A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'North' mean?

Find out what North means. North is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

North

Also called the United States or the Union, the North was the part of the country that remained loyal to the Federal government during the Civil War. Northern states included Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Main, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. West Virginia became a Northern state in 1863. California and Oregon were also considered to be Northern states, but they had little involvement during the war. In my novel, A Beautiful Glittering Lie, the North is referred to as such:

(Page 8)
“There can be but little rivalry between ours and any manufacturin’ or navigatin’ community, such as the Northeastern States of the American Union,” said the president-elect. “It must follow, therefore, that mutual interest would invite goodwill and kind offices. If, however, passion or the lust of dominion should cloud the judgment or inflame the ambition of those states, we must prepare to meet the emergency and maintain, by the final arbitrament of the sword, the position which we have assumed among the nations of the earth …”

(Page 8)
“I reckon he’s referrin’ to the fact that Northern tyranny has suppressed us here in the South,” Jenny’s husband, Nate, said softly, giving an affirmative nod. “And if the Yankees don’t allow us to leave peaceably, we’ll take up arms if need be.”

(Page 9)
Jefferson Davis rambled on. “Should reason guide the action of the government from which we have separated, a policy so detrimental to the civilized world, the Northern states included, could not be dictated by even the strongest desire to inflict injury upon us; but otherwise a terrible responsibility will rest upon it, and the sufferin’ of millions will bear testimony to the folly and wickedness of our aggressors. In the meantime there will remain to us, besides the ordinary means before suggested, the well-known resources for retaliation upon the commerce of an enemy …”

(Page 11)
“The North,” he continued, “will find that while we are their best customers in peace, we will become their worst enemies in war.”

(Page 11)
“I heard about that,” responded Mr. Kimball. “They were fixin’ to call it the Free State of Nickajack, so’s it would be a neutral state betwixt the North and South.”

(Page 15)
“It’s a guitar. They’re mighty popular up North. I started makin’ it for you before all this talk of war broke out.” He withdrew a small hand-drawn booklet from his vest pocket. “This shows how to play chords on it, kinda like a pianee.” Giving it to his son, who began studying it intently, he added, “I know you wanted a banjo, but I’m hopin’ this will suffice.”

(Page 36)
As other reports came in, it was estimated that the 4th Alabama lost nearly two hundred men. Those who survived could feel nothing but animosity toward their foe, for the northerners were indeed their enemies, out to kill them all … but not if the Rebels killed them first.

(Page 39)
Although he knew he was going against his mother’s wishes, David went out of his way to learn what was happening in Virginia, and he read every detail he could find about the battle. He found out that on July 27, General McClellan was appointed to Commander of the Department of the Potomac, replacing General McDowell, who had failed at the battle, which the Northerners were calling Bull Run and the Rebels were referring to as Manassas. A few days later, on August 6, the Confiscation Act was passed, which permitted the seizure of all property that was being used for insurrection, including slaves. It stripped the slave owners of their property rights, but didn’t actually free the slaves, so they were considered property of the U.S. government.

(Page 46)
The North instigated the Revenue Act of 1861, which placed a federal income tax on all its citizens in order to pay for the increasing war debt. It also established a 3 percent tax on annual incomes exceeding $800, which was far more than what most wage-earners made.

(Page 48)
“Crittenden, from Kentucky. My kinfolk live up that way, and told me all about it.” He paused, but hearing no objection, continued. “The good senator tried his darnedest to make those humbugs up in Washin’ton come to their senses.” Seeing David look at him questioningly, he elaborated. “He proposed a bill that would entitle each new state to vote if it wanted slavery, and for the plantation owners to be compensated for their slaves, should their niggers be set free. But ole ‘Rail Splitter’ Lincoln and his cronies in Congress shot down his bill. Now the poor senator has one son fightin’ for the North, and the other one fightin’ for the South.”

(Page 53)
School resumed, but classes were intermittent, since the weather dictated participation and attendance. Josie brought home a new grammar book, which focused on the war effort and Confederate superiority over the Northern invaders. The new readers were also chock-full of anti-Yankee sentiment. David found them amusing, as did his little sister, although the propaganda they exuded was somewhat disturbing, in that they promoted the murder of Yankees.

(Page 54)
“My younger cousin, Henry, is first lieutenant of Company H, which has been organized right here in Morgan County,” Joseph Ryan proclaimed. “Soon as they git to Tennessee, they’ll whip ole U. S., and send him back up North where he belongs!”

(Page 56)

May those Northern fanatics who abuse their Southern neighbors,
Approach near enough to feel the point of our sabers;
May they come near enough to hear the click of a trigger,
And learn that a white man is better than a nigger.

(Page 68)
As summer approached, David learned of events that ignited the region. Frank Gurley and his cavalrymen, who were being referred to as his “Seven Immortals,” became more active in their attempts to aggravate General Mitchel in Huntsville. At McDavid’s Mill, they captured four sutlers’ wagons and ninety-six bales of cotton that Northern buyers were preparing to ship north. They also made several attacks on the Union garrison at the railroad bridge over Flint River. On one occasion, they killed a Federal soldier and captured another. Annoyed with their constant harassment, the Union army burned the town of Whitesburg to the ground in retribution. Local businessman, “Uncle” Billy Ryan, distributed supplies to Gurley and his men, as well as to needy families in the area. Harper’s Weekly printed a story about General Mitchel’s success in capturing north Alabama down to the Tennessee River, which included Huntsville. The article, embellished with a beautiful painting of the town, enraged David when he saw it.

(Page 76)
On July 1, 1862, President Lincoln signed the Pacific Railroad Act, which laid the foundation for completion of the transcontinental railroad. The track would run from Omaha to Sacramento. Because no Southern state officials were present in Congress, Lincoln took the liberty of having the railroad built through Northern states, thus accentuating their economic prosperity. Once word spread to Ben Johnson’s mercantile, the men who frequented the establishment were, of course, outraged. But one bright spot appeared: General Mitchel was recalled from Huntsville to Washington, charged with failing in his duty to repress pillaging and plundering, and for allowing illegal shipments of cotton to be sent north.

(Page 79)
David stood silently listening, and thought of Percy, surprising himself by feeling a twinge of pity. No one seemed to want the blacks, North or South. How the slaves could ever be freed remained a mystery to him, because even if they were, they wouldn’t have anyplace to go.

(Page 97)
Some of the Rebels managed to converse with the enemy, even though it was strictly forbidden, and exchange their tobacco for much-desired coffee and sugar. After a while, though, a treaty was established, and the Southerners sent across a plank, with a mast made from a current Richmond newspaper. The Federals sent their “boat” to the Southern port, using a mast constructed from a Northern newspaper. Thus, the two sides stayed abreast of what the media was saying.

Search result for 'North' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 1: Chapter One
"...“There can be but little rivalry between ours and any manufacturin’ or navigatin’ community, such as the Northeastern States of the American Union,” said the president-elect. “It must follow, therefore, that mutual interest would invite goodwill and kind offices. If, however, passion or the lust of dominion should cloud the judgment or inflame the ambition of those states, we must prepare to meet the emergency and maintain, ..."
37.
"... the platform. “I reckon he’s referrin’ to the fact that Northern tyranny has suppressed us here in the South,” Jenny’s husband, Nate, said softly, giving an affirmative nod. “And if the Yankees don’t allow us to leave peaceably, we’ll take up arms if need be.” A horse ..."
"...Jefferson Davis rambled on. “Should reason guide the action of the government from which we have separated, a policy so detrimental to the civilized world, the Northern states included, could not be dictated by even the strongest desire to inflict injury upon us; but otherwise a terrible responsibility will rest upon it, and the sufferin’ of millions will bear testimony to the folly and wickedness of our aggressors. In the meantime there will remain to us, ..."
89.
"... to aggravate hostilities with other sections of “this great continent.” “The North,” he continued, “will find that while we are their best customers in peace, we will become their worst enemies in war.” The congregation reveled in his proclamation. Someone near the rear shot off a ..."
96.
"... to the fact that Lincoln’s ticket supported abolition. “Well, before all this occurred,” said Hiram, “there was talk of incorporatin’ us North Alabamians with Tennessee, and makin’ it a whole new country in and of itself.” “I heard about that,” responded Mr. Kimball. “They ..."
97.
"... and makin’ it a whole new country in and of itself.” “I heard about that,” responded Mr. Kimball. “They were fixin’ to call it the Free State of Nickajack, so’s it would be a neutral state betwixt the North and South.” David grinned at the name. He wouldn’t have minded living ..."
"...“It’s a guitar. They’re mighty popular up North. I started makin’ it for you before all this talk of war broke out.” He withdrew a small hand-drawn booklet from his vest pocket. “This shows how to play chords on it, kinda like a pianee.” Giving it to his son, who began studying it intently, he added, “I ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 2: Chapter Two
"...Five days later, Hiram was requested to attend a flag presentation with the rest of the newly enlisted North Alabamians, Company I. The Southern Advocate described the festivities that had transpired the evening before, when the Huntsville Guards were presented with their flag, which rivaled that of another new company, the Madison Rifles. According to the newspaper article, Miss Sallie McKie presented the silk flag to Lieutenant Gus ..."
"...Other members of the North Alabamians, as well as the Huntsville Guards, had already arrived, along with a throng of spectators. All were standing before the courthouse, a white, three-story Greek-revival structure with a large copper-clad dome, and seven wide steps leading up to the entryway. The building and its manicured lawn took up ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 3: Chapter Three
"...The North Alabamians gathered their belongings, mingled about, and then scavenged for something to eat, bartering off one another. The passenger train that had delivered them departed, leaving the soldiers standing haphazardly around the depot. They learned that their destination was Dalton, Georgia, where an Alabama regiment was being formed. At ..."
"...The train embarked on a long ride through pine-covered countryside. After two days of rugged riding, the North Alabamians reached Dalton on May 2. They were the last company from Alabama to arrive. Once the recruits were out of the cars, their respective sergeants began calling roll, and the men responded to their names, after which they were assigned tent partners. Each soldier was given half a ..."
"...ten companies: the Governor’s Guards and the Magnolia Cadets from Dallas County, the Tuskegee Zouaves from Macon County, the Canebrake Rifles of Perry and Marengo Counties, the Conecuh Guards from Conecuh County, the Marion Light Infantry of Perry County, the Lauderdale Guards of Lauderdale County, the Huntsville Guards and North Alabamians from Madison County, and the Larkinsville Guards of Jackson County. The regiment included men from all walks of life, from planters and clergymen to lawyers and physicians. ..."
"...appearance. On the second ballot, Charles Lewis Scott was elected major. He had been a two-term congressman from California at the onset of the war, at which time he returned to Alabama to defend his native state. Edward Dorr Tracy, a Georgia-born lawyer, was elected as captain for the North Alabamians, the company he had created. Tracy’s law partner, David C. Humphreys, was considered to be a Douglas Democrat who had staunchly opposed secession, but once the war became certain, he enlisted in his colleague’s company as a private. He was an experienced military man, having previously served as ..."
"...Within a few weeks, the infantrymen became disenchanted with their new colonel, for he rigorously sent them through routine drills, and relentlessly imposed discipline that the North Alabamians found repetitious and boring. Anxious to fight the Yankees, they grew resentful of the monotony forced upon them, and they were concerned about the colonel’s lack of fighting experience while he had served in the Mexican War. The soldiers’ disgruntlement led to their passing a petition around camp ..."
"...During the month of May, the Confederacy’s capital moved from Montgomery to Richmond, and another southern state, North Carolina, seceded. Hiram learned that the reason for his regiment’s relocation was because Union forces had moved into Virginia and seized Alexandria, which was nearly seventy miles away. Although the situation seemed to be worsening, strangely enough, visitors from Huntsville steadily arrived to see their boys, bringing gifts and ..."
"...Northen marched about two miles North of the junction before being allowed to bivouac near what they learned was referred to as Ball’s Ford. They rested in their temporary camp for a few hours prior to assuming their position, defending a stone bridge that spanned a creek known as the ..."
"...It wasn’t long before the Yankees came into view: their appearance seemed surreal. The men of the 4th Alabama were confronted with the entire advancing Union Army. As they neared, the regiments on either side of the North Alabamians fell away. Colonel Jones ordered his men to hold fast their line of defense while he had them march up a hill to a low fence surrounding a cornfield. ..."
"...Struggling with their obsolete weapons, the soldiers bit off cartridges and loaded their muskets as rapidly as they could. All the while, Colonel Jones sat calmly atop Old Battalion with one leg draped across the pommel of his saddle, observing the enemy’s movements. Upon his command, the North Alabamians rose to deliver a volley, and after waiting for his signal, fell back upon the cool, damp earth. They were spread from the cornfield on their right to a pine woodlot on their left. The men fought on for over an hour, with only artillery to support them. ..."
138.
"... rivulets, but he said nothing. The Yankees fled Northeast toward Washington, and in their chaos, became more panic-stricken, until their escape became a rout. The 4th Alabama, however, could only observe from a distance, since their exhaustion immobilized them. “Has anyone seen my cousin?” ..."
161.
"... Races.” As other reports came in, it was estimated that the 4th Alabama lost nearly two hundred men. Those who survived could feel nothing but animosity toward their foe, for the Northerners were indeed their enemies, out to kill them all … but not if the Rebels killed them first. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 4: Chapter Four
"...way to learn what was happening in Virginia, and he read every detail he could find about the battle. He found out that on July 27, General McClellan was appointed to Commander of the Department of the Potomac, replacing General McDowell, who had failed at the battle, which the Northerners were calling Bull Run and the Rebels were referring to as Manassas. A few days later, on August 6, the Confiscation Act was passed, which permitted the seizure of all property that was being used for insurrection, including slaves. It stripped the slave owners of their property rights, but ..."
"...returned to Huntsville, and on September 6, the city turned out for the largest procession it had ever witnessed. Caroline thought it only proper to attend, so taking her children along, she traveled with Bud’s wife, meeting up with a few other women whose husbands were serving for the North Alabamians as well. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 5: Chapter Five
3.
"... at a time.” The North instigated the Revenue Act of 1861, which placed a federal income tax on all its citizens in order to pay for the increasing war debt. It also established a 3 percent tax on annual incomes exceeding $800, which was far more than what most wage-earners made. By ..."
"...Northd-November, winter in North Alabama made itself known. The ground hardened, the first frost transpired, and hardwood trees dropped their leaves. Several days of gray, gloomy, drizzly weather set in. To occupy their time indoors, Caroline cooked, the girls read voraciously, and the womenfolk sewed clothing for the troops, but ..."
"...new state to vote if it wanted slavery, and for the plantation owners to be compensated for their slaves, should their niggers be set free. But ole ‘Rail Splitter’ Lincoln and his cronies in Congress shot down his bill. Now the poor senator has one son fightin’ for the North, and the other one fightin’ for the South.” ..."
"...School resumed, but classes were intermittent, since the weather dictated participation and attendance. Josie brought home a new grammar book, which focused on the war effort and Confederate superiority over the Northern invaders. The new readers were also chock-full of anti-Yankee sentiment. David found them amusing, as did his little sister, although the propaganda they exuded was somewhat disturbing, in that they promoted the murder of Yankees. ..."
187.
"... Grant for short.” “My younger cousin, Henry, is first lieutenant of Company H, which has been organized right here in Morgan County,” Joseph Ryan proclaimed. “Soon as they git to Tennessee, they’ll whip ole U. S., and send him back up North where he belongs!” David pondered Mr. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 6: Chapter Six
"...The weather had been typical, although Hiram, Bud, and the rest of their regiment thought differently, since they were unaccustomed to Virginia’s snowy winters. General Joe Johnston’s Army of Northern Virginia established their winter quarters, and the camp sprawled from Fredericksburg southwest into the Shenandoah Valley, with the 4th Alabama constructing their site near Manassas Junction at Dumfries. ..."
"...The 4th Alabama’s commanding officers had either returned or resigned. Captain Tracy had been transferred and promoted in August. Major Scott, a typical old Southern gentleman, returned home to recuperate, and was replaced by Captain Bowles. Lawrence Scruggs was appointed captain of the North Alabamians. ..."
11.
"... closest comrades, and he frequently transcribed dictation that amused him. For Blue Hugh’s request, he wrote: May those Northern fanatics who abuse their Southern neighbors, Approach near enough to feel the point of our sabers; May they come near enough to hear the click of a ..."
"...Scott as major. In all, twenty-five officers were replaced. It wasn’t surprising to the men that Law retained his command. He had become close to Confederate General John Bell Hood as a strategic career move and had also positioned himself favorably with influential military personnel and politicians. The remaining North Alabamians reenlisted for three years, hoping that their service wouldn’t be needed for that duration. ..."
"...Northhile, the Confederacy passed the Conscription Act, which required all men aged eighteen years and older to enlist. Many felt the law was a contradiction to state sovereignty, which was what the Confederacy had been founded on. Newspapers reported that Fort Pulaski, located at the mouth of the Savannah River, ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 7: Chapter Seven
"...his hands clasped and his face raised to the sky in prayer while he rode to the front. Later on in the day, General Hood managed to push the Yankees back, prompting some of the men to comment on how General Whiting’s prayers had been answered. One of the North Alabamians, Orderly Sergeant Hartley, and a private from Company A, were sent out as scouts later that evening, but when morning came, only the private returned. Sergeant Hartley had been shot, and the private brought back his bullet-pierced roll book to prove it. Hiram and the rest of Company ..."
"...Northlabamians learned that Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson had been victorious in Winchester, driving General Nathaniel P. Banks’ Union forces North, and had captured scores of Yankee soldiers, as well as their supply wagons. Because of it, the Rebels were referring to the Union general as “Commissary” Banks. Hiram happily contrived a ..."
"...for the battle to resume. Word spread throughout camp that General Johnston had been replaced by General Smith, who hesitated in bringing on an advancing attack. The men wondered about this proxy, because it was known that General Smith was in ill health. Talk of the wounded reached the North Alabamians, who were saddened to learn that one of the casualties was Gus Mastin, the color bearer for the Huntsville Guards. The same silk flag that had been given to him during the presentation ceremony, featuring the name of the Huntsville Female College, had been taken from his lifeless ..."
"...Early in the afternoon, General Lee arrived. The men soon learned that he had been given control of the Confederate army, and that General Smith was relieved of command. Lee promptly renamed his soldiers. What had previously been known as the “Army of the Potomac” became the “Army of Northern Virginia.” For his first act of authority, he commanded his troops to “strike the tent,” and returned them to Richmond. The 4th Alabama had lost eight of their own, and nineteen were wounded. General Whiting was placed in command of the division, while Colonel Law was designated as brigade ..."
"...approached, David learned of events that ignited the region. Frank Gurley and his cavalrymen, who were being referred to as his “Seven Immortals,” became more active in their attempts to aggravate General Mitchel in Huntsville. At McDavid’s Mill, they captured four sutlers’ wagons and ninety-six bales of cotton that Northern buyers were preparing to ship North. They also made several attacks on the Union garrison at the railroad bridge over Flint River. On one occasion, they killed a Federal soldier and captured another. Annoyed with their constant harassment, the Union army burned the town of Whitesburg to the ground ..."
"...Northoys mounted up and rode to the Summers’ farm. David asked his mother for permission, but avoided giving her details about their plans. To his guilty delight, she granted his request. He decided to take Sally, since he didn’t want trouble from an unruly stallion, so he quickly relieved Cotaco ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 8: Chapter Eight
"...Orange Hugh received a gift of admiration from a young Richmond woman named Betsy. They had struck up a conversation one morning when she came to deliver clothing and food to the “orphans,” a nickname the North Alabamians had acquired because they were without correspondence from their loved ones, due to the Yankee occupation in North Alabama. Betsy felt sorry for the young man, so she gave him a small white dog to keep him company, and to remind him of her. Orange Hugh named the ..."
"...On July 1, 1862, President Lincoln signed the Pacific Railroad Act, which laid the foundation for completion of the transcontinental railroad. The track would run from Omaha to Sacramento. Because no Southern state officials were present in Congress, Lincoln took the liberty of having the railroad built through Northern states, thus accentuating their economic prosperity. Once word spread to Ben Johnson’s mercantile, the men who frequented the establishment were, of course, outraged. But one bright spot appeared: General Mitchel was recalled from Huntsville to Washington, charged with failing in his duty to repress pillaging and plundering, and for ..."
76.
"... even though his death was an accident.” “Is that a fact?” asked Mr. Powell. “Reckon so. I was also told that five hundred freed slaves were sent up North by train to Nashville,” Mr. Skidmore went on. “Why?” Ben asked. “To erect Yankee fortifications. From what I was told, they ..."
80.
"... home.” David stood silently listening, and thought of Percy, surprising himself by feeling a twinge of pity. No one seemed to want the blacks, North or South. How the slaves could ever be freed remained a mystery to him, because even if they were, they wouldn’t have anyplace to go. General ..."
92.
"... their progression resumed. The North Alabamians came to a crossing, where they discovered what had held them up. A young man in full Confederate uniform, but without shoes, dangled from an overhead branch, his lifeless body swaying at the end of a horse’s reins. “That’s somebody’s ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 9: Chapter Nine
"...Northth bivouacked between Centreville and Chantilly, cold, exhausted, and soaked to the bone. In the morning, they resumed their march, but once they made Chantilly, General Lee decided to give up the chase, so he turned his troops toward Leesburg. On Saturday, September 6, the Alabamians crossed the Potomac into ..."
"...Around nine o’clock that night, the North Alabamians were moved to outpost duty at a worm-and-hole fence, isolated from the rest of their regiment. Lieutenant Stewart directed them to draw back on their weapons in order to conserve ammunition. The men did their best to make themselves comfortable, although a drizzle had started, and the constant ..."
"...Northlabamians camped in the valley of the Opequon Creek, where they recuperated from their hard campaign. During their hiatus, the men received letters from home, discovering that ties had been restored, due to the departure of the Union army from North Alabama. They waited in anticipation to hear their names ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
"...North glanced around at his comrades, who were entrenched on either side of him, waiting for another Yankee advance. With time to reflect, he thought back to the previous month’s events. The 4th Alabama had abandoned their encampment for Culpeper Court House, and stayed there until November 22, when Lee ..."
"...Northwaited for Burnside to pounce, but their wait was long-lived, for he hesitated. Since the men were required only to attend dress parade and roll call, they idled away their time by staging snowball fights, some so zealous that several soldiers were wounded, and a few were killed. They also ..."
"...forbidden, and exchange their tobacco for much-desired coffee and sugar. After a while, though, a treaty was established, and the Southerners sent across a plank, with a mast made from a current Richmond newspaper. The Federals sent their “boat” to the Southern port, using a mast constructed from a Northern newspaper. Thus, the two sides stayed abreast of what the media was saying. ..."
"...At sunup, the North Alabamians awoke to hear Federal bands playing, and the Union infantrymen scuffling about while they moved, but he couldn’t see anything, due to heavy fog. The 4th marched back to their previous position, where they discovered brisk skirmishing and artillery fire taking place. Burnside had begun harassing the Confederates ..."
"...With his own comrades entrenched on either side of him, Hiram and the North Alabamians observed the fighting. Burnside reignited his attack in earnest at two o’clock by shelling another regiment of Rebels, who stood their ground in a sunken road behind a stone wall. One advance after another tried in vain to break the Confederate stance, but all were unable to penetrate ..."

Search result for 'North' in the FAQs of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

There were no results for 'North' in the FAQs of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Reviews

"Civil war tore families apart, and many of those families fought to stay together every step of the way. "A..."

More Reviews
Share on Facebook Tweet This
Buy this book:
Visit the
A Beautiful Glittering Lie
website
Join J D R Hawkins on Google+
Get a Book Preview website