A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'recruit' mean?

Find out what recruit means. Recruit is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

recruit

A term used to describe new soldiers, that were not conscripted, drafted, or forced to enlist. In my novel, A Beautiful Glittering Lie, the term "recruit" is used as follows:

(Page 12)
“And ole Jeff Davis said somethin’ about bein’ ready by recruitin’ an army,” Hiram was saying. His mother and sisters looked over at David as he entered.

(Page 20)
Following the ceremony, each officer was given a bouquet of flowers, and to each enlistee, a newly constructed Confederate uniform was distributed. The jackets were gray homespun wool with a row of nine shiny brass buttons down the front. Kepis were allotted as headwear, and brogans for footwear. Every man was instructed to bring his own firearm and ammunition if possible, as well as knives and hygienic items. The pastor dispersed small Testaments, blessing each soldier while he went down the line, and telling them that they were expected to learn not only duty to their country, but also how to fight the great moral battle of life. The recruits were then ordered to return the following Monday to the Huntsville Depot for departure. Before the evening’s festivities ended, members of the new company exchanged vows with each other, stating that they would protect one another like brethren “to the death.”

(Page 25)
The soldiers were ordered to form lines eight souls across and march to the train station. Their families followed, and when they walked around the three-story brick depot, they saw a train waiting to take the new recruits to their destination. Steam vaporized up around the mighty driving wheels of the locomotive. The Stars and Bars flew from a flagstaff above the engine, and every passenger car lined behind was decked out in patriotic bunting. The soldiers stood milling about, waiting for their orders while conversing with loved ones. Through the throng, an officer emerged, and raised his voice above the din.

(Page 27)
Once the car was empty, the sergeant started down the line, calling roll while he moved amongst the new recruits. Hiram glanced down the row, noticing that one sergeant was assigned to each passenger car, and they were all walking up and down their lines, too.

(Page 27)
He pointed to a grand, century-old sycamore. Underneath, several staff officers stood, some smoking fat cigars, all staring at the new recruits, and summing them up, Hiram was certain. He and Bud gave sidelong glances to each other. Bud suppressed a smirk.

(Page 28)
The recruit looked up at him. “I’m jist takin’ notation of our travels,” he said with a grin. He protruded his hand, and Hiram courteously took it. “Name’s Anderson,” the young man stated. “George Anderson.”

(Page 28)
The train embarked on a long ride through pine-covered countryside. After two days of rugged riding, the North Alabamians reached Dalton on May 2. They were the last company from Alabama to arrive. Once the recruits were out of the cars, their respective sergeants began calling roll, and the men responded to their names, after which they were assigned tent partners. Each soldier was given half a small white tent, and taught how to combine the two pieces in order to provide shelter. After they had built their temporary homes, they stood in line again to receive rations, and were served breakfast on tin plates that they were instructed to keep, as well as tin cups. They indulged in cornbread, steak, fried potatoes, eggs, and coffee, all provided by the local townsfolk. Upon finishing their meal, they lined up to receive additional provisions, including haversacks, gum cloths, canteens, blankets, and roll straps. Smooth-bored muskets were distributed to those without their own guns, to which the men grunted, knowing the weapons were relics. Some of the soldiers who had brought along extra money purchased additional accoutrements from the commissary, but they soon found out that the items were significantly overpriced, so most did without.

(Page 29)
Two days later, at 10:00 p.m., the men arrived in Lynchburg amidst pouring rain. Through the drenching downpour, they managed to erect their tents, light measly fires, and cook meager meals consisting of stale cornbread and bacon. Some of the new recruits complained incessantly, but Hiram only snickered at their whining, chalking it up to inexperience and youthfulness. Many enlistees were fresh off the farm, he could tell, and had never endured inclement weather. For their sake, he hoped they would toughen up quickly.

(Page 29)
On the following day, May 6, Arkansas seceded from the Union, and on the following day, the 4th Alabama was inducted into Confederate service, mustered in for the duration of one year. Following several days of idleness, the recruits embarked yet again via train to Strasburg, Virginia, arriving on May 11. The weather had become partly cloudy, to the men’s delight. They rested in the afternoon, and prepared rations for the next day’s march that evening.

(Page 30)
The regiment joined with General Joseph E. Johnston’s Army of the Shenandoah, and was attached to Brigadier General Barnard E. Bee’s Third Brigade. For the remainder of the week, the recruits enjoyed their leisurely life, faithfully attended Sunday services, read their prayer books, and learned how to fend for themselves by performing duties traditionally left for the womenfolk, such as cooking and darning. The soldiers received sewing kits called housewives, and variations of religious literature from the Army Christian Association, pamphlets that were referred to as tracts, and entitled, “Prepare for Battle,” “A Mother’s Parting Words to Her Soldier Boy,” and “Sufferings of the Lost.” The Alabamians filled their time with scripture, or sang hymns, such as “Nearer My God to Thee” and “How Sweet the Sound.”

(Page 56)
In early spring, some officers and reenlisted men were sent home for sixty days to secure recruits. By March, they had returned, and the regiment was once again replete of its losses. Meanwhile, some of the remaining Alabamians suffered from another epidemic, yellow jaundice, for which the common treatment was enemas.

(Page 83)
On strict orders to respect the citizens, the Rebels were on their best behavior, and didn’t disturb anything. Upon entering Maryland, they received an icy reception, which was not at all what they had expected. The Marylanders heard from Union sympathizers in Europe that Lee expected to conscript all able-bodied men for his army, and even though that wasn’t the case, their sentiments were equally divided. Hiram overheard a few spectators, who were observing their march from open second-story windows, comment on how they couldn’t distinguish the generals from the enlisted men, because they were all in filthy tatters. General Lee ordered his regimental bands to play “Maryland, My Maryland.” His men cheered while they marched through, but they were later disappointed, for they were unable to successfully recruit enough soldiers to replenish their depleted ranks.

(Page 83)
One man they did recruit, however, was Bernard Kelton, who substituted for his brother. He was a stocky young man with a pleasant disposition, and because of it, Bud and Hiram took to him right away. Another was Dozier Downs, a thin, scruffy-looking character with shifty eyes.

Search result for 'recruit' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 1: Chapter One
119.
"... around the rough-hewn pine table that his father had constructed. “And ole Jeff Davis said somethin’ about bein’ ready by recruitin’ an army,” Hiram was saying. His mother and sisters looked over at David as he entered. “Come sit down and eat your vittles before they git cold,” his ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 2: Chapter Two
"...possible, as well as knives and hygienic items. The pastor dispersed small Testaments, blessing each soldier while he went down the line, and telling them that they were expected to learn not only duty to their country, but also how to fight the great moral battle of life. The recruits were then ordered to return the following Monday to the Huntsville Depot for departure. Before the evening’s festivities ended, members of the new company exchanged vows with each other, stating that they would protect one another like brethren “to the death.” ..."
"...The soldiers were ordered to form lines eight souls across and march to the train station. Their families followed, and when they walked around the three-story brick depot, they saw a train waiting to take the new recruits to their destination. Steam vaporized up around the mighty driving wheels of the locomotive. The Stars and Bars flew from a flagstaff above the engine, and every passenger car lined behind was decked out in patriotic bunting. The soldiers stood milling about, waiting for their orders while conversing with ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 3: Chapter Three
5.
"... place in line. Once the car was empty, the sergeant started down the line, calling roll while he moved amongst the new recruits. Hiram glanced down the row, noticing that one sergeant was assigned to each passenger car, and they were all walking up and down their lines, too. “Soldiers of ..."
15.
"... over yonder …” He pointed to a grand, century-old sycamore. Underneath, several staff officers stood, some smoking fat cigars, all staring at the new recruits, and summing them up, Hiram was certain. He and Bud gave sidelong glances to each other. Bud suppressed a smirk. “… at seven ..."
22.
"... writin’?” he asked politely. The recruit looked up at him. “I’m jist takin’ notation of our travels,” he said with a grin. He protruded his hand, and Hiram courteously took it. “Name’s Anderson,” the young man stated. “George Anderson.” “Hiram Summers. Glad to meet ..."
"...The train embarked on a long ride through pine-covered countryside. After two days of rugged riding, the North Alabamians reached Dalton on May 2. They were the last company from Alabama to arrive. Once the recruits were out of the cars, their respective sergeants began calling roll, and the men responded to their names, after which they were assigned tent partners. Each soldier was given half a small white tent, and taught how to combine the two pieces in order to provide shelter. After they ..."
"...Two days later, at 10:00 p.m., the men arrived in Lynchburg amidst pouring rain. Through the drenching downpour, they managed to erect their tents, light measly fires, and cook meager meals consisting of stale cornbread and bacon. Some of the new recruits complained incessantly, but Hiram only snickered at their whining, chalking it up to inexperience and youthfulness. Many enlistees were fresh off the farm, he could tell, and had never endured inclement weather. For their sake, he hoped they would toughen up quickly. ..."
"...On the following day, May 6, Arkansas seceded from the Union, and on the following day, the 4th Alabama was inducted into Confederate service, mustered in for the duration of one year. Following several days of idleness, the recruits embarked yet again via train to Strasburg, Virginia, arriving on May 11. The weather had become partly cloudy, to the men’s delight. They rested in the afternoon, and prepared rations for the next day’s march that evening. ..."
"...The regiment joined with General Joseph E. Johnston’s Army of the Shenandoah, and was attached to Brigadier General Barnard E. Bee’s Third Brigade. For the remainder of the week, the recruits enjoyed their leisurely life, faithfully attended Sunday services, read their prayer books, and learned how to fend for themselves by performing duties traditionally left for the womenfolk, such as cooking and darning. The soldiers received sewing kits called housewives, and variations of religious literature from the Army Christian Association, ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 6: Chapter Six
"...In early spring, some officers and reenlisted men were sent home for sixty days to secure recruits. By March, they had returned, and the regiment was once again replete of its losses. Meanwhile, some of the remaining Alabamians suffered from another epidemic, yellow jaundice, for which the common treatment was enemas. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 9: Chapter Nine
"...windows, comment on how they couldn’t distinguish the generals from the enlisted men, because they were all in filthy tatters. General Lee ordered his regimental bands to play “Maryland, My Maryland.” His men cheered while they marched through, but they were later disappointed, for they were unable to successfully recruit enough soldiers to replenish their depleted ranks. ..."
4.
"... ranks. One man they did recruit, however, was Bernard Kelton, who substituted for his brother. He was a stocky young man with a pleasant disposition, and because of it, Bud and Hiram took to him right away. Another was Dozier Downs, a thin, scruffy-looking character with shifty eyes. “My ..."

Search result for 'recruit' in the FAQs of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

There were no results for 'recruit' in the FAQs of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Search result for 'recruit' in Glossary of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

kepi
brogan
conscript
housewives
army
brigade
canteen
company
Confederate
musket
Rebel
recruit
regiment
Union
Reviews

"The history is intertwined ingeniously into the plot. It is well plotted and the narrative moves along at nice clip...."

More Reviews
Share on Facebook Tweet This
Buy this book:
Visit the
A Beautiful Glittering Lie
website
Join J D R Hawkins on Google+
Get a Book Preview website