A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'regiment' mean?

Find out what regiment means. Regiment is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

regiment

A unit of Civil War soldiers, usually comprised of between 1,000 and 1,5000 men. Regiments were designated by state and number, such as the 4th Alabama.

1 company = 50-100 men
10 companies = 1 regiment
4 regiments = 1 brigade
2-5 brigades = 1 division
2+ divisions = 1 corps
1+ corps = 1 army

In my novel, A Beautiful Glittering Lie, the term "regiment" is used as follows:

(Page 4)

R.T. Cole (posthumously)
Mr. Cole served as an adjutant in the 4th Regiment, Alabama Volunteer Infantry. Because he had the foresight and fortitude to record his thoughts and actions in his diary, the events in this novel are very accurate. Without his documentation, many of the specifics detailing what the 4th Alabama went through would be lost to history.

(Page 16)
Two quiet weeks passed. He helped his father plant rows of peas, and tilled the soil, preparing it for corn and sorghum. Their peacefulness didn’t last long, for news came that Fort Sumter, off the coast of South Carolina in Charleston Harbor, had been bombarded by Confederate forces and captured. Two days later, President Lincoln called for 75,000 volunteers, evidence that a war was now truly imminent. On April 17, Virginia seceded, and two days later, a mob of Southern sympathizers in Baltimore attacked the 6th Massachusetts Regiment while it marched through on its way to Washington. Newspapers reported that four soldiers and twenty rioters were killed.

(Page 28)
The North Alabamians gathered their belongings, mingled about, and then scavenged for something to eat, bartering off one another. The passenger train that had delivered them departed, leaving the soldiers standing haphazardly around the depot. They learned that their destination was Dalton, Georgia, where an Alabama regiment was being formed. At the designated time, they congregated near the enormous sycamore tree, and waited in the warm sunshine. Nearly an hour passed before a freight train arrived. Ordered to line up, the men were loaded into boxcars. Several complained about being treated no better than cattle, but the circumstances didn’t improve. Soon, the train pulled out.

(Pages 28-29)
Almost immediately, voting began to determine who would lead what was now known as the 4th Alabama Infantry Regiment, consisting of fourteen hundred men and ten companies: the Governor’s Guards and the Magnolia Cadets from Dallas County, the Tuskegee Zouaves from Macon County, the Canebrake Rifles of Perry and Marengo Counties, the Conecuh Guards from Conecuh County, the Marion Light Infantry of Perry County, the Lauderdale Guards of Lauderdale County, the Huntsville Guards and North Alabamians from Madison County, and the Larkinsville Guards of Jackson County. The regiment included men from all walks of life, from planters and clergymen to lawyers and physicians.

(Page 30)
One of the men, George Washington Jones, who was an assistant quartermaster of the regiment, guffawed. “All the South wants is her independence!” he declared.

(Page 30)
The regiment joined with General Joseph E. Johnston’s Army of the Shenandoah, and was attached to Brigadier General Barnard E. Bee’s Third Brigade. For the remainder of the week, the recruits enjoyed their leisurely life, faithfully attended Sunday services, read their prayer books, and learned how to fend for themselves by performing duties traditionally left for the womenfolk, such as cooking and darning. The soldiers received sewing kits called housewives, and variations of religious literature from the Army Christian Association, pamphlets that were referred to as tracts, and entitled, “Prepare for Battle,” “A Mother’s Parting Words to Her Soldier Boy,” and “Sufferings of the Lost.” The Alabamians filled their time with scripture, or sang hymns, such as “Nearer My God to Thee” and “How Sweet the Sound.”

(Page 30)
Soon, their situation drastically changed, as more drills and fatigue details were continually expected of them. The men were driven through a gauntlet of routines. Following reveille at 4:00 a.m., they were drilled as an entire regiment from 4:30 until 7:00 a.m., when they broke for breakfast. General inspection was at 8:00 a.m., and the company drill lasted from 9:00 until noon. After midday break, another drill session commenced, lasting from 2:30 until 5:30. A dress parade immediately followed. Supper was served at 6:30, roll call was at 9:00, and tattoo was at 9:30, when all lights were extinguished. Most drill sessions were led by Colonel Jones’ protégé, Private Humphreys.

(Page 30)
During the month of May, the Confederacy’s capital moved from Montgomery to Richmond, and another southern state, North Carolina, seceded. Hiram learned that the reason for his regiment’s relocation was because Union forces had moved into Virginia and seized Alexandria, which was nearly seventy miles away. Although the situation seemed to be worsening, strangely enough, visitors from Huntsville steadily arrived to see their boys, bringing gifts and letters. Citizens from home temporarily took their own places in the ranks as privates, readying for the fight, but the Yankees failed to appear, and rumors of the Federals’ impending advances proved to be false.

(Page 30)
Word reached the troops that on May 24, a New York infantry regiment led by Colonel Elmer Ellsworth arrived in Alexandria. A large Southern flag had been displayed from the Marshall House Hotel, which was visible from Washington. The colonel attempted to remove it himself, but was shot in the chest with a double-barrel shotgun by the proprietor of the hotel, James W. Jackson, who in return was shot and bayoneted to death. Few members of the 4th Alabama expressed remorse for the loss of Ellsworth, especially since he had been a close friend of President Lincoln. In their opinion, it was only a shame that Jackson had been murdered for defending his rights.

(Page 33)
It wasn’t long before the Yankees came into view: their appearance seemed surreal. The men of the 4th Alabama were confronted with the entire advancing Union Army. As they neared, the regiments on either side of the North Alabamians fell away. Colonel Jones ordered his men to hold fast their line of defense while he had them march up a hill to a low fence surrounding a cornfield.

(Page 33)
General Bee galloped over to the regiment and commanded them by calling out, “Up, Alabamians!”

(Page 33)
After two hours of quiet, the Yankees resumed their assault, and the Confederates fought off several Union advances. Men in colorful garb fashioned after French Algerian Zouaves attacked first, but were driven back. Then came, one at a time, three other regiments, but all eventually broke and ran. Their uniforms caused confusion, for men on either side were dressed in both blue and gray, including Colonel Jones, who wore the blue uniform he had donned while previously serving in the U.S. Army.

(Page 33)
The men spied two unknown regiments clad in gray, approaching in a line on their right. Assuming they were Confederates, the Alabamians signaled by raising their hands to their caps while giving the password, “our homes,” and the unknown regiment signaled back by mirroring the action. Law ordered his soldiers to form a line behind the new arrivals. As soon as the 4th unfurled their flags, they were quickly surprised when the culprits turned and opened fire on them. Several men were shot, screaming in agony while the deceivers perpetrated their lines. Others reacted by bursting into hysterical laughter, contrary to what the situation demanded.

(Page 33)
The 4th Alabama was finally flanked. As the regiment was commanded to retire, Old Battalion was hit in the leg, forcing Colonel Jones to dismount. In a hail of bullets, he too was hit in both thighs, and crumbled to the ground with a broken left leg. Law immediately took command, managing to retire his troops, but was compelled to leave Jones on the field because Union soldiers had forded Bull Run River. Major Scott went down, shot through the leg. Law fell next, his arm broken by a Yankee’s bullet, and was quickly taken from the field. The remaining Alabamians now had no one to guide them. They stood in mass confusion while men writhed around them on the ground, bloody and dying. Smoke and thunder filled the air.

(Page 33)

He then asked for volunteers to retrieve Jones, but was convinced by another captain that the effort was futile. At a loss, the regiment awaited orders, watching survivors from other divisions scatter or huddle together in a nearby ravine.

(Page 33)
Another man asked the general to place the regiment in position, to which Johnston replied that he would, once he analyzed the situation, and the generals rode off.

(Page 33)
As the regiment moved left, an artillery battery cut through their ranks. Bee and his army veered right, while the rest of the regiment moved forward into the woods.

(Page 33)
hurricane of bullets to await further orders. Suddenly, James Alexander fell, a bullet piercing his abdomen, and sending his entrails splattering. Bud witnessed the young man’s terrible injury, but was unable to assist. Although in shock, he retreated with his regiment in a tornado of chaos. He and Hiram trailed behind, and as they retreated, Hiram overheard Bee address Jackson.

(Page 35)
Later in the day, President Davis rode at a gallop past the regiment on his way to the front. At sundown, the men found their way back, and rested in their bivouac, reflecting on the day’s events. They felt miserable about their performance, because they had turned their backs to the Yankees and retreated. The camp died down, with only the sounds of chirping crickets in the distance.

(Pages 35-36)
Soldiers from other regiments wandered into camp, describing the turmoil that had swirled around them. Brigadier General J. E. B. Stuart, Confederate cavalry commander, had hurled his cavaliers into the New York Zouaves, and as the Yankees retreated, all hell broke loose. Civilians from Washington City had driven over to witness the battle, bringing along their ladies, complete with picnic lunches, parasols, and fine carriages. However, when the Federals “skedaddled,” they almost killed the Washington elite. An artillery shell worsened the situation when it hit a wagon, clogging the road that had been their escape route. Congressman Healy was captured by the Confederates and taken prisoner. The Rebels were calling it the “Bull Run Races.”

(Page 37)

“Our brave men fell in great numbers, but they died as the brave love to die—with faces to the foe, fighting in the holy cause of liberty.”
—Captain Thomas Goldsby, 4th Alabama Infantry Regiment

(Page 38)
Ben returned the smile. “Right glad to hear it.” He handed her a newspaper. “The editor of this paper, Mr. William Figures, has a son who’s with your husband’s regiment.”

(Pages 38-39)
“No, Ma. I quit doin’ that.” He handed her the fish. Noticing the newspaper lying on the table, he gazed at the front page. “Governor Moore gave a speech about Pa’s regiment!” he exclaimed, and read on. “It says here that he praises the accomplishments of the 4th Alabama for chasin’ off four regiments of Yankees. And in return, the state legislature has given its official thanks and distinction for their remarkable display of cohesion and fightin’ ability. They’re heroes!” He grinned, and with a laugh, added, “They’re callin’ it the Great Skedaddle, because the Yankees ran away!”

(Pages 39-40)
Digging his heels into Joe Boy’s flanks, they rode toward the edge of the city. They turned a corner, and noticing a small division of soldiers marching ahead, they decided to follow, staying back far enough so as not to be detected. The soldiers kept marching to a wooded area along Big Spring Branch, where hundreds of others were drilling. Behind the soldiers, rows of horse stables lined the edge of the woods. David and Jake slid off Joe Boy, tied him to a shrub, and stealthily stole to the top of an incline. They looked down upon the regiment, watching as the group they had followed fell in, took their place among the others, and obeyed their commander’s orders to “About face.” The men moved in unison, responding to each call the officer made. He hollered, “Attention,” and they stood erect in anticipation of his next command. The officer barked other orders. The men lifted their fire irons simultaneously, raised them as though they were taking aim, and placed them back down when the officer yelled, “At ease.”

(Page 40)
“I have,” David volunteered. “He’s the commander of my pa’s regiment.”

(Page 41)
“That’s First Lieutenant Joseph Wheeler. He’s formin’ this here regiment, the nineteenth Alabama.”

(Page 43)
On October 7, state leaders announced that Alabama had supplied twenty-seven thousand troops to the Confederacy thus far. This included sixty infantry regiments, thirteen cavalry regiments, six battalions, and twenty batteries. The war was ramping up, that much was certain.

(Page 55)
The weather had been typical, although Hiram, Bud, and the rest of their regiment thought differently, since they were unaccustomed to Virginia’s snowy winters. General Joe Johnston’s Army of Northern Virginia established their winter quarters, and the camp sprawled from Fredericksburg southwest into the Shenandoah Valley, with the 4th Alabama constructing their site near Manassas Junction at Dumfries.

(Page 56)
In early spring, some officers and reenlisted men were sent home for sixty days to secure recruits. By March, they had returned, and the regiment was once again replete of its losses. Meanwhile, some of the remaining Alabamians suffered from another epidemic, yellow jaundice, for which the common treatment was enemas.

(Page 59)
Hiram’s regiment, which was camped at Yorktown, reorganized on April 21, due to the fact that the one-year commitment many soldiers gave upon their enlistment expired. William Rivers, whose cousin, James Alexander, had been killed at Manassas, opted to resign his position. He was so heartbroken over the loss of his cousin that he deemed himself worthless as a fighting soldier, and so, after bidding his company farewell, he departed for home with several others.

(Page 66)
McClellan’s army occupied Yorktown. Hiram’s regiment was bivouacked among George Washington’s old breastworks, which were still plainly visible. Many expressed pride in fighting for their liberty, just as the patriots of the Revolution had done. Because they were without utensils, the men resorted to cooking “Indian style” by placing dough on peeled hickory bark and setting it over their campfires to bake bread, or skewing their food on sticks and holding it over the open flames. They managed to acquire a good amount of oysters, which they relished with delight. The regimental pets had dwindled down to only a few dogs. Mysteriously, the chickens had disappeared, although Hiram and Bud knew they had all been eaten. The goat, it was discovered, had developed an appetite for kepis. He too vanished soon after, most likely into a stew.

(Pages 66-67)
The following morning, they learned that a regiment of Union soldiers had gotten ahead of them in an attempt to cut them off. General Whiting, the brigade commander, galloped past them on his steed, his hands clasped and his face raised to the sky in prayer while he rode to the front. Later on in the day, General Hood managed to push the Yankees back, prompting some of the men to comment on how General Whiting’s prayers had been answered. One of the North Alabamians, Orderly Sergeant Hartley, and a private from Company A, were sent out as scouts later that evening, but when morning came, only the private returned. Sergeant Hartley had been shot, and the private brought back his bullet-pierced roll book to prove it. Hiram and the rest of Company I once again felt sorrow, for although Hartley had been from Connecticut, he was well liked, and a true Confederate patriot.

(Page 67)
On the evening of May 30, Hiram’s regiment was ordered to march a few miles east of Richmond, where they bivouacked in a grove of oak trees. The men of Company G, the Marion Light Infantry, stacked their guns against one of the oaks, and went to sleep beneath it. During the night, a terrible electrical storm blew in. A bolt of lightning hit the tree, destroyed the guns, killed one soldier, and injured forty-six others. The 4th Alabama expressed sadness for losing their comrades before they were ordered to march. Hiram wondered if such a great loss was a terrible indication of what was to come, but he kept his daunting thoughts to himself.

(Pages 67-68)
Early the following morning, the Alabamians traveled eight miles to the beat of their drums toward Seven Pines and their foe. The Stars and Bars, St. Andrews Cross, the regimental colors, and the Bonnie Blue Flag all flew gallantly above the advancing Confederates. Once they arrived, they saw that the Union army had been driven out, for all that remained were their empty tents. Throughout the course of the day, the 4th was maneuvered to different locations, but still didn’t see any fighting. By evening, they had been placed on the Richmond and York River railroad tracks. The empty camp was in a patch of woods to their left, and an active Union battery was in front of them.

(Page 68)
As soon as the men took their position, the Union soldiers opened fire. The Alabamians were forced to endure an unmerciful bombardment, since no other regiment appeared to support them. While they lay in wait, tolerating the shelling, General Johnston slowly rode up to them. He sat upon his mount, staring off at the advancing Union army. Suddenly, a piece of shell struck him in the shoulder, knocking him off his horse. As rapidly as he had fallen, a group of litter bearers besieged him and carried him off the field.

(Page 68)
Because the position of the regiment was on open ground, it moved at twilight toward the cover of trees and the abandoned Yankee camp, but before the men reached their refuge, another shell exploded in their midst, killing several. Agonized screams pierced the air, and the survivors yelled and cursed as they fled. Union soldiers advanced toward them in the dark. Their voices carried across the field, so the Alabamians could tell they were being pursued. Hiram and his comrades turned and fired upon their adversaries. The Yankees returned the volley. Fighting continued for several minutes until the Federals retired.

(Page 72)
Leering at them, Owen said, “He’s in my regiment.”

(Page 74)
“Our home was the regiment, and the farther we got from our native state the more we became attached to it.”
—Private William Watson, 3rd Louisiana Infantry

(Page 74)
On June 17, General Lee sent the 4th Alabama and Hood’s Texans to the Shenandoah Valley to support Stonewall Jackson, while Union General McDowell was ordered to defend Washington against Jackson’s advance. Hiram’s regiment marched 150 miles, and was allowed to rest for only one day during the journey. Eight days later, the men bivouacked near Ashland, twelve miles from Richmond. Circling around McClellan’s army, they were now behind it. The following morning, General Lee pursued the fleeing Federals.

(Page 75)
They advanced across. The stench of smoke and sulfur rose up to meet them as they fell victim to the waiting Union artillery and small guns. The roar was nearly deafening, and several men fell screaming to their deaths while the regiment progressed. Smoke was so thick and suffocating that the Rebels choked and coughed. They could barely see ten feet in front of them, but they knew they had to persevere. The Alabamians advanced to find a brigade of A. P. Hill’s Virginians lying in front of the enemy’s lines. Hill, in his distinctive red shirt, rode up and down the line, immune to the shelling. Out of ammunition, and too exhausted to move, the Virginians were forced to endure the shower of bullets and shrapnel that hailed down upon them.

(Page 75)
It was discovered the following day that the 4th Alabama lost twenty-three, including Captain Armistead and Captain Price, and 109 were either wounded or missing. Jim Harrison of Company D received admiration for his ability to capture twenty-three men and an officer. In the excitement of battle, he had unintentionally jumped into a trench filled with Federals, so he shot one and took the rest prisoner. Among the Yankees captured by the Confederates was Colonel McLemore’s old regiment, the 8th U.S. Infantry, which he had resigned from at the onset of the war.

(Page 76)
Union sympathizers arrived in Decatur and made it their mission to report Rebels who were hiding in the hills. Union Colonel Abel Streight decided to pursue the offenders, so he took a regiment of infantry and one company of cavalry into the mountains to hunt them down. The cavalry was attacked by Confederate scouts, so they returned to Decatur, but the infantry was successful in capturing the fugitives, and forced them to enlist with the 1st Alabama Cavalry. On July 10, they were inducted into the Union Army.

(Page 81)
The day progressed in much the same way as the preceding one, and again at 4:00 p.m., the skirmishing amplified to heavy fighting, which involved troops close to the Alabamians. Because the regiment was located on an elevation, they were able to see the entire battle play out before them in panoramic view.

(Page 83)
On strict orders to respect the citizens, the Rebels were on their best behavior, and didn’t disturb anything. Upon entering Maryland, they received an icy reception, which was not at all what they had expected. The Marylanders heard from Union sympathizers in Europe that Lee expected to conscript all able-bodied men for his army, and even though that wasn’t the case, their sentiments were equally divided. Hiram overheard a few spectators, who were observing their march from open second-story windows, comment on how they couldn’t distinguish the generals from the enlisted men, because they were all in filthy tatters. General Lee ordered his regimental bands to play “Maryland, My Maryland.” His men cheered while they marched through, but they were later disappointed, for they were unable to successfully recruit enough soldiers to replenish their depleted ranks.

(Page 84)
That evening, the regiment was ordered to position itself on the Sharpsburg and Hagerstown Pike, about a mile from Sharpsburg near the Dunker Church, which was a simple, small, whitewashed, one-story structure sans steeple. The men learned that it was named after German Baptist immigrants, who baptized their brethren in the creek, thus acquiring the nickname “dunkers.” The soldiers remained there under heavy shelling throughout the next day until sunset, when McClellan sent a force across the Antietam River, so they moved forward to meet it. They marched through an open field while a cyclone of shells burst around them, and along with the clatter of their musketry, created such a ruckus that their commanders’ orders were lost in the din. Few were hit, however, and as dusk set in, the explosion of colors set off by the shells gave a spectacular display.

(Page 84)
Around nine o’clock that night, the North Alabamians were moved to outpost duty at a worm-and-hole fence, isolated from the rest of their regiment. Lieutenant Stewart directed them to draw back on their weapons in order to conserve ammunition. The men did their best to make themselves comfortable, although a drizzle had started, and the constant noise of moving caissons and artillery kept the hungry, exhausted Rebels awake. About an hour later, the sound of tramping boots came toward them. Captain Scruggs, who had replaced Colonel McLemore, gave the order to fire. Every gun exploded in a flash of fire at the same instant. The sounds of retreating footsteps and moaning wounded persisted for several minutes. After a while, everything grew quiet again. Not even a cricket chirped, which Hiram and Bud agreed was spooky. They sat in silence, straining to hear if more Yankees were approaching. Hiram’s heart beat wildly with anticipation, and his breathing was erratic.

(Page 84)
The men were too terrified to speak further. After what seemed like hours, a regiment of Georgians showed up to relieve them of their post. Learning that General Jackson had arrived on the field, the Alabamians returned to Dunker Church, partook in a few rations, and tried to sleep.

(Page 86)
The Confederates advanced into the trees, skirmishing with their enemies as they drove them out. Captain Scruggs, who fell wounded, was quickly replaced by Captain Robbins. Realizing that they were at an advantage, the Rebels shot down scores of Yankees while concealing themselves in the cover of trees, fighting savagely despite their extreme hunger and fatigue. Other regiments of their brigade, the Texans, South Carolinians, and Georgians, were out in the open on their left, and suffered because of it. As dawn began to lighten the sky, Hiram noticed a Union general riding around the field on a large white horse.

(Page 86)
While they walked across the field, which was strewn with bodies, they tried not to look into the pinched faces, whose eyes stared vacantly up at the sunny morning sky. Young men not more than eighteen, their cheeks once rosy with the blossom of vigor and manhood, lay cold and still, bathing in their own hearts’ blood. Some didn’t even look human, while others were missing heads, arms, legs, or torsos. Several members of the regiment scurried around the battlefield, placing the wounded on stretchers. The victims cried out in anguish, their blood leaking from their broken bodies like fractured wine bottles as they were carried away. Bud heard a persistent whimpering sound, so he followed it, and walked around an enormous oak tree, its trunk riddled with bullet holes.

(Page 95)
“The pox. My whole regiment came down with it. I reckon you heard about my brother.”

(Page 98)
With his own comrades entrenched on either side of him, Hiram and the North Alabamians observed the fighting. Burnside reignited his attack in earnest at two o’clock by shelling another regiment of Rebels, who stood their ground in a sunken road behind a stone wall. One advance after another tried in vain to break the Confederate stance, but all were unable to penetrate the line. The Yankees marched up the hill until there were so many of their dead clogging the battlefield that the advancing Federals were unable to climb over them. The frozen ground in the sunken road gave way to mud and slush beneath the feet of hundreds of thrashing combatants. Some slipped and fell on grass made slick with the blood of their fellow soldiers. At last, twilight engulfed the battlefield, forcing the Yankees to fall back.

(Page 100)
At the advent of dawn, shelling and skirmishing resumed. Hiram’s regiment moved out into the open, near the edge of a wood. All fell eerily quiet while they waited for the command. Noticing two captains and an adjutant nearby, Bud decided to join in on their conversation, for he was curious to hear their plan of action. As he neared, a ball ricocheted, narrowly missed Hiram, and headed straight toward the threesome. Several men yelled out warnings, but one of the captains reacted too late. He was struck directly in the chest, his torso turned into a mass of jellylike flesh as he collapsed in a heap. Before the litter bearers could deliver him to the field hospital, he was dead.

(Page 102)
It had stopped raining, but bitter cold replaced it. Upon returning to camp, Bud and his comrades learned that they had lost five, with seventeen wounded. Their regiment didn’t fire a single shot. The Yankees, it was estimated, lost over nine thousand after making fourteen assaults that were all beaten back. The men heard of one brave soul, Sergeant Kirkland of South Carolina, who acquired a reputation as the “Angel of Marye’s Heights” for crossing enemy lines and benevolently tending to the Union wounded by providing them with blankets and water. John Pelham, an Alabama son who was in charge of Jackson’s artillery, received praise from General Lee for bravely executing an effective barrage by deceiving the Yankees into thinking his numbers were far greater than they actually were, and holding their lines in the process.

(Page 104)
“Which regiment you with?” inquired another, whose face was hidden behind a thick amber beard.

Search result for 'regiment' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 1: Chapter One
"...regimentt weeks passed. He helped his father plant rows of peas, and tilled the soil, preparing it for corn and sorghum. Their peacefulness didn’t last long, for news came that Fort Sumter, off the coast of South Carolina in Charleston Harbor, had been bombarded by Confederate forces and captured. Two ..."

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Chapter 3: Chapter Three
"...The North Alabamians gathered their belongings, mingled about, and then scavenged for something to eat, bartering off one another. The passenger train that had delivered them departed, leaving the soldiers standing haphazardly around the depot. They learned that their destination was Dalton, Georgia, where an Alabama regiment was being formed. At the designated time, they congregated near the enormous sycamore tree, and waited in the warm sunshine. Nearly an hour passed before a freight train arrived. Ordered to line up, the men were loaded into boxcars. Several complained about being treated no better than cattle, but ..."
"...Tuskegee Zouaves from Macon County, the Canebrake Rifles of Perry and Marengo Counties, the Conecuh Guards from Conecuh County, the Marion Light Infantry of Perry County, the Lauderdale Guards of Lauderdale County, the Huntsville Guards and North Alabamians from Madison County, and the Larkinsville Guards of Jackson County. The regiment included men from all walks of life, from planters and clergymen to lawyers and physicians. ..."
53.
"... to wage war on us, for we can defy the world if they invade us.” One of the men, George Washington Jones, who was an assistant quartermaster of the regiment, guffawed. “All the South wants is her independence!” he declared. “I’ll drink to that!” another man, Enoch Campbell, ..."
"...The regiment joined with General Joseph E. Johnston’s Army of the Shenandoah, and was attached to Brigadier General Barnard E. Bee’s Third Brigade. For the remainder of the week, the recruits enjoyed their leisurely life, faithfully attended Sunday services, read their prayer books, and learned how to fend for themselves by ..."
"...Soon, their situation drastically changed, as more drills and fatigue details were continually expected of them. The men were driven through a gauntlet of routines. Following reveille at 4:00 a.m., they were drilled as an entire regiment from 4:30 until 7:00 a.m., when they broke for breakfast. General inspection was at 8:00 a.m., and the company drill lasted from 9:00 until noon. After midday break, another drill session commenced, lasting from 2:30 until 5:30. A dress parade immediately followed. Supper was served at 6:30, roll call ..."
"...During the month of May, the Confederacy’s capital moved from Montgomery to Richmond, and another southern state, North Carolina, seceded. Hiram learned that the reason for his regiment’s relocation was because Union forces had moved into Virginia and seized Alexandria, which was nearly seventy miles away. Although the situation seemed to be worsening, strangely enough, visitors from Huntsville steadily arrived to see their boys, bringing gifts and letters. Citizens from home temporarily took their own places in ..."
"...Word reached the troops that on May 24, a New York infantry regiment led by Colonel Elmer Ellsworth arrived in Alexandria. A large Southern flag had been displayed from the Marshall House Hotel, which was visible from Washington. The colonel attempted to remove it himself, but was shot in the chest with a double-barrel shotgun by the proprietor of the hotel, James ..."
"...It wasn’t long before the Yankees came into view: their appearance seemed surreal. The men of the 4th Alabama were confronted with the entire advancing Union Army. As they neared, the regiments on either side of the North Alabamians fell away. Colonel Jones ordered his men to hold fast their line of defense while he had them march up a hill to a low fence surrounding a cornfield. ..."
106.
"... their line of defense while he had them march up a hill to a low fence surrounding a cornfield. General Bee galloped over to the regiment and commanded them by calling out, “Up, Alabamians!” The men rushed over the fence and advanced at a double quick to the top of the hill. Colonel Jones ..."
"...After two hours of quiet, the Yankees resumed their assault, and the Confederates fought off several Union advances. Men in colorful garb fashioned after French Algerian Zouaves attacked first, but were driven back. Then came, one at a time, three other regiments, but all eventually broke and ran. Their uniforms caused confusion, for men on either side were dressed in both blue and gray, including Colonel Jones, who wore the blue uniform he had donned while previously serving in the U.S. Army. ..."
"...The men spied two unknown regiments clad in gray, approaching in a line on their right. Assuming they were Confederates, the Alabamians signaled by raising their hands to their caps while giving the password, “our homes,” and the unknown regiment signaled back by mirroring the action. Law ordered his soldiers to form a line behind ..."
"...The 4th Alabama was finally flanked. As the regiment was commanded to retire, Old Battalion was hit in the leg, forcing Colonel Jones to dismount. In a hail of bullets, he too was hit in both thighs, and crumbled to the ground with a broken left leg. Law immediately took command, managing to retire his troops, but was ..."
118.
"... and your native land.” He then asked for volunteers to retrieve Jones, but was convinced by another captain that the effort was futile. At a loss, the regiment awaited orders, watching survivors from other divisions scatter or huddle together in a nearby ravine. Generals Johnston and ..."
122.
"... been left on the battlefield,” came a response. Another man asked the general to place the regiment in position, to which Johnston replied that he would, once he analyzed the situation, and the generals rode off. It was now two o’clock. All of a sudden, General Bee rode up on ..."
132.
"... he stands like a stone wall! Rally behind the Virginians!” As the regiment moved left, an artillery battery cut through their ranks. Bee and his army veered right, while the rest of the regiment moved forward into the woods. Mayhem prevailed. The men were unable to distinguish friend from ..."
"...foe. Forced to fall back, they retired in a hurricane of bullets to await further orders. Suddenly, James Alexander fell, a bullet piercing his abdomen, and sending his entrails splattering. Bud witnessed the young man’s terrible injury, but was unable to assist. Although in shock, he retreated with his regiment in a tornado of chaos. He and Hiram trailed behind, and as they retreated, Hiram overheard Bee address Jackson. ..."
"...Later in the day, President Davis rode at a gallop past the regiment on his way to the front. At sundown, the men found their way back, and rested in their bivouac, reflecting on the day’s events. They felt miserable about their performance, because they had turned their backs to the Yankees and retreated. The camp died down, with only the sounds ..."
"...Soldiers from other regiments wandered into camp, describing the turmoil that had swirled around them. Brigadier General J. E. B. Stuart, Confederate cavalry commander, had hurled his cavaliers into the New York Zouaves, and as the Yankees retreated, all hell broke loose. Civilians from Washington City had driven over to witness the battle, ..."

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Chapter 4: Chapter Four
5.
"... sinking in. Caroline smiled. “No, thankfully not.” Ben returned the smile. “Right glad to hear it.” He handed her a newspaper. “The editor of this paper, Mr. William Figures, has a son who’s with your husband’s regiment.” “Oh?” she replied cordially. “He’s all right, ..."
"...“No, Ma. I quit doin’ that.” He handed her the fish. Noticing the newspaper lying on the table, he gazed at the front page. “Governor Moore gave a speech about Pa’s regiment!” he exclaimed, and read on. “It says here that he praises the accomplishments of the 4th Alabama for chasin’ off four regiments of Yankees. And in return, the state legislature has given its official thanks and distinction for their remarkable display of cohesion and fightin’ ability. They’re heroes!” He ..."
"...along Big Spring Branch, where hundreds of others were drilling. Behind the soldiers, rows of horse stables lined the edge of the woods. David and Jake slid off Joe Boy, tied him to a shrub, and stealthily stole to the top of an incline. They looked down upon the regiment, watching as the group they had followed fell in, took their place among the others, and obeyed their commander’s orders to “About face.” The men moved in unison, responding to each call the officer made. He hollered, “Attention,” and they stood erect in anticipation of his next command. The ..."
81.
"... agreed with a grin. “Welcome to Camp Jones, named after Colonel Jones. Y’all ever heard of him?” “I have,” David volunteered. “He’s the commander of my pa’s regiment.” “Oh! So your pa is off fightin’ the Yankees!” “Yessir.” “Y’all considerin’ jinin’ ..."
95.
"... the heat. Jake and David looked over to where the soldier directed. “Yeah?” asked Jake. “That’s First Lieutenant Joseph Wheeler. He’s formin’ this here regiment, the nineteenth Alabama.” “Oh,” David replied in awe. They stood watching for a moment. The men below marched in ..."
155.
"... On October 7, state leaders announced that Alabama had supplied twenty-seven thousand troops to the Confederacy thus far. This included sixty infantry regiments, thirteen cavalry regiments, six battalions, and twenty batteries. The war was ramping up, that much was certain. Caroline ..."

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Chapter 6: Chapter Six
"...The weather had been typical, although Hiram, Bud, and the rest of their regiment thought differently, since they were unaccustomed to Virginia’s snowy winters. General Joe Johnston’s Army of Northern Virginia established their winter quarters, and the camp sprawled from Fredericksburg southwest into the Shenandoah Valley, with the 4th Alabama constructing their site near Manassas Junction at Dumfries. ..."
"...In early spring, some officers and reenlisted men were sent home for sixty days to secure recruits. By March, they had returned, and the regiment was once again replete of its losses. Meanwhile, some of the remaining Alabamians suffered from another epidemic, yellow jaundice, for which the common treatment was enemas. ..."
"...Hiram’s regiment, which was camped at Yorktown, reorganized on April 21, due to the fact that the one-year commitment many soldiers gave upon their enlistment expired. William Rivers, whose cousin, James Alexander, had been killed at Manassas, opted to resign his position. He was so heartbroken over the loss of his ..."

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Chapter 7: Chapter Seven
"...McClellan’s army occupied Yorktown. Hiram’s regiment was bivouacked among George Washington’s old breastworks, which were still plainly visible. Many expressed pride in fighting for their liberty, just as the patriots of the Revolution had done. Because they were without utensils, the men resorted to cooking “Indian style” by placing dough on peeled hickory bark and ..."
"...The following morning, they learned that a regiment of Union soldiers had gotten ahead of them in an attempt to cut them off. General Whiting, the brigade commander, galloped past them on his steed, his hands clasped and his face raised to the sky in prayer while he rode to the front. Later on in the day, ..."
"...On the evening of May 30, Hiram’s regiment was ordered to march a few miles east of Richmond, where they bivouacked in a grove of oak trees. The men of Company G, the Marion Light Infantry, stacked their guns against one of the oaks, and went to sleep beneath it. During the night, a terrible electrical storm ..."
"...Early the following morning, the Alabamians traveled eight miles to the beat of their drums toward Seven Pines and their foe. The Stars and Bars, St. Andrews Cross, the regimental colors, and the Bonnie Blue Flag all flew gallantly above the advancing Confederates. Once they arrived, they saw that the Union army had been driven out, for all that remained were their empty tents. Throughout the course of the day, the 4th was maneuvered to different locations, but still ..."
"...As soon as the men took their position, the Union soldiers opened fire. The Alabamians were forced to endure an unmerciful bombardment, since no other regiment appeared to support them. While they lay in wait, tolerating the shelling, General Johnston slowly rode up to them. He sat upon his mount, staring off at the advancing Union army. Suddenly, a piece of shell struck him in the shoulder, knocking him off his horse. As rapidly as ..."
"...Because the position of the regiment was on open ground, it moved at twilight toward the cover of trees and the abandoned Yankee camp, but before the men reached their refuge, another shell exploded in their midst, killing several. Agonized screams pierced the air, and the survivors yelled and cursed as they fled. Union soldiers ..."
168.
"... want to do our part by preservin’ the glorious Union!” “Is your brother, Lemuel, a Yankee, too?” David asked. Leering at them, Owen said, “He’s in my regiment.” “Well, we can’t wait to be Yankees, either!” Jake interjected cheerfully. Owen seemed convinced. “All ..."

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Chapter 8: Chapter Eight
"...On June 17, General Lee sent the 4th Alabama and Hood’s Texans to the Shenandoah Valley to support Stonewall Jackson, while Union General McDowell was ordered to defend Washington against Jackson’s advance. Hiram’s regiment marched 150 miles, and was allowed to rest for only one day during the journey. Eight days later, the men bivouacked near Ashland, twelve miles from Richmond. Circling around McClellan’s army, they were now behind it. The following morning, General Lee pursued the fleeing Federals. ..."
"...They advanced across. The stench of smoke and sulfur rose up to meet them as they fell victim to the waiting Union artillery and small guns. The roar was nearly deafening, and several men fell screaming to their deaths while the regiment progressed. Smoke was so thick and suffocating that the Rebels choked and coughed. They could barely see ten feet in front of them, but they knew they had to persevere. The Alabamians advanced to find a brigade of A. P. Hill’s Virginians lying in front of the enemy’s lines. ..."
"...Company D received admiration for his ability to capture twenty-three men and an officer. In the excitement of battle, he had unintentionally jumped into a trench filled with Federals, so he shot one and took the rest prisoner. Among the Yankees captured by the Confederates was Colonel McLemore’s old regiment, the 8th U.S. Infantry, which he had resigned from at the onset of the war. ..."
"...Union sympathizers arrived in Decatur and made it their mission to report Rebels who were hiding in the hills. Union Colonel Abel Streight decided to pursue the offenders, so he took a regiment of infantry and one company of cavalry into the mountains to hunt them down. The cavalry was attacked by Confederate scouts, so they returned to Decatur, but the infantry was successful in capturing the fugitives, and forced them to enlist with the 1st Alabama Cavalry. On July 10, they ..."
"...The day progressed in much the same way as the preceding one, and again at 4:00 p.m., the skirmishing amplified to heavy fighting, which involved troops close to the Alabamians. Because the regiment was located on an elevation, they were able to see the entire battle play out before them in panoramic view. ..."

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Chapter 9: Chapter Nine
"...and even though that wasn’t the case, their sentiments were equally divided. Hiram overheard a few spectators, who were observing their march from open second-story windows, comment on how they couldn’t distinguish the generals from the enlisted men, because they were all in filthy tatters. General Lee ordered his regimental bands to play “Maryland, My Maryland.” His men cheered while they marched through, but they were later disappointed, for they were unable to successfully recruit enough soldiers to replenish their depleted ranks. ..."
"...That evening, the regiment was ordered to position itself on the Sharpsburg and Hagerstown Pike, about a mile from Sharpsburg near the Dunker Church, which was a simple, small, whitewashed, one-story structure sans steeple. The men learned that it was named after German Baptist immigrants, who baptized their brethren in the creek, thus ..."
"...Around nine o’clock that night, the North Alabamians were moved to outpost duty at a worm-and-hole fence, isolated from the rest of their regiment. Lieutenant Stewart directed them to draw back on their weapons in order to conserve ammunition. The men did their best to make themselves comfortable, although a drizzle had started, and the constant noise of moving caissons and artillery kept the hungry, exhausted Rebels awake. About an hour later, the ..."
29.
"... The men were too terrified to speak further. After what seemed like hours, a regiment of Georgians showed up to relieve them of their post. Learning that General Jackson had arrived on the field, the Alabamians returned to Dunker Church, partook in a few rations, and tried to sleep. ..."
"...their enemies as they drove them out. Captain Scruggs, who fell wounded, was quickly replaced by Captain Robbins. Realizing that they were at an advantage, the Rebels shot down scores of Yankees while concealing themselves in the cover of trees, fighting savagely despite their extreme hunger and fatigue. Other regiments of their brigade, the Texans, South Carolinians, and Georgians, were out in the open on their left, and suffered because of it. As dawn began to lighten the sky, Hiram noticed a Union general riding around the field on a large white horse. ..."
"...the sunny morning sky. Young men not more than eighteen, their cheeks once rosy with the blossom of vigor and manhood, lay cold and still, bathing in their own hearts’ blood. Some didn’t even look human, while others were missing heads, arms, legs, or torsos. Several members of the regiment scurried around the battlefield, placing the wounded on stretchers. The victims cried out in anguish, their blood leaking from their broken bodies like fractured wine bottles as they were carried away. Bud heard a persistent whimpering sound, so he followed it, and walked around an enormous oak tree, its ..."

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Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
65.
"... convulsions. Waiting for the spasms to cease, David winced. “What’s ailin’ you?” he asked. “The pox. My whole regiment came down with it. I reckon you heard about my brother.” “Yeah. Dreadful sorry.” Noticing tiny red spots covering Owen’s face, he backed up slightly ..."
"...With his own comrades entrenched on either side of him, Hiram and the North Alabamians observed the fighting. Burnside reignited his attack in earnest at two o’clock by shelling another regiment of Rebels, who stood their ground in a sunken road behind a stone wall. One advance after another tried in vain to break the Confederate stance, but all were unable to penetrate the line. The Yankees marched up the hill until there were so many of their dead clogging ..."
"...At the advent of dawn, shelling and skirmishing resumed. Hiram’s regiment moved out into the open, near the edge of a wood. All fell eerily quiet while they waited for the command. Noticing two captains and an adjutant nearby, Bud decided to join in on their conversation, for he was curious to hear their plan of action. As he neared, ..."
"...It had stopped raining, but bitter cold replaced it. Upon returning to camp, Bud and his comrades learned that they had lost five, with seventeen wounded. Their regiment didn’t fire a single shot. The Yankees, it was estimated, lost over nine thousand after making fourteen assaults that were all beaten back. The men heard of one brave soul, Sergeant Kirkland of South Carolina, who acquired a reputation as the “Angel of Marye’s Heights” for crossing enemy lines ..."
232.
"... After days of sleeplessness, Bud’s temper flared easily. “I’m home on furlough.” “Which regiment you with?” inquired another, whose face was hidden behind a thick amber beard. “The Fourth Alabama Infantry, but that ain’t none of your concern.” Bud stifled his anger. ..."

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