A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'infantry' mean?

Find out what infantry means. Infantry is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

infantry

A division of the military that traveled and fought on foot. In A Beautiful Glittering Lie, infantry is referred to as such:

(Page 4)
R.T. Cole (posthumously)
Mr. Cole served as an adjutant in the 4th Regiment, Alabama Volunteer Infantry. Because he had the foresight and fortitude to record his thoughts and actions in his diary, the events in this novel are very accurate. Without his documentation, many of the specifics detailing what the 4th Alabama went through would be lost to history.

(Page 20)
“That was a mighty nice ceremony,” Bud commented, to which his father agreed. “Two days ago, I heard that the Marion Light Infantry received a banner made of blue silk, which came from a young lady’s weddin’ dress.”

(Page 28)
Almost immediately, voting began to determine who would lead what was now known as the 4th Alabama Infantry Regiment, consisting of fourteen hundred men and ten companies: the Governor’s Guards and the Magnolia Cadets from Dallas County, the Tuskegee Zouaves from Macon County, the Canebrake Rifles of Perry and Marengo Counties, the Conecuh Guards from Conecuh County, the Marion Light Infantry of Perry County, the Lauderdale Guards of Lauderdale County, the Huntsville Guards and North Alabamians from Madison County, and the Larkinsville Guards of Jackson County. The regiment included men from all walks of life, from planters and clergymen to lawyers and physicians.

(Page 31)
Within a few weeks, the infantrymen became disenchanted with their new colonel, for he rigorously sent them through routine drills, and relentlessly imposed discipline that the North Alabamians found repetitious and boring. Anxious to fight the Yankees, they grew resentful of the monotony forced upon them, and they were concerned about the colonel’s lack of fighting experience while he had served in the Mexican War. The soldiers’ disgruntlement led to their passing a petition around camp that called for Jones to resign.

(Page 31)
Word reached the troops that on May 24, a New York infantry regiment led by Colonel Elmer Ellsworth arrived in Alexandria. A large Southern flag had been displayed from the Marshall House Hotel, which was visible from Washington. The colonel attempted to remove it himself, but was shot in the chest with a double-barrel shotgun by the proprietor of the hotel, James W. Jackson, who in return was shot and bayoneted to death. Few members of the 4th Alabama expressed remorse for the loss of Ellsworth, especially since he had been a close friend of President Lincoln. In their opinion, it was only a shame that Jackson had been murdered for defending his rights.

(Page 37)

“Our brave men fell in great numbers, but they died as the brave love to die—with faces to the foe, fighting in the holy cause of liberty.”
—Captain Thomas Goldsby, 4th Alabama Infantry Regiment

(Page 43)
The spectators stood along the curbside, watching as a detachment of forty soldiers from each of the eleven companies training at Camp Jones marched by in full uniform, complete with glistening bayonets and polished boots. Next came the glass hearse, decorated with white plumes and crepe, drawn by four white horses draped in black. The coffin lay inside, swathed with black cloth. On top of it was displayed a Confederate flag, the deceased’s sword, and wreaths of fresh flowers and evergreens. Pallbearers including both citizens and soldiers walked on either side of the hearse while it made its way down the street. Behind it, an infantryman rode Old Battalion, who had come home with his master. Members of the 4th Alabama marched behind to a requiem that the band played in accompaniment, followed by the mayor and Huntsville aldermen. Next were the colonel’s relatives, who rode in a black carriage, and various citizens in vehicles and on foot, trailing behind in a long succession.

(Page 43)
On October 7, state leaders announced that Alabama had supplied twenty-seven thousand troops to the Confederacy thus far. This included sixty infantry regiments, thirteen cavalry regiments, six battalions, and twenty batteries. The war was ramping up, that much was certain.

(Page 56)
Out of sheer boredom, some infantrymen played practical jokes on their comrades. One such fellow, Enoch Campbell, whom Bud and Hiram met upon their arrival into the army, was appointed barber. For his own entertainment, Enoch frequently shaved half of his patrons’ faces before walking off to leave the other half unshaven. A few of the younger, more irresponsible men planted gunpowder near their messmates’ bedrolls, finding great fun in exploding it while their friends lay sleeping, until they were severely reprimanded by their superiors. Some unruly soldiers were disciplined for their disruptive behavior by spending time in the “bullpen,” or guardhouse, and given just bread and water to sustain on. Other offenders were paraded around camp to the tunes of “Yankee Doodle” and “Rough’s March,” wearing only barrels, with signs around their necks that read “liar” and “thief.” Several were ordered to carry out extra sentry duty, or were refused their pay, although the Confederacy had yet to compensate any of its defenders.

(Page 65)
“There has been a rumor floatin’ around that two hundred and fifty of our boys ambushed a Yankee detachment of infantry at Paint Rock Bridge,” said Mr. Skidmore. “But we all think General Mitchel invented that story to make his own men look good.”

(Page 67)
On the evening of May 30, Hiram’s regiment was ordered to march a few miles east of Richmond, where they bivouacked in a grove of oak trees. The men of Company G, the Marion Light Infantry, stacked their guns against one of the oaks, and went to sleep beneath it. During the night, a terrible electrical storm blew in. A bolt of lightning hit the tree, destroyed the guns, killed one soldier, and injured forty-six others. The 4th Alabama expressed sadness for losing their comrades before they were ordered to march. Hiram wondered if such a great loss was a terrible indication of what was to come, but he kept his daunting thoughts to himself.

(Page 74)
“Our home was the regiment, and the farther we got from our native state the more we became attached to it.”
—Private William Watson, 3rd Louisiana Infantry

(Page 75)
It was discovered the following day that the 4th Alabama lost twenty-three, including Captain Armistead and Captain Price, and 109 were either wounded or missing. Jim Harrison of Company D received admiration for his ability to capture twenty-three men and an officer. In the excitement of battle, he had unintentionally jumped into a trench filled with Federals, so he shot one and took the rest prisoner. Among the Yankees captured by the Confederates was Colonel McLemore’s old regiment, the 8th U.S. Infantry, which he had resigned from at the onset of the war.

(Page 76)
Union sympathizers arrived in Decatur and made it their mission to report Rebels who were hiding in the hills. Union Colonel Abel Streight decided to pursue the offenders, so he took a regiment of infantry and one company of cavalry into the mountains to hunt them down. The cavalry was attacked by Confederate scouts, so they returned to Decatur, but the infantry was successful in capturing the fugitives, and forced them to enlist with the 1st Alabama Cavalry. On July 10, they were inducted into the Union Army.

(Page 80)
The effusion of blood raged on. Jackson’s right brigade pressed the Yankees, and managed to capture one of their three-inch rifles. At six o’clock, a large portion of the enemy’s artillery, as well as their infantry, started up the turnpike toward the Alabamians, who were ordered to charge. The Federals reacted by firing their artillery into the advancing Rebels. Members of Colonel Law’s brigade were blown to pieces, their appendages torn from their torsos, and their broken bodies hurled through the air. Blood splattered down like a rapid downpour, mixed with dirt and shrapnel. Several others were hit by flying metal, and screamed in agony as they writhed to the ground.

(Page 80)
Colonel Law ordered his men to halt. He then positioned them across the pike, but at 1:00 a.m., General Hood, Law’s superior, ordered them to abandon their position, along with the captured howitzer, and return to their original position. Through the course of the night, they obtained little sleep, because the loud banging of guns, roar of cannons, and tramp of infantrymen prevented it. By the time the sun rose on the morning of Saturday, August 30, all of the Rebel corps had reached the field, extending from Groveton across the pike to Bull Run below the Stone Bridge.

(Page 80)
The Federals advanced a column of infantry out from the woods toward Jackson and his men, who lay in wait within a railroad cut. They retaliated by firing into them. The two opposing forces clashed in hand-to-hand combat until the Yankees finally retreated. Pope marched out one column after another, only to have each one repelled. Jackson’s men used all of their ammunition, so they had to fight off the advancing Union soldiers by hurling rocks. The 4th Alabama continued to observe until they were called upon, along with General Longstreet’s men, to support Jackson. They rushed to his rescue, and the Yankees were finally forced to retreat, leaving their dead and dying on the field. All the while, artillery from both sides continued firing canister and grapeshot. Billowing smoke hung over the infantrymen as opposing sides shot at each other. Like the previous day, the Confederates again drove their enemies, until nightfall hindered them.

(Page 98)
At sunup, the North Alabamians awoke to hear Federal bands playing, and the Union infantrymen scuffling about while they moved, but he couldn’t see anything, due to heavy fog. The 4th marched back to their previous position, where they discovered brisk skirmishing and artillery fire taking place. Burnside had begun harassing the Confederates but was unable to accomplish anything.

(Page 104)
“The Fourth Alabama Infantry, but that ain’t none of your concern.” Bud stifled his anger. “Now if you fellers would kindly allow me to pass, I’ll be on my way, and we can all go about our business like none of this happened. I have an urgent errand to ‘tend to.”

Search result for 'infantry' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 2: Chapter Two
38.
"... toward what the men were saying. “That was a mighty nice ceremony,” Bud commented, to which his father agreed. “Two days ago, I heard that the Marion Light infantry received a banner made of blue silk, which came from a young lady’s weddin’ dress.” “Ours is jist as fine,” said ..."

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Chapter 3: Chapter Three
"...infantrymmediately, voting began to determine who would lead what was now known as the 4th Alabama infantry Regiment, consisting of fourteen hundred men and ten companies: the Governor’s Guards and the Magnolia Cadets from Dallas County, the Tuskegee Zouaves from Macon County, the Canebrake Rifles of Perry and Marengo Counties, ..."
"...Within a few weeks, the infantrymen became disenchanted with their new colonel, for he rigorously sent them through routine drills, and relentlessly imposed discipline that the North Alabamians found repetitious and boring. Anxious to fight the Yankees, they grew resentful of the monotony forced upon them, and they were concerned about the colonel’s lack of ..."
"...Word reached the troops that on May 24, a New York infantry regiment led by Colonel Elmer Ellsworth arrived in Alexandria. A large Southern flag had been displayed from the Marshall House Hotel, which was visible from Washington. The colonel attempted to remove it himself, but was shot in the chest with a double-barrel shotgun by the proprietor of the hotel, ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 4: Chapter Four
"...lay inside, swathed with black cloth. On top of it was displayed a Confederate flag, the deceased’s sword, and wreaths of fresh flowers and evergreens. Pallbearers including both citizens and soldiers walked on either side of the hearse while it made its way down the street. Behind it, an infantryman rode Old Battalion, who had come home with his master. Members of the 4th Alabama marched behind to a requiem that the band played in accompaniment, followed by the mayor and Huntsville aldermen. Next were the colonel’s relatives, who rode in a black carriage, and various citizens in vehicles ..."
155.
"... On October 7, state leaders announced that Alabama had supplied twenty-seven thousand troops to the Confederacy thus far. This included sixty infantry regiments, thirteen cavalry regiments, six battalions, and twenty batteries. The war was ramping up, that much was certain. Caroline ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 6: Chapter Six
"...Out of sheer boredom, some infantrymen played practical jokes on their comrades. One such fellow, Enoch Campbell, whom Bud and Hiram met upon their arrival into the army, was appointed barber. For his own entertainment, Enoch frequently shaved half of his patrons’ faces before walking off to leave the other half unshaven. A few of ..."

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Chapter 7: Chapter Seven
1.
"... mercantile store. “There has been a rumor floatin’ around that two hundred and fifty of our boys ambushed a Yankee detachment of infantry at Paint Rock Bridge,” said Mr. Skidmore. “But we all think General Mitchel invented that story to make his own men look good.” David thought of ..."
"...infantryvening of May 30, Hiram’s regiment was ordered to march a few miles east of Richmond, where they bivouacked in a grove of oak trees. The men of Company G, the Marion Light infantry, stacked their guns against one of the oaks, and went to sleep beneath it. During the ..."

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Chapter 8: Chapter Eight
"...infantryiscovered the following day that the 4th Alabama lost twenty-three, including Captain Armistead and Captain Price, and 109 were either wounded or missing. Jim Harrison of Company D received admiration for his ability to capture twenty-three men and an officer. In the excitement of battle, he had unintentionally jumped into ..."
"...Union sympathizers arrived in Decatur and made it their mission to report Rebels who were hiding in the hills. Union Colonel Abel Streight decided to pursue the offenders, so he took a regiment of infantry and one company of cavalry into the mountains to hunt them down. The cavalry was attacked by Confederate scouts, so they returned to Decatur, but the infantry was successful in capturing the fugitives, and forced them to enlist with the 1st Alabama Cavalry. On July 10, they were inducted ..."
"...The effusion of blood raged on. Jackson’s right brigade pressed the Yankees, and managed to capture one of their three-inch rifles. At six o’clock, a large portion of the enemy’s artillery, as well as their infantry, started up the turnpike toward the Alabamians, who were ordered to charge. The Federals reacted by firing their artillery into the advancing Rebels. Members of Colonel Law’s brigade were blown to pieces, their appendages torn from their torsos, and their broken bodies hurled through the air. Blood splattered down ..."
"...the pike, but at 1:00 a.m., General Hood, Law’s superior, ordered them to abandon their position, along with the captured howitzer, and return to their original position. Through the course of the night, they obtained little sleep, because the loud banging of guns, roar of cannons, and tramp of infantrymen prevented it. By the time the sun rose on the morning of Saturday, August 30, all of the Rebel corps had reached the field, extending from Groveton across the pike to Bull Run below the Stone Bridge. ..."
"...The Federals advanced a column of infantry out from the woods toward Jackson and his men, who lay in wait within a railroad cut. They retaliated by firing into them. The two opposing forces clashed in hand-to-hand combat until the Yankees finally retreated. Pope marched out one column after another, only to have each one repelled. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
"...At sunup, the North Alabamians awoke to hear Federal bands playing, and the Union infantrymen scuffling about while they moved, but he couldn’t see anything, due to heavy fog. The 4th marched back to their previous position, where they discovered brisk skirmishing and artillery fire taking place. Burnside had begun harassing the Confederates but was unable to accomplish anything. ..."
233.
"... beard. “The Fourth Alabama infantry, but that ain’t none of your concern.” Bud stifled his anger. “Now if you fellers would kindly allow me to pass, I’ll be on my way, and we can all go about our business like none of this happened. I have an urgent errand to ‘tend to.” “The ..."

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"The history is intertwined ingeniously into the plot. It is well plotted and the narrative moves along at nice clip...."

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