hear news about the war, and of battles that had taken place elsewhere. One such battle, an artillery fight at Little Bear Creek near Tuscumbia, Alabama, took place between Generals Roddey and Sweeny. After Roddey drove the Yankee invaders back to Corinth, Mississippi, he engaged the Federals at Barton Station, where he again drove them back. ..."

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Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
"...of the Rebels managed to converse with the enemy, even though it was strictly forbidden, and exchange their tobacco for much-desired coffee and sugar. After a while, though, a treaty was established, and the Southerners sent across a plank, with a mast made from a current Richmond newspaper. The Federals sent their “boat” to the Southern port, using a mast constructed from a Northern newspaper. Thus, the two sides stayed abreast of what the media was saying. ..."
"...the Republic.” He didn’t appreciate the lyrics, since they equated the Confederates to devils, but listened with interest, nonetheless. Another Yankee song they played repetitively was called the “Battle Cry of Freedom.” He liked that one better, but it still didn’t make his spirit soar like “Dixie” did. The Federals played “The Star-Spangled Banner” and “Hail Columbia,” songs the Southerners once held dear, and waited for Confederate bands to reply, but no reprisal came. As if reading Hiram’s mind, the Yankees rambunctiously played “Dixie’s Land.” Men on both sides of the river burst into cheers, which fell away to ..."
"...out into the streets, scattering into the nearby woods. Although the weather was mild for December, Hiram knew that they would likely freeze come nightfall. The thought of those destitute women and children wrenched his heart. After some time, the Confederates’ efforts to repel the Yankees proved futile. The Federals started over the river in boats and soon began filing across their pontoon bridges. By nightfall, they had taken the town. General Lee arranged his troops, comprised of the brigades of Jackson, Longstreet, A. P. Hill, and McLaws, as well as the divisions led by Taliaferro, D. H. Hill, ..."
"...At sunup, the North Alabamians awoke to hear Federal bands playing, and the Union infantrymen scuffling about while they moved, but he couldn’t see anything, due to heavy fog. The 4th marched back to their previous position, where they discovered brisk skirmishing and artillery fire taking place. Burnside had begun harassing the Confederates but was unable to accomplish ..."
123.
"... sparkling with silver from sunlight glinting off their bayonets. The Federals marched at a double quick, loudly yelling, “Hi! Hi! Hi!” and “Huzzah!” as they advanced, flattening fences and fields in their wake. They came up from the town as though on parade, and appeared to be ..."
"...ground in a sunken road behind a stone wall. One advance after another tried in vain to break the Confederate stance, but all were unable to penetrate the line. The Yankees marched up the hill until there were so many of their dead clogging the battlefield that the advancing Federals were unable to climb over them. The frozen ground in the sunken road gave way to mud and slush beneath the feet of hundreds of thrashing combatants. Some slipped and fell on grass made slick with the blood of their fellow soldiers. At last, twilight engulfed the battlefield, forcing ..."
153.
"... writhing in agony. Another Yankee fired at Bud, who flinched as the bullet whizzed by his cheek. “Surrender now, seceshes!” one of the Federals commanded, using a slang term for secessionists. Before Bud could react, hot fire exploded behind him, and the Yankees fell back into the woods. He ..."
175.
"... his own forgiveness. The next day, December 15, they waited for renewed fighting, but nothing happened until late afternoon, when they received slight shelling. The Federals spent a good portion of the day burying their many dead, until nightfall hindered their progress. That evening, Bud ..."
"...The men awoke to find it was raining, as it usually did after a battle. They discovered that Burnside’s Federals had crossed the river overnight, demoralized into retreating to Washington. A wave of cheers rushed over the Rebel ranks. While the rain dissipated to drizzle, Bud, who was still in a daze, followed some of his comrades out onto the battlefield, which was covered with dead Yankee soldiers. It ..."
"...of emotion. He informed the men that those who could go home were granted “furloughs of indulgence,” since the winter campaign had come to a close. Bud knew what was required of him, although it was the last thing on earth he wanted to do. Melodic strains from a Federal band wafted across the river, but “Home Sweet Home” only deepened his sorrow. ..."

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"The history is intertwined ingeniously into the plot. It is well plotted and the narrative moves along at nice clip...."

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