A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'Rebel' mean?

Find out what Rebel means. Rebel is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Rebel

A soldier who was loyal to the C. S. A. (Confederate States of America). Also known as a Southerner, Sesech, or Confederate. I my novel, A Beautiful Glittering Lie, the term "Rebel" is used as follows:

(Page 32)
News came that Union General George B. McClellan had driven the Confederates out of the Allegheny Mountains, thus bringing the western portion of Virginia under U.S. control. By doing so, he secured himself a nickname, “Little Napoleon.” A short time later, it was reported that the U.S. Sanitary Commission had been founded by a group of New York women who intended to promote healthful practices within the ranks. Although Rebel forces had no such committee, they followed suit with similar designs.

(Page 33)
For some reason, the Union Army ceased firing at noon. Bracing themselves for another attack, the Rebels utilized the time to check their firearms. Word came that artillery was running low, which caused a slight panic, but Jones assured his men that they could win the battle before their ammunition ran out.

(Page 34)
General Bee ordered his men to retreat to a nearby hill. The Rebels fell behind it, and fortified the hill. Surprisingly, the field began to grow quiet, except for the frantic wails of injured soldiers. To the Alabamians’ relief, the Federals were retreating. With one hand, Hiram withdrew his pocket watch, and wiped sweat from his brow with the other. Clicking the timepiece open, he saw that it was nearly five o’clock. The battle had gone on for seven hours.

(Pages 34-35)
Soldiers from other regiments wandered into camp, describing the turmoil that had swirled around them. Brigadier General J. E. B. Stuart, Confederate cavalry commander, had hurled his cavaliers into the New York Zouaves, and as the Yankees retreated, all hell broke loose. Civilians from Washington City had driven over to witness the battle, bringing along their ladies, complete with picnic lunches, parasols, and fine carriages. However, when the Federals “skedaddled,” they almost killed the Washington elite. An artillery shell worsened the situation when it hit a wagon, clogging the road that had been their escape route. Congressman Healy was captured by the Confederates and taken prisoner. The Rebels were calling it the “Bull Run Races.”

(Page 35)
As other reports came in, it was estimated that the 4th Alabama lost nearly two hundred men. Those who survived could feel nothing but animosity toward their foe, for the northerners were indeed their enemies, out to kill them all … but not if the Rebels killed them first.

(Page 39)
Although he knew he was going against his mother’s wishes, David went out of his way to learn what was happening in Virginia, and he read every detail he could find about the battle. He found out that on July 27, General McClellan was appointed to Commander of the Department of the Potomac, replacing General McDowell, who had failed at the battle, which the Northerners were calling Bull Run and the Rebels were referring to as Manassas. A few days later, on August 6, the Confiscation Act was passed, which permitted the seizure of all property that was being used for insurrection, including slaves. It stripped the slave owners of their property rights, but didn’t actually free the slaves, so they were considered property of the U.S. government.

(Page 56)
The war started to revive. Robert E. Lee had been defeated at Cheat Mountain, but the Rebels came out victorious at Balls Bluff. Two more states joined the Confederacy—Missouri and Kentucky. By March, Johnston moved his army to the Rappahannock River. The Alabamians were anxious for a fight.

(Page 57)
With the advent of April, the Rebels were informed that McClellan was gathering his Union troops in preparation for a march on Richmond, and they knew it wouldn’t be long before they were called upon for defense. It was just a matter of time.

(Page 57)
The family learned three days later that a great battle was taking place in Tennessee, near Shiloh Church, which was only about eighty miles from Huntsville. Reports of the battle were carried in by courier. David eagerly hovered around Ben Johnson’s in anticipation of incoming telegrams, and while he was there, a courier rode in. According to the messenger, some twenty thousand troops were converging on the area, and the fighting was bloody. Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston had been killed, and the Union army had been chased back to Pittsburg Landing on the Tennessee River. From the looks of things, the Rebels were victorious, according to the dispatch rider, who immediately set off toward Huntsville to retrieve more information. Waving his hat in the air, he let out a whoop and rode away.

(Page 60)
The situation was worsening in Huntsville, as Union soldiers went on a rampage. Their commander, Ormsby Mitchel, turned a blind eye to his soldiers’ pilfering. Federal gunboats patrolled up and down the Tennessee River, shelling towns and settlements along the banks. The Yankees burned, plundered, and foraged from the poor displaced souls, and raiding parties became more frequent. When David learned of the abomination, he considered joining up with a local group of Rebels who were retaliating. These guerrillas, as they were known, were a force to be reckoned with, for even though their group was small, they were fiercely lethal.

(Page 67)
Inexplicably, Union forces backed off, so the Rebels were able to continue on unmolested until they reached the outskirts of Richmond. They camped there for three weeks. During that time, the men managed to obtain news that on May 15, the CSS Alabama had been launched from England, and five days later, the Homestead Act was signed into law. Before the war, Southern states had opposed the act because of its anti-slavery sentiment, but now there were no Southern states represented in Congress to contest it. The act allowed settlers to occupy, improve, and farm 160-acre parcels of land in the Western territories for five years, but without the use of slaves. If, after that time, the farmers were successful in establishing a farmstead, the land was theirs to keep.

(Page 67)
The Alabamians learned that Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson had been victorious in Winchester, driving General Nathaniel P. Banks’ Union forces north, and had captured scores of Yankee soldiers, as well as their supply wagons. Because of it, the Rebels were referring to the Union general as “Commissary” Banks. Hiram happily contrived a song about their revered general that soon caught on in camp.

(Page 74)
In the early morning coolness, Hiram marched alongside his comrades, noticing his surroundings as he traveled. Mockingbirds sang from overhanging tree limbs, as did orioles, flickers, and red-winged blackbirds, while they flitted above in the shimmering leaves. He could hear soldiers singing behind him, as well as the echoes of clomping boots and horses’ hooves. The dew-covered grass smelled fresh and clean. At 10:00 a.m., the Rebels reached a bridge that had been partially destroyed by Union pickets, who were now on the opposite side, felling trees to impede them.

(Page 74)
They advanced across. The stench of smoke and sulfur rose up to meet them as they fell victim to the waiting Union artillery and small guns. The roar was nearly deafening, and several men fell screaming to their deaths while the regiment progressed. Smoke was so thick and suffocating that the Rebels choked and coughed. They could barely see ten feet in front of them, but they knew they had to persevere. The Alabamians advanced to find a brigade of A. P. Hill’s Virginians lying in front of the enemy’s lines. Hill, in his distinctive red shirt, rode up and down the line, immune to the shelling. Out of ammunition, and too exhausted to move, the Virginians were forced to endure the shower of bullets and shrapnel that hailed down upon them.

(Page 74)
The 4th Alabama responded, as if they were in a dress parade, until they passed the Virginians. Given the command, the Rebels charged, bounding toward their foe with a shrill, screeching yell.

(Page 75)
The Confederates jumped into the Union breastworks, stampeding like cattle. In response, the Federals broke and ran as the Alabamians thundered up the ascent to the second line of defense. The Yankees from the first line swept through the second, and all turned tail. The Rebels kept shrieking, cursing, and running in pursuit. They attacked the third line that waited at the top of the hill. The Union soldiers panicked and fell back, retreating at a run to avoid the charging Confederates, who fired a successful volley into the fleeing enemy. Before the Federals could remove their artillery pieces, the Rebels captured fourteen of them. As the Alabamians watched their enemies escape, their voices rose up in triumphant cheers, which spread through the ranks.

(Page 75)
On June 29, the Rebels crossed the bridge and followed the retreating Union army to Malvern Hill, where McClellan made a stand. The 4th Alabama was subjected to heavy artillery fire while they supported their batteries, until darkness fell, when they were forced to endure a heavy thunderstorm.

(Page 76)
The Union army was far superior in numbers and rations, although McClellan had been fooled into thinking otherwise. The Rebels realized that they had an enormous task before them, but they were willing to accept the challenge, because they adored “Bobby” Lee and Colonel Law. Their loyalty ran deep, even though the men were all too familiar with hunger, as well as discomfort brought on by rain and vermin. Despite new clothing, their shoes were wearing thin. Regardless, they still intended to keep their vow to the Confederacy. Hiram was no different. He fully intended to see the thing through, because his conscience wouldn’t allow it any other way. It was his duty to remain.

(Page 77)
Union sympathizers arrived in Decatur and made it their mission to report Rebels who were hiding in the hills. Union Colonel Abel Streight decided to pursue the offenders, so he took a regiment of infantry and one company of cavalry into the mountains to hunt them down. The cavalry was attacked by Confederate scouts, so they returned to Decatur, but the infantry was successful in capturing the fugitives, and forced them to enlist with the 1st Alabama Cavalry. On July 10, they were inducted into the Union Army.

(Page 79)
By August 20, both corps joined together, and continued on across the Rapidan River toward Culpeper Court House. Pope discovered their advance, so he withdrew across the Rappahannock. Once the Rebels arrived, the people of Culpeper came out to greet them, cheering and waving flags in welcome. Some told horror stories of how they had been abused by Pope’s Union army. Others described how Pope’s own men despised him because of his arrogant, pompous nature, and how Pope’s bombastic braggadocio deflated his troops’ morale.

(Page 79)
Two days later, the Rebels continued their pursuit of the Federals. They reached the Rappahannock, and moved upriver under constant shelling from their adversaries. The 4th Alabama was ordered to the front of the advancing Confederates. They charged, driving the Yankees into the river. As a result, many who couldn’t swim drowned, while others were killed or captured.

(Page 80)
The effusion of blood raged on. Jackson’s right brigade pressed the Yankees, and managed to capture one of their three-inch rifles. At six o’clock, a large portion of the enemy’s artillery, as well as their infantry, started up the turnpike toward the Alabamians, who were ordered to charge. The Federals reacted by firing their artillery into the advancing Rebels. Members of Colonel Law’s brigade were blown to pieces, their appendages torn from their torsos, and their broken bodies hurled through the air. Blood splattered down like a rapid downpour, mixed with dirt and shrapnel. Several others were hit by flying metal, and screamed in agony as they writhed to the ground.

(Page 80)
Colonel Law ordered his men to halt. He then positioned them across the pike, but at 1:00 a.m., General Hood, Law’s superior, ordered them to abandon their position, along with the captured howitzer, and return to their original position. Through the course of the night, they obtained little sleep, because the loud banging of guns, roar of cannons, and tramp of infantrymen prevented it. By the time the sun rose on the morning of Saturday, August 30, all of the Rebel corps had reached the field, extending from Groveton across the pike to Bull Run below the Stone Bridge.

(Page 83)
General Pope bragged that his “headquarters were in the saddle,” but the Rebels teased that his headquarters were where his hindquarters ought to be. With the advent of September, Pope proved their philosophy was accurate by retreating back to Washington. General Jackson, in hot pursuit, soon caught up to the Union general. The Alabamians, who were trailing behind, heard the report of cannons ahead as Jackson and Pope confronted one another.

(Page 83)
On strict orders to respect the citizens, the Rebels were on their best behavior, and didn’t disturb anything. Upon entering Maryland, they received an icy reception, which was not at all what they had expected. The Marylanders heard from Union sympathizers in Europe that Lee expected to conscript all able-bodied men for his army, and even though that wasn’t the case, their sentiments were equally divided. Hiram overheard a few spectators, who were observing their march from open second-story windows, comment on how they couldn’t distinguish the generals from the enlisted men, because they were all in filthy tatters. General Lee ordered his regimental bands to play “Maryland, My Maryland.” His men cheered while they marched through, but they were later disappointed, for they were unable to successfully recruit enough soldiers to replenish their depleted ranks.

(Page 84)
Around nine o’clock that night, the North Alabamians were moved to outpost duty at a worm-and-hole fence, isolated from the rest of their regiment. Lieutenant Stewart directed them to draw back on their weapons in order to conserve ammunition. The men did their best to make themselves comfortable, although a drizzle had started, and the constant noise of moving caissons and artillery kept the hungry, exhausted Rebels awake. About an hour later, the sound of tramping boots came toward them. Captain Scruggs, who had replaced Colonel McLemore, gave the order to fire. Every gun exploded in a flash of fire at the same instant. The sounds of retreating footsteps and moaning wounded persisted for several minutes. After a while, everything grew quiet again. Not even a cricket chirped, which Hiram and Bud agreed was spooky. They sat in silence, straining to hear if more Yankees were approaching. Hiram’s heart beat wildly with anticipation, and his breathing was erratic.

(Page 86)
The Confederates advanced into the trees, skirmishing with their enemies as they drove them out. Captain Scruggs, who fell wounded, was quickly replaced by Captain Robbins. Realizing that they were at an advantage, the Rebels shot down scores of Yankees while concealing themselves in the cover of trees, fighting savagely despite their extreme hunger and fatigue. Other regiments of their brigade, the Texans, South Carolinians, and Georgians, were out in the open on their left, and suffered because of it. As dawn began to lighten the sky, Hiram noticed a Union general riding around the field on a large white horse.

(Page 86)
Yankee artillery fired into General Hood’s right flank and rear, causing the Rebels to fall back. The ground was scattered with bodies, most of which were clad in blue. Many Confederate soldiers had exhausted their ammunition when Lieutenant Stewart informed them that they had been fighting for nearly three hours straight. Fearing that the enemy would chase after them, they quickly re-formed, but discovered their haste was unnecessary, as the Yankees failed to respond. The Alabamians took much-needed time to replenish their ammunition and catch their breath.

(Page 87)
McClellan attempted to chase after the Rebels, and some of his troops captured four Confederate cannons. On the morning of September 20, the Federals were driven back across the Potomac, where they remained. Apparently, McClellan was satisfied with himself enough to sit back on his laurels.

(Page 88)
Two days later, on September 22, Abraham Lincoln announced his Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, freeing slaves in Confederate states, but not in Union or neutral states. No blacks were allowed into Lincoln’s home state of Illinois, and the president didn’t contest it. The Rebels thought him a hypocrite, since he was freeing slaves he had no control over, but the ones he had the power to liberate remained enslaved. Eight days later, the men learned that their beloved commander, Colonel McLemore, had died after a prolonged decline. The next day, they moved their camp to a location between Bunker Hill and Winchester, where they remained until the latter part of October, living on captured provisions and food they obtained from local farmers.

(Page 93)
David stayed informed by acquiring current editions of the Huntsville Confederate, which had been reduced down to only one sheet folded into two pages, due to the paper shortage. Major changes were taking place within both armies. As of November 10, Alabama had supplied over sixty thousand men to the Confederate cause. President Lincoln replaced McClellan yet again, this time with General Burnside, not so much because of Burnside’s performance at the recent Battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam as the Yankees were calling it, but because of his displayed abilities at First Manassas. Frustrated that “Little Napoleon” had refused to aggressively pursue and attack the Rebels by inaccurately assuming he was outnumbered, Lincoln was quoted as saying to him, “If you don’t want to use the army, I should like to borrow it for a while.”

(Page 97)
Hiram glanced around at his comrades, who were entrenched on either side of him, waiting for another Yankee advance. With time to reflect, he thought back to the previous month’s events. The 4th Alabama had abandoned their encampment for Culpeper Court House, and stayed there until November 22, when Lee discovered that Burnside was headed north from Richmond, so he assembled his troops near the quaint town of Fredericksburg. The Confederate army swelled to almost twice its size, due to returning soldiers who had become ill prior to their march into Maryland. Remaining on the south side of the icy Rappahannock River, the Rebels gazed at the church spires that rose up from the town like bony, skeletal fingers, reaching to the heavens for sanctuary.

(Page 97)
Some of the Rebels managed to converse with the enemy, even though it was strictly forbidden, and exchange their tobacco for much-desired coffee and sugar. After a while, though, a treaty was established, and the Southerners sent across a plank, with a mast made from a current Richmond newspaper. The Federals sent their “boat” to the Southern port, using a mast constructed from a Northern newspaper. Thus, the two sides stayed abreast of what the media was saying.

(Page 97)
At dawn on December 11, the Rebels’ heavy artillery report sounded the alarm: two shots fired in quick succession signaled the Union army’s advance across the river. The 4th fell out and took their position in line. They heard heavy firing down in the town and learned that McLaws’ Division was shooting at the Yankees to prevent them from constructing pontoon bridges.

(Page 98)
Early the following morning, the enemy began firing, but the Rebels held off so as not to disclose the locations of their guns. Hiram lay in wait, watching as General Jackson rode by, dressed in a crisp new uniform, followed by Generals Stuart and Lee. The day was a repeat of the previous one, and when darkness fell, the men returned to their winter quarters to secure rations, since their food supply had vastly improved upon their arrival to Fredericksburg. Warm and comfortable, most fell asleep right away, but Hiram stayed awake, penning a letter to his wife by firelight.

(Page 98)
The fog remained heavy until ten o’clock, when it lifted to reveal a wave of bluecoats moving across an open field. The Rebels watched the spectacle in awe. Tens of thousands of Yankees moved like a slithering blue serpent, sparkling with silver from sunlight glinting off their bayonets.

(Pages 98-99)
They came up from the town as though on parade, and appeared to be unstoppable, like they would keep going over and through the Confederate line. With grape, shell, and shot, the Rebel guns immediately began their deadly work, pouring a storm of lead into the advancing foe, and they blew holes into the dark, solid columns, which were filled in like water rushing around a fractured dam. The thunderous salvos of cannonade shook the ground, retorted by the Yankees’ counter-barrage. The men in gray let loose a bloodcurdling Rebel yell and fired a storm of lead canister into the faces of their enemies as they approached, which was enough to send the bluecoats reeling. They stumbled, taking cover behind the bank. A line of colorful Zouaves passed them, but they could not withstand the Rebel onslaught either. They fell back in confusion.

(Page 99)
With his own comrades entrenched on either side of him, Hiram and the North Alabamians observed the fighting. Burnside reignited his attack in earnest at two o’clock by shelling another regiment of Rebels, who stood their ground in a sunken road behind a stone wall. One advance after another tried in vain to break the Confederate stance, but all were unable to penetrate the line. The Yankees marched up the hill until there were so many of their dead clogging the battlefield that the advancing Federals were unable to climb over them. The frozen ground in the sunken road gave way to mud and slush beneath the feet of hundreds of thrashing combatants. Some slipped and fell on grass made slick with the blood of their fellow soldiers. At last, twilight engulfed the battlefield, forcing the Yankees to fall back.

(Page 99)
When at last the order was given to march, it was late afternoon. The men moved down the road at a double quick until they reached the front, where they formed a line of battle. Subjected to heavy shelling, the veteran Alabamians crested a hill to observe a newly formed brigade of Rebels retreat as fast as their legs could carry them, while the gunners, covered in powder from head to foot, frantically loaded and fired their pieces. All around, bullets whizzed, shells burst, and men yelled and cursed.

(Page 101)

The men awoke to find it was raining, as it usually did after a battle. They discovered that Burnside’s Federals had crossed the river overnight, demoralized into retreating to Washington. A wave of cheers rushed over the Rebel ranks. While the rain dissipated to drizzle, Bud, who was still in a daze, followed some of his comrades out onto the battlefield, which was covered with dead Yankee soldiers. It was obvious from what they saw that the Union army had suffered almost complete annihilation. Some of the Federals died trying to use their comrades’ bodies as shields. What it must have been like to lie in wait while bullets thudded into the bodies of their friends, Bud could only speculate. Besides corpses dressed in blue, some wore Zouave uniforms, while others adorned their trappings with Kelly green. Blue Hugh said they were with the Irish Brigade, because he had heard that they wore green boxwood sprigs in their caps to display their heritage. The barefoot Confederates immediately set to work, relieving the rigid bodies of their footwear and clothing, as well as their haversacks’ contents. Bud replaced his worn-out brogans, which had developed holes in their soles long ago.
Blue Hugh found a young, handsome Yankee boy, lying dead amongst the others, and motioned Bud over. Inside his knapsack, they discovered chocolate and numerous love letters, which Blue Hugh began to read mockingly over the body.

(Page 102)
The Alabamians were told that Fredericksburg had been left in terrible condition. The Yankees were allowed to freely loot, ransack, burn, and pillage anything and everything, which infuriated the Rebels. Bud decided that the pity he had felt while on the battlefield was wasted. Those bastards don’t deserve my sympathy, he reasoned. The invaders caused too many innocents to suffer, and although they had been led like obedient lambs to slaughter, they got what they deserved for desecrating the good Southern people of Fredericksburg. It’s God’s wrath at work, he decided. They brought on their own destruction.

(Page 104)
Absorbed in his dismal thoughts, he rounded a corner, and heard a horse blow. He looked up to see a group of Rebel soldiers ride toward him. One of them accosted his buckskin by grabbing hold of the reins while the other four surrounded him.

(Page 106)
Down flocked the soldiers to the banks,
Till, margined with its pebbles,
One wooded shore was blue with “Yanks,”
And one was gray with “Rebels.”

(Page 107)

The conscious stream with burnished glow
Went proudly o’er its pebbles,
But thrilled throughout its deepest flow
With yelling of the Rebels.

(Page 107)
Again a pause, and then again
The trumpets pealed sonorous,
And “Yankee Doodle” was the strain
To which the shore gave chorus.
The laughing ripple shoreward flew,
To kiss the shining pebbles;
Loud shrieked the swarming Boys in Blue
Defiance to the Rebels.

(Page 107)
The sad, slow stream its noiseless flood
Poured o’er the glistening pebbles;
All silent now the Yankees stood,
And silent stood the Rebels.

(Page 107)
But memory, waked by music’s art,
Expressed in simplest numbers,
Subdued the sternest Yankee’s heart,
Made light the Rebel’s slumbers.

Search result for 'Rebel' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 3: Chapter Three
"...western portion of Virginia under U.S. control. By doing so, he secured himself a nickname, “Little Napoleon.” A short time later, it was reported that the U.S. Sanitary Commission had been founded by a group of New York women who intended to promote healthful practices within the ranks. Although Rebel forces had no such committee, they followed suit with similar designs. ..."
"...For some reason, the Union Army ceased firing at noon. Bracing themselves for another attack, the Rebels utilized the time to check their firearms. Word came that artillery was running low, which caused a slight panic, but Jones assured his men that they could win the battle before their ammunition ran out. ..."
"...General Bee ordered his men to retreat to a nearby hill. The Rebels fell behind it, and fortified the hill. Surprisingly, the field began to grow quiet, except for the frantic wails of injured soldiers. To the Alabamians’ relief, the Federals were retreating. With one hand, Hiram withdrew his pocket watch, and wiped sweat from his brow with the other. Clicking the ..."
"...with picnic lunches, parasols, and fine carriages. However, when the Federals “skedaddled,” they almost killed the Washington elite. An artillery shell worsened the situation when it hit a wagon, clogging the road that had been their escape route. Congressman Healy was captured by the Confederates and taken prisoner. The Rebels were calling it the “Bull Run Races.” ..."
161.
"... Races.” As other reports came in, it was estimated that the 4th Alabama lost nearly two hundred men. Those who survived could feel nothing but animosity toward their foe, for the northerners were indeed their enemies, out to kill them all … but not if the Rebels killed them first. ..."

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Chapter 4: Chapter Four
"...Virginia, and he read every detail he could find about the battle. He found out that on July 27, General McClellan was appointed to Commander of the Department of the Potomac, replacing General McDowell, who had failed at the battle, which the Northerners were calling Bull Run and the Rebels were referring to as Manassas. A few days later, on August 6, the Confiscation Act was passed, which permitted the seizure of all property that was being used for insurrection, including slaves. It stripped the slave owners of their property rights, but didn’t actually free the slaves, so they ..."

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Chapter 6: Chapter Six
7.
"... The war started to revive. Robert E. Lee had been defeated at Cheat Mountain, but the Rebels came out victorious at Balls Bluff. Two more states joined the Confederacy—Missouri and Kentucky. By March, Johnston moved his army to the Rappahannock River. The Alabamians were anxious for a fight. ..."
20.
"... resemble cannon snouts. With the advent of April, the Rebels were informed that McClellan was gathering his Union troops in preparation for a march on Richmond, and they knew it wouldn’t be long before they were called upon for defense. It was just a matter of time. David spent his ..."
"...rode in. According to the messenger, some twenty thousand troops were converging on the area, and the fighting was bloody. Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston had been killed, and the Union army had been chased back to Pittsburg Landing on the Tennessee River. From the looks of things, the Rebels were victorious, according to the dispatch rider, who immediately set off toward Huntsville to retrieve more information. Waving his hat in the air, he let out a whoop and rode away. ..."
"...pilfering. Federal gunboats patrolled up and down the Tennessee River, shelling towns and settlements along the banks. The Yankees burned, plundered, and foraged from the poor displaced souls, and raiding parties became more frequent. When David learned of the abomination, he considered joining up with a local group of Rebels who were retaliating. These guerrillas, as they were known, were a force to be reckoned with, for even though their group was small, they were fiercely lethal. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 7: Chapter Seven
"...Inexplicably, Union forces backed off, so the Rebels were able to continue on unmolested until they reached the outskirts of Richmond. They camped there for three weeks. During that time, the men managed to obtain news that on May 15, the CSS Alabama had been launched from England, and five days later, the Homestead Act was signed ..."
"...The Alabamians learned that Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson had been victorious in Winchester, driving General Nathaniel P. Banks’ Union forces north, and had captured scores of Yankee soldiers, as well as their supply wagons. Because of it, the Rebels were referring to the Union general as “Commissary” Banks. Hiram happily contrived a song about their revered general that soon caught on in camp. ..."
184.
"... after them. He laughed, causing some of the other soldiers to chuckle. David couldn’t help himself. Rebelliously, he started whistling his favorite song, the “Bonnie Blue Flag.” The soldiers stopped laughing and stared. Once the boys had crossed the bridge, they climbed up on Stella’s ..."

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Chapter 8: Chapter Eight
"...sang from overhanging tree limbs, as did orioles, flickers, and red-winged blackbirds, while they flitted above in the shimmering leaves. He could hear soldiers singing behind him, as well as the echoes of clomping boots and horses’ hooves. The dew-covered grass smelled fresh and clean. At 10:00 a.m., the Rebels reached a bridge that had been partially destroyed by Union pickets, who were now on the opposite side, felling trees to impede them. ..."
"...across. The stench of smoke and sulfur rose up to meet them as they fell victim to the waiting Union artillery and small guns. The roar was nearly deafening, and several men fell screaming to their deaths while the regiment progressed. Smoke was so thick and suffocating that the Rebels choked and coughed. They could barely see ten feet in front of them, but they knew they had to persevere. The Alabamians advanced to find a brigade of A. P. Hill’s Virginians lying in front of the enemy’s lines. Hill, in his distinctive red shirt, rode up and down ..."
10.
"... One, two, three, four! One, two, three, four!” The 4th Alabama responded, as if they were in a dress parade, until they passed the Virginians. Given the command, the Rebels charged, bounding toward their foe with a shrill, screeching yell. Caught in the whirlwind, Hiram charged fearlessly. ..."
"...The Confederates jumped into the Union breastworks, stampeding like cattle. In response, the Federals broke and ran as the Alabamians thundered up the ascent to the second line of defense. The Yankees from the first line swept through the second, and all turned tail. The Rebels kept shrieking, cursing, and running in pursuit. They attacked the third line that waited at the top of the hill. The Union soldiers panicked and fell back, retreating at a run to avoid the charging Confederates, who fired a successful volley into the fleeing enemy. Before the Federals could ..."
16.
"... On June 29, the Rebels crossed the bridge and followed the retreating Union army to Malvern Hill, where McClellan made a stand. The 4th Alabama was subjected to heavy artillery fire while they supported their batteries, until darkness fell, when they were forced to endure a heavy thunderstorm. ..."
"...The Union army was far superior in numbers and rations, although McClellan had been fooled into thinking otherwise. The Rebels realized that they had an enormous task before them, but they were willing to accept the challenge, because they adored “Bobby” Lee and Colonel Law. Their loyalty ran deep, even though the men were all too familiar with hunger, as well as discomfort brought on by rain and vermin. ..."
"...Union sympathizers arrived in Decatur and made it their mission to report Rebels who were hiding in the hills. Union Colonel Abel Streight decided to pursue the offenders, so he took a regiment of infantry and one company of cavalry into the mountains to hunt them down. The cavalry was attacked by Confederate scouts, so they returned to Decatur, but the infantry ..."
"...By August 20, both corps joined together, and continued on across the Rapidan River toward Culpeper Court House. Pope discovered their advance, so he withdrew across the Rappahannock. Once the Rebels arrived, the people of Culpeper came out to greet them, cheering and waving flags in welcome. Some told horror stories of how they had been abused by Pope’s Union army. Others described how Pope’s own men despised him because of his arrogant, pompous nature, and how Pope’s bombastic braggadocio ..."
"...Two days later, the Rebels continued their pursuit of the Federals. They reached the Rappahannock, and moved upriver under constant shelling from their adversaries. The 4th Alabama was ordered to the front of the advancing Confederates. They charged, driving the Yankees into the river. As a result, many who couldn’t swim drowned, while others ..."
"...pressed the Yankees, and managed to capture one of their three-inch rifles. At six o’clock, a large portion of the enemy’s artillery, as well as their infantry, started up the turnpike toward the Alabamians, who were ordered to charge. The Federals reacted by firing their artillery into the advancing Rebels. Members of Colonel Law’s brigade were blown to pieces, their appendages torn from their torsos, and their broken bodies hurled through the air. Blood splattered down like a rapid downpour, mixed with dirt and shrapnel. Several others were hit by flying metal, and screamed in agony as they writhed ..."
"...captured howitzer, and return to their original position. Through the course of the night, they obtained little sleep, because the loud banging of guns, roar of cannons, and tramp of infantrymen prevented it. By the time the sun rose on the morning of Saturday, August 30, all of the Rebel corps had reached the field, extending from Groveton across the pike to Bull Run below the Stone Bridge. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 9: Chapter Nine
"...General Pope bragged that his “headquarters were in the saddle,” but the Rebels teased that his headquarters were where his hindquarters ought to be. With the advent of September, Pope proved their philosophy was accurate by retreating back to Washington. General Jackson, in hot pursuit, soon caught up to the Union general. The Alabamians, who were trailing behind, heard the report of ..."
"...On strict orders to respect the citizens, the Rebels were on their best behavior, and didn’t disturb anything. Upon entering Maryland, they received an icy reception, which was not at all what they had expected. The Marylanders heard from Union sympathizers in Europe that Lee expected to conscript all able-bodied men for his army, and even though that ..."
"...isolated from the rest of their regiment. Lieutenant Stewart directed them to draw back on their weapons in order to conserve ammunition. The men did their best to make themselves comfortable, although a drizzle had started, and the constant noise of moving caissons and artillery kept the hungry, exhausted Rebels awake. About an hour later, the sound of tramping boots came toward them. Captain Scruggs, who had replaced Colonel McLemore, gave the order to fire. Every gun exploded in a flash of fire at the same instant. The sounds of retreating footsteps and moaning wounded persisted for several minutes. ..."
"...The Confederates advanced into the trees, skirmishing with their enemies as they drove them out. Captain Scruggs, who fell wounded, was quickly replaced by Captain Robbins. Realizing that they were at an advantage, the Rebels shot down scores of Yankees while concealing themselves in the cover of trees, fighting savagely despite their extreme hunger and fatigue. Other regiments of their brigade, the Texans, South Carolinians, and Georgians, were out in the open on their left, and suffered because of it. As dawn began to ..."
"...Yankee artillery fired into General Hood’s right flank and rear, causing the Rebels to fall back. The ground was scattered with bodies, most of which were clad in blue. Many Confederate soldiers had exhausted their ammunition when Lieutenant Stewart informed them that they had been fighting for nearly three hours straight. Fearing that the enemy would chase after them, they quickly re-formed, ..."
80.
"... McClellan attempted to chase after the Rebels, and some of his troops captured four Confederate cannons. On the morning of September 20, the Federals were driven back across the Potomac, where they remained. Apparently, McClellan was satisfied with himself enough to sit back on his laurels. ..."
"...Two days later, on September 22, Abraham Lincoln announced his Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, freeing slaves in Confederate states, but not in Union or neutral states. No blacks were allowed into Lincoln’s home state of Illinois, and the president didn’t contest it. The Rebels thought him a hypocrite, since he was freeing slaves he had no control over, but the ones he had the power to liberate remained enslaved. Eight days later, the men learned that their beloved commander, Colonel McLemore, had died after a prolonged decline. The next day, they moved their ..."

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Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
"...yet again, this time with General Burnside, not so much because of Burnside’s performance at the recent Battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam as the Yankees were calling it, but because of his displayed abilities at First Manassas. Frustrated that “Little Napoleon” had refused to aggressively pursue and attack the Rebels by inaccurately assuming he was outnumbered, Lincoln was quoted as saying to him, “If you don’t want to use the army, I should like to borrow it for a while.” ..."
"...headed north from Richmond, so he assembled his troops near the quaint town of Fredericksburg. The Confederate army swelled to almost twice its size, due to returning soldiers who had become ill prior to their march into Maryland. Remaining on the south side of the icy Rappahannock River, the Rebels gazed at the church spires that rose up from the town like bony, skeletal fingers, reaching to the heavens for sanctuary. ..."
"...Some of the Rebels managed to converse with the enemy, even though it was strictly forbidden, and exchange their tobacco for much-desired coffee and sugar. After a while, though, a treaty was established, and the Southerners sent across a plank, with a mast made from a current Richmond newspaper. The Federals sent their ..."
"...At dawn on December 11, the Rebels’ heavy artillery report sounded the alarm: two shots fired in quick succession signaled the Union army’s advance across the river. The 4th fell out and took their position in line. They heard heavy firing down in the town and learned that McLaws’ Division was shooting at the Yankees to ..."
"...Early the following morning, the enemy began firing, but the Rebels held off so as not to disclose the locations of their guns. Hiram lay in wait, watching as General Jackson rode by, dressed in a crisp new uniform, followed by Generals Stuart and Lee. The day was a repeat of the previous one, and when darkness fell, the men ..."
122.
"... The fog remained heavy until ten o’clock, when it lifted to reveal a wave of bluecoats moving across an open field. The Rebels watched the spectacle in awe. Tens of thousands of Yankees moved like a slithering blue serpent, sparkling with silver from sunlight glinting off their bayonets. ..."
"...They came up from the town as though on parade, and appeared to be unstoppable, like they would keep going over and through the Confederate line. With grape, shell, and shot, the Rebel guns immediately began their deadly work, pouring a storm of lead into the advancing foe, and they blew holes into the dark, solid columns, which were filled in like water rushing around a fractured dam. The thunderous salvos of cannonade shook the ground, retorted by the Yankees’ counter-barrage. The ..."
"...With his own comrades entrenched on either side of him, Hiram and the North Alabamians observed the fighting. Burnside reignited his attack in earnest at two o’clock by shelling another regiment of Rebels, who stood their ground in a sunken road behind a stone wall. One advance after another tried in vain to break the Confederate stance, but all were unable to penetrate the line. The Yankees marched up the hill until there were so many of their dead clogging the battlefield ..."
"...the order was given to march, it was late afternoon. The men moved down the road at a double quick until they reached the front, where they formed a line of battle. Subjected to heavy shelling, the veteran Alabamians crested a hill to observe a newly formed brigade of Rebels retreat as fast as their legs could carry them, while the gunners, covered in powder from head to foot, frantically loaded and fired their pieces. All around, bullets whizzed, shells burst, and men yelled and cursed. ..."
"...The men awoke to find it was raining, as it usually did after a battle. They discovered that Burnside’s Federals had crossed the river overnight, demoralized into retreating to Washington. A wave of cheers rushed over the Rebel ranks. While the rain dissipated to drizzle, Bud, who was still in a daze, followed some of his comrades out onto the battlefield, which was covered with dead Yankee soldiers. It was obvious from what they saw that the Union army had suffered almost complete annihilation. Some of the ..."
"...The Alabamians were told that Fredericksburg had been left in terrible condition. The Yankees were allowed to freely loot, ransack, burn, and pillage anything and everything, which infuriated the Rebels. Bud decided that the pity he had felt while on the battlefield was wasted. Those bastards don’t deserve my sympathy, he reasoned. The invaders caused too many innocents to suffer, and although they had been led like obedient lambs to slaughter, they got what they deserved for desecrating the ..."
228.
"... the dark, overcast sky. Absorbed in his dismal thoughts, he rounded a corner, and heard a horse blow. He looked up to see a group of Rebel soldiers ride toward him. One of them accosted his buckskin by grabbing hold of the reins while the other four surrounded him. “What’s the meanin’ ..."

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