A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'shot' mean?

Find out what shot means. Shot is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

shot

A round, solid projectile, which is shot from a cannon. In my novel, A Beautiful Glittering Lie, the term "shot" is referred to as such:

(Page 80)
The veterans continued pouring shot and shell into their foe, some falling randomly to the ground as they were hit. He heard a gun go off behind him, and a man down the line from him fell dead. A group of soldiers behind him started yelling, creating a commotion.

(Page 85)
The men were instructed to advance toward their enemy. They audaciously marched across an open field in front of the church, in perfect alignment, while a hailstorm of minié balls rained down on them. Because it was still too dark to see, the men could hardly determine who was shot, except for random screams that came across the field both near and far, and they were unable to distinguish between blue and gray uniforms. Solid shot cracked into skulls and bones, which sounded like breaking eggshells.

(Pages 98-99)
They came up from the town as though on parade, and appeared to be unstoppable, like they would keep going over and through the Confederate line. With grape, shell, and shot, the Rebel guns immediately began their deadly work, pouring a storm of lead into the advancing foe, and they blew holes into the dark, solid columns, which were filled in like water rushing around a fractured dam. The thunderous salvos of cannonade shook the ground, retorted by the Yankees’ counter-barrage. The men in gray let loose a bloodcurdling Rebel yell and fired a storm of lead canister into the faces of their enemies as they approached, which was enough to send the bluecoats reeling. They stumbled, taking cover behind the bank. A line of colorful Zouaves passed them, but they could not withstand the Rebel onslaught either. They fell back in confusion.

(Page 100)
Shells started flying at them, whistling and bursting all around. While they ran, shot and canister hit the ground, sending a torrent of dirt in their faces, and creating huge craters that they frantically zigzagged to avoid. The Confederates dashed up the hill, escaping the turmoil. Bud glanced back over his shoulder. He saw a shell fly straight at Hiram. It hit him. Hiram’s body exploded like a ripe tomato.

Search result for 'shot' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 1: Chapter One
90.
"... will become their worst enemies in war.” The congregation reveled in his proclamation. Someone near the rear shot off a pistol, startling the horses. David saw Bud jump at the noise. Mr. Davis waved to the crowd before disappearing into his boxcar. Looking at each other, Jake and David ..."
"...Mr. Foreman looked up from the newspaper he had draped over the countertop. “It says here that on the twenty-seventh of last month, Russian troops in Warsaw shot five people who were protestin’ Poland’s rule.” He shook his head slowly. “It’s as though the whole world is ablaze with violence.” ..."
233.
"... fight, someone has to stay here and protect the womenfolk. You’re the man of the house now.” “I don’t have a gun.” “I’m leavin’ you with the shotgun.” “What are you fixin’ to take?” “My ole flintlock. It shoots straight enough to hit a few Yankees.” The grin on his ..."

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Chapter 3: Chapter Three
"...Word reached the troops that on May 24, a New York infantry regiment led by Colonel Elmer Ellsworth arrived in Alexandria. A large Southern flag had been displayed from the Marshall House Hotel, which was visible from Washington. The colonel attempted to remove it himself, but was shot in the chest with a double-barrel shotgun by the proprietor of the hotel, James W. Jackson, who in return was shot and bayoneted to death. Few members of the 4th Alabama expressed remorse for the loss of Ellsworth, especially since he had been a close friend of President Lincoln. ..."
"...password, “our homes,” and the unknown regiment signaled back by mirroring the action. Law ordered his soldiers to form a line behind the new arrivals. As soon as the 4th unfurled their flags, they were quickly surprised when the culprits turned and opened fire on them. Several men were shot, screaming in agony while the deceivers perpetrated their lines. Others reacted by bursting into hysterical laughter, contrary to what the situation demanded. ..."
"...of bullets, he too was hit in both thighs, and crumbled to the ground with a broken left leg. Law immediately took command, managing to retire his troops, but was compelled to leave Jones on the field because Union soldiers had forded Bull Run River. Major Scott went down, shot through the leg. Law fell next, his arm broken by a Yankee’s bullet, and was quickly taken from the field. The remaining Alabamians now had no one to guide them. They stood in mass confusion while men writhed around them on the ground, bloody and dying. Smoke and thunder ..."

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Chapter 4: Chapter Four
"...spoke to the audience of nearly twenty-five thousand. Once the service ended, the procession continued on to the city cemetery, where the celebrated colonel was laid to rest beside his deceased wife, fulfilling a request he had expressed as a premonition of his death. A wailing dirge played, three shots were fired by a newly formed company, the Huntsville Greys, the grave was filled up, and the congregation dispersed. ..."

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Chapter 5: Chapter Five
"...look at him questioningly, he elaborated. “He proposed a bill that would entitle each new state to vote if it wanted slavery, and for the plantation owners to be compensated for their slaves, should their niggers be set free. But ole ‘Rail Splitter’ Lincoln and his cronies in Congress shot down his bill. Now the poor senator has one son fightin’ for the North, and the other one fightin’ for the South.” ..."

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Chapter 6: Chapter Six
135.
"... declared Jake, shaking his head in disgust. “The Yankees decided that they’re tired of dealin’ with the niggers, so they merely shoot them when they approach,” she added. “They’ve shot several of the poor souls already.” David and Jake looked at each other and frowned, for ..."

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Chapter 7: Chapter Seven
"...prompting some of the men to comment on how General Whiting’s prayers had been answered. One of the North Alabamians, Orderly Sergeant Hartley, and a private from Company A, were sent out as scouts later that evening, but when morning came, only the private returned. Sergeant Hartley had been shot, and the private brought back his bullet-pierced roll book to prove it. Hiram and the rest of Company I once again felt sorrow, for although Hartley had been from Connecticut, he was well liked, and a true Confederate patriot. ..."
60.
"... that they might start a family together. Jake laughed. “That’s right. Isabelle and Percy.” He motioned for David to follow him into the barn and out of earshot. “What do you say we ride up to Huntsville and see what’s been goin’ on?” David shook his head. “I don’t know, ..."

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Chapter 8: Chapter Eight
"...lost twenty-three, including Captain Armistead and Captain Price, and 109 were either wounded or missing. Jim Harrison of Company D received admiration for his ability to capture twenty-three men and an officer. In the excitement of battle, he had unintentionally jumped into a trench filled with Federals, so he shot one and took the rest prisoner. Among the Yankees captured by the Confederates was Colonel McLemore’s old regiment, the 8th U.S. Infantry, which he had resigned from at the onset of the war. ..."
"...came out of her bedroom. Walking across the dining room and through the front room, she peered out the window. Two riders approached up the lane. It was still too dark for her to make out who they were. She rushed over to the gun rack, took down the shotgun, and walked out the front door to the porch. As the riders neared, she was able to make out their identities. ..."
"...arrow whisked through the air, lodging in one of the horses’ flanks. The chestnut reared in surprise, screaming with pain. Both horses panicked, so that their riders could barely control them. The first soldier saw what direction the arrows were coming from. He drew his pistol and fired a shot into the nearby trees, but it was still too dark to make anything out in the shadows. Before he could react, an arrow flew into the arm he was holding up. He cried out, dropping his weapon. ..."
55.
"... time if they do.” Josie and Rena came out the front door. “Ma?” Josie asked sleepily. “What’s goin’ on?” “We thought we heard a gunshot,” said Rena. “We had some early mornin’ visitors,” Caroline replied, aggravated. “Yeah, unwelcome ones,” added David. “What ..."
"...The men were forced to tolerate heavy artillery fire and skirmishing until 4:00 p.m., when the fighting started in earnest. Hiram knelt to load his musket, stood, and fired on command with his comrades, who were positioned in a line. The veterans continued pouring shot and shell into their foe, some falling randomly to the ground as they were hit. He heard a gun go off behind him, and a man down the line from him fell dead. A group of soldiers behind him started yelling, creating a commotion. ..."
99.
"... of soldiers behind him started yelling, creating a commotion. One of them ran up to the deceased man. Realizing that it was his comrade who had been hit by friendly fire, the soldier cried, “Damn it, Martin! You shot him!” Hiram slowly shook his head in anguish while the body was carried ..."
"...Alabama continued to observe until they were called upon, along with General Longstreet’s men, to support Jackson. They rushed to his rescue, and the Yankees were finally forced to retreat, leaving their dead and dying on the field. All the while, artillery from both sides continued firing canister and grapeshot. Billowing smoke hung over the infantrymen as opposing sides shot at each other. Like the previous day, the Confederates again drove their enemies, until nightfall hindered them. ..."

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Chapter 9: Chapter Nine
11.
"... with a shrug, repeating what he had heard other men in the ranks proclaim. “Yeah, but it’s the exact opposite case for some fellers,” Bud added sarcastically, glancing at Dozier, who he knew was out of earshot. The men made their way through unfamiliar terrain, weighed down with ..."
"...The men were instructed to advance toward their enemy. They audaciously marched across an open field in front of the church, in perfect alignment, while a hailstorm of minié balls rained down on them. Because it was still too dark to see, the men could hardly determine who was shot, except for random screams that came across the field both near and far, and they were unable to distinguish between blue and gray uniforms. Solid shot cracked into skulls and bones, which sounded like breaking eggshells. ..."
"...The Confederates advanced into the trees, skirmishing with their enemies as they drove them out. Captain Scruggs, who fell wounded, was quickly replaced by Captain Robbins. Realizing that they were at an advantage, the Rebels shot down scores of Yankees while concealing themselves in the cover of trees, fighting savagely despite their extreme hunger and fatigue. Other regiments of their brigade, the Texans, South Carolinians, and Georgians, were out in the open on their left, and suffered because of it. As dawn began to lighten ..."
103.
"... him.” The cheerful man shuffled into the house. David followed, waited in the parlor for Jake to appear, and once he did, made sure Percy was out of earshot before asking, “Did you hear about that proclamation ole Abe Lincoln made?” “Sure did,” his best friend responded. Jake led ..."
140.
"... the subject. “Did you hear about Lemuel Ridgeway?” he asked quietly while they heaped victuals onto their plates. “He died!” “He did? Was he shot?” “No. He got sick.” David hesitated, and said, “I only wish it was his brother instead.” Jake sniggered. “You don’t mean ..."

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Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
"...A few days later, David learned that Owen had indeed returned to Morgan County, so devising a plan, he summoned his courage. The pistol that the Union officer had dropped when he shot him with an arrow was stashed in Caroline’s top dresser drawer, but he knew where to find it. Attempting to be inconspicuous, he tucked it under the waistband of his trousers, and set off to confront his adversary. After riding for almost an hour, he recognized the small shotgun ..."
"...At dawn on December 11, the Rebels’ heavy artillery report sounded the alarm: two shots fired in quick succession signaled the Union army’s advance across the river. The 4th fell out and took their position in line. They heard heavy firing down in the town and learned that McLaws’ Division was shooting at the Yankees to prevent them from constructing pontoon bridges. ..."
"...They came up from the town as though on parade, and appeared to be unstoppable, like they would keep going over and through the Confederate line. With grape, shell, and shot, the Rebel guns immediately began their deadly work, pouring a storm of lead into the advancing foe, and they blew holes into the dark, solid columns, which were filled in like water rushing around a fractured dam. The thunderous salvos of cannonade shook the ground, retorted by the Yankees’ ..."
"...officers talkin’. One was ours, and one was theirs. As they was discussin’ the matters at hand, along comes ole Stonewall hisself, ridin’ right past them. Well, the Yankee officer says, ‘Who’s that?’ And our officer says, ‘Stonewall Jackson. Had you known who it was, no doubt you would’ve shot him.’ ‘Oh, no,’ says the Yankee officer. ‘I’m in favor of keepin’ him. We may, after whippin’ you, need him!’” ..."
156.
"... his voice riddled with panic. Looking up at him with pain and confusion in his eyes, Hiram tried to hold his hand over the wound. Bud watched in horror as blood flowed over his hand, covering it in crimson, and saw that he had been shot through the neck. The shelling had resumed. Several ..."
"...Shells started flying at them, whistling and bursting all around. While they ran, shot and canister hit the ground, sending a torrent of dirt in their faces, and creating huge craters that they frantically zigzagged to avoid. The Confederates dashed up the hill, escaping the turmoil. Bud glanced back over his shoulder. He saw a shell fly straight at Hiram. It hit him. ..."
"...It had stopped raining, but bitter cold replaced it. Upon returning to camp, Bud and his comrades learned that they had lost five, with seventeen wounded. Their regiment didn’t fire a single shot. The Yankees, it was estimated, lost over nine thousand after making fourteen assaults that were all beaten back. The men heard of one brave soul, Sergeant Kirkland of South Carolina, who acquired a reputation as the “Angel of Marye’s Heights” for crossing enemy lines and benevolently tending to the ..."

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