A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'secession' mean?

Find out what secession means. Secession is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

secession

(pronounced si-sesh-uhn ) Withdrawal from the United States Federal government. Eleven Southern states seceded by voting to separate from the Union because they felt persecuted and believed it was legal. Unionists, however, saw it as rebellion.

The term "secession" is used in my book, A Beautiful Glittering Lie, as follows:

(Pages 18-19)
Ben Johnson, the shopkeeper, put his two cents-worth in by informing the crowd, while he dusted, that during the Secession Convention in February, the Republic of Alabama Flag was severely damaged from a storm, so it was moved to the Governor’s office, and he hoped it wasn’t a bad omen. Because the flag had flown just once, he had only seen a drawing of it in a local publication: the Goddess of Liberty was on one side, holding an unsheathed sword in her right hand and a flag with one star in the other. The words “Independent Now and Forever” were arched above her head. On the other side was a cotton plant with a coiled rattlesnake. Beneath the plant, in Latin words, it read, “Noli Me Tangere,” or “Touch Me Not.”

(Page 19)
“I’m supportin’ the state, and the majority has voted for secession, so it’s our duty to protect her!” ranted Mr. Copeland. David had been friends with his daughter, Callie, ever since they started school together nine years ago.

(Pages 61-62)
Evander McIvor Law of Florence was unanimously chosen as lieutenant colonel on the first ballot. Law was considered an accomplished officer, despite his lack of combat experience and field command. He was of slight build, with a goatee covering his 26-year-old face, concealing his youthful appearance. On the second ballot, Charles Lewis Scott was elected major. He had been a two-term congressman from California at the onset of the war, at which time he returned to Alabama to defend his native state. Edward Dorr Tracy, a Georgia-born lawyer, was elected as captain for the North Alabamians, the company he had created. Tracy’s law partner, David C. Humphreys, was considered to be a Douglas Democrat who had staunchly opposed secession, but once the war became certain, he enlisted in his colleague’s company as a private. He was an experienced military man, having previously served as a militia colonel.

(Page 70)
Expelling a sigh, Hiram nodded. “He calls himself a cooperationist instead of a secessionist, but I reckon you’re right. He ain’t jinin’ up to defend us.”

(Page 169)
“It’s ironic, too,” Mr. Powell interjected, “because Athens flew the stars and stripes longer than the rest of the state in protest for not havin’ secession submitted to the popular vote. They wanted to stay with the Union, and now they’re bein’ attacked by it.”

Search result for 'secession' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 1: Chapter One
"...secessionon, the shopkeeper, put his two cents-worth in by informing the crowd, while he dusted, that during the secession Convention in February, the Republic of Alabama flag was severely damaged by a storm, so it was moved to the governor’s office, and he hoped it wasn’t a bad omen. Because ..."
148.
"... and privileges?” “I’m supportin’ the state, and the majority has voted for secession, so it’s our duty to protect her!” ranted Mr. Copeland. David had been friends with his daughter, Callie, ever since they started school together nine years ago. “Now that there’s a call ..."

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Chapter 3: Chapter Three
"...war, at which time he returned to Alabama to defend his native state. Edward Dorr Tracy, a Georgia-born lawyer, was elected as captain for the North Alabamians, the company he had created. Tracy’s law partner, David C. Humphreys, was considered to be a Douglas Democrat who had staunchly opposed secession, but once the war became certain, he enlisted in his colleague’s company as a private. He was an experienced military man, having previously served as a militia colonel. ..."
83.
"... surprised,” retorted Bud. “He’s jist another Tory.” Expelling a sigh, Hiram nodded. “He calls himself a cooperationist instead of a secessionist, but I reckon you’re right. He ain’t jinin’ up to defend us.” Deeply saddened that his childhood friend had betrayed him, Hiram ..."

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Chapter 7: Chapter Seven
14.
"... “It’s ironic, too,” Mr. Powell interjected, “because Athens flew the stars and stripes longer than the rest of the state in protest for not havin’ secession submitted to the popular vote. They wanted to stay in the Union, and now they’re bein’ attacked by it.” “The ..."

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Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
153.
"... writhing in agony. Another Yankee fired at Bud, who flinched as the bullet whizzed by his cheek. “Surrender now, seceshes!” one of the Federals commanded, using a slang term for secessionists. Before Bud could react, hot fire exploded behind him, and the Yankees fell back into the woods. He ..."

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