A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'slave' mean?

Find out what slave means. Slave is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

slave

A state of bondage in which primarily black people were kept on plantations and owned by others who were usually white. Slaves were brought over from Africa during American colonization and forced to work for their owners. At the time of the Civil War, slave trading, or transporting slaves from Africa, had been outlawed, but slave ownership was still legal in Southern states and some Northern states as well. In my novel, A Beautiful Glittering Lie, the term "slave" is used as follows:

(Page 10)
For the rest of the afternoon and into the evening, the family enjoyed each other’s company. Mr. Kimball apologized that his wife couldn’t be there, for she was required to stay home, due to a sprained ankle. His faithful slaves, Percy and Isabelle, were looking after her. They were newlyweds, and seemed happy to oblige. Therefore, Mr. Kimball brought his son down to see Jake’s sister and her husband, who had moved to Montgomery two years ago. Jake insisted that his best friend come along, and when asked, David requested the presence of his own father, too. Hiram then invited Bud, knowing that if war broke out, he would want to be one of the first to know.

(Page 22)
He smiled assuredly at the slave before entering the house. While he stood waiting, he could hear Isabelle speaking upstairs, announcing his arrival. Another recognizable voice answered.

(Page 23)
“Oh, you know. That Percy’s too old for Miss Isabelle, and they should be kept chained up like all slaves.”

(Page 23)
“What does he know about it? He don’t have any slaves.”

(Page 39)
Although he knew he was going against his mother’s wishes, David went out of his way to learn what was happening in Virginia, and he read every detail he could find about the battle. He found out that on July 27, General McClellan was appointed to Commander of the Department of the Potomac, replacing General McDowell, who had failed at the battle, which the Northerners were calling Bull Run and the Rebels were referring to as Manassas. A few days later, on August 6, the Confiscation Act was passed, which permitted the seizure of all property that was being used for insurrection, including slaves. It stripped the slave owners of their property rights, but didn’t actually free the slaves, so they were considered property of the U.S. government.

(Page 39)
On a sultry afternoon two weeks later, he and Jake decided to go swimming in a pond near Jake’s. Returning to the house, they treaded barefoot along a dirt path, passing by the slaves’ shanty, and overheard Percy speaking to Isabelle in a hushed tone. Deciding to eavesdrop, they crept to the open window as close as they dared to without being detected.

(Page 40)
They unhitched Joe Boy, and rode the large white Percheron bareback down the thoroughfare. Traveling along Adams Street, they took in the beautiful Italianate homes, headed back up Franklin Street, observing the enormous Classical revival-style mansions, and wondered what life inside them was like, living in the lap of luxury within their walls. Although Jake’s family had slaves, they were treated more like family than servants, and the thought of having someone obey their every command like genies was an inconceivable concept. Riding in a square, they noticed that very few people were outdoors, because of the heat.

(Page 48)
“Crittenden, from Kentucky. My kinfolk live up that way, and told me all about it.” He paused, but hearing no objection, continued. “The good senator tried his darnedest to make those humbugs up in Washin’ton come to their senses.” Seeing David look at him questioningly, he elaborated. “He proposed a bill that would entitle each new state to vote if it wanted slavery, and for the plantation owners to be compensated for their slaves, should their niggers be set free. But ole ‘Rail Splitter’ Lincoln and his cronies in Congress shot down his bill. Now the poor senator has one son fightin’ for the North, and the other one fightin’ for the South.”

(Page 50)
Once he had filled his plate, he walked across the kitchen, sat at the table, and began eating. Soon, several guests joined him, and struck up a conversation about his father. Isabelle scurried about to accommodate the partygoers, as did the Copelands’ five slaves, and a few others that neighbors had brought along to help support them.

(Page 50)
“My ma says that it’s right fittin’ and all. She says that Twilight symbolizes the transitions we’ve all been goin’ through—the new Confederacy and two new presidents, talk of freein’ the slaves, and the country splittin’ in two. It’s like the dawnin’ of a new day.”

(Page 55)
Most of the dwellings consisted of tents with chimneys, but Hiram and Bud, as well as a few other men, had cabins, which were made by slave labor from logs, earth, and cracker barrels. Makeshift stoves, created from bricks and fieldstone, occupied the centers. Bud and Hiram named their humble abode, “The Jameson Hotel,” after an elaborate hotel in Decatur, and hung a sign above the door with their cabin’s chosen name painted on it. Other comrades named their cabins “Home Sweet Home,” “The Madison Boarding House,” and the “Soljers Rest.”

(Page 59)
Some of the soldiers managed to secure newspapers, which reported that Lincoln had been pressured to relieve Grant of his duties at Shiloh. The president was quoted as saying, “I can’t spare this man; he fights.” Therefore, Unconditional Surrender Grant still remained in command, and he won the battle, as Lincoln predicted. The president also signed into effect the abolition of slavery in the Yankee nation’s capital.

(Page 62)
“They’ve moved into the train depot, the Female Seminary, and the Green Academy for boys,” Emily went on. “They’ve stolen and robbed from anyone they can, and they go out of their way to frighten us. They even steal from the poor niggers, who are learnin’ to hate those thievin’ Yankees as much as our Southern brethren do. The freed slaves come to the soldiers, who jist tear up their freedom papers, whip them, and send them back home.”

(Page 67)
Inexplicably, Union forces backed off, so the Rebels were able to continue on unmolested until they reached the outskirts of Richmond. They camped there for three weeks. During that time, the men managed to obtain news that on May 15, the CSS Alabama had been launched from England, and five days later, the Homestead Act was signed into law. Before the war, Southern states had opposed the act because of its anti-slavery sentiment, but now there were no Southern states represented in Congress to contest it. The act allowed settlers to occupy, improve, and farm 160-acre parcels of land in the Western territories for five years, but without the use of slaves. If, after that time, the farmers were successful in establishing a farmstead, the land was theirs to keep.

(Page 69)
“Sure could go for a cup of coffee with this,” David remarked while he munched on a sandwich. Changing the subject, he said, “I heard at Ben Johnson’s that the Yankee Congress banned slavery in the Western territories. The slave owners ain’t gettin’ paid, either. They have to give up their slaves, and the government won’t compensate them.”

(Page 69)
“Reckon that’s so,” David agreed. “I heard England paid its slave owners for their slaves before they were all set free.”

(Page 69)
They squatted behind a stack of barrels, waiting for several soldiers to pass. The guards talked raucously with German accents. A few freed slaves followed them, keeping a short distance behind. They were dressed in tattered clothing, and had no shoes on their feet. One of the Negroes glanced over. Noticing the two boys peering out from behind the barrels, he put his index finger to his lips, chuckled, and went on.

(Page 76)
Colonel Turchin’s men had been having a field day in Athens. Aside from their uncontrolled outrages against the citizens, the Yankees singled out a slave named Matthew Gray. They forced Gray and a captured Confederate soldier to mount a mule, and after tying their feet together under the animal, they drove the mule into the Tennessee River. Fortunately for the victims, the mule swam to the other side, and the two men managed to free themselves instead of drowning, as was the intention. The townsfolk were ecstatic when Turchin, as well as his superior, General Mitchel, was finally removed from command.

(Page 79)
“Reckon so. I was also told that five hundred freed slaves were sent up north by train to Nashville,” Mr. Skidmore went on.

(Page 79)
“It’s my understandin’ that the Yankees don’t want to fight for slavery. Most could care less,” Mr. Garrison informed the men. “If it comes down to that, they’ll quit and go home.”

(Page 79)
David stood silently listening, and thought of Percy, surprising himself by feeling a twinge of pity. No one seemed to want the blacks, North or South. How the slaves could ever be freed remained a mystery to him, because even if they were, they wouldn’t have anyplace to go.

(Page 88)
Two days later, on September 22, Abraham Lincoln announced his Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, freeing slaves in Confederate states, but not in Union or neutral states. No blacks were allowed into Lincoln’s home state of Illinois, and the president didn’t contest it. The Rebels thought him a hypocrite, since he was freeing slaves he had no control over, but the ones he had the power to liberate remained enslaved. Eight days later, the men learned that their beloved commander, Colonel McLemore, had died after a prolonged decline. The next day, they moved their camp to a location between Bunker Hill and Winchester, where they remained until the latter part of October, living on captured provisions and food they obtained from local farmers.

(Page 88)
On October 8, the Battle of Perryville took place, which was Kentucky’s only major battle thus far, between Union General Buell and Confederate General Braxton Bragg. Because the Republicans thought Buell was proslavery for wanting to protect Southerners’ property, he was relieved of his command. On October 9, General Longstreet was promoted to lieutenant general. A day later, so was General Jackson, and on that same day, General Stuart began his raid into Pennsylvania. The troopers rode up to Chambersburg, where they helped themselves to fresh horses and newly harvested fodder. They continued on around the Union army and returned to Virginia, completing Stuart’s second ride around McClellan.

(Page 88)
David learned of Lincoln’s proclamation to free the slaves, and was reminded of it again when he rode up to the Kimballs’ veranda. The day was warm for November 8, and on this Saturday, he had exciting plans.

(Page 90)
“Miss Callie’s slaves have run off,” David informed them.

(Page 93)
It seemed obvious by what the press was reporting that, because of Lincoln’s declared Emancipation Proclamation, the chances of Europe backing the C.S.A. were quelled. England and France had considered supporting the Southern states before the war became an issue of slavery, but now it was something they didn’t want to get involved in. The Confederacy was completely on its own.

Search result for 'slave' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 1: Chapter One
"...For the rest of the afternoon and into the evening, the family enjoyed each other’s company. Mr. Kimball apologized that his wife couldn’t be there, for she was required to stay home, due to a sprained ankle. His faithful slaves, Percy and Isabelle, were looking after her. They were newlyweds, and seemed happy to oblige. Therefore, Mr. Kimball brought his son down to see Jake’s sister and her husband, who had moved to Montgomery two years ago. Jake insisted that his best friend come along, and when asked, David ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 2: Chapter Two
84.
"... busy. Sally will be fine out here on the lawn.” He smiled assuredly at the slave before entering the house. While he stood waiting, he could hear Isabelle speaking upstairs, announcing his arrival. Another recognizable voice answered. Isabelle came downstairs, and said, “He’ll be ..."
114.
"... to the help, and I don’t take too kindly to that.” “What kind of remarks?” “Oh, you know. That Percy’s too old for Miss Isabelle, and they should be kept chained up like all slaves.” “What does he know about it? He don’t have any slaves.” “I know. He don’t even ..."
115.
"... you know. That Percy’s too old for Miss Isabelle, and they should be kept chained up like all slaves.” “What does he know about it? He don’t have any slaves.” “I know. He don’t even have a wife or young’uns, because no one will take him!” Jake chuckled, but seeing his ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 4: Chapter Four
"...General McDowell, who had failed at the battle, which the Northerners were calling Bull Run and the Rebels were referring to as Manassas. A few days later, on August 6, the Confiscation Act was passed, which permitted the seizure of all property that was being used for insurrection, including slaves. It stripped the slave owners of their property rights, but didn’t actually free the slaves, so they were considered property of the U.S. government. ..."
"...On a sultry afternoon two weeks later, he and Jake decided to go swimming in a pond near Jake’s. Returning to the house, they treaded barefoot along a dirt path, passing by the slaves’ shanty, and overheard Percy speaking to Isabelle in a hushed tone. Deciding to eavesdrop, they crept to the open window as close as they dared to without being detected. ..."
"...white Percheron bareback down the thoroughfare. Traveling along Adams Street, they took in the beautiful Italianate homes, headed back up Franklin Street, observing the enormous Classical revival-style mansions, and wondered what life inside them was like, living in the lap of luxury within their walls. Although Jake’s family had slaves, they were treated more like family than servants, and the thought of having someone obey their every command like genies was an inconceivable concept. Riding in a square, they noticed that very few people were outdoors, because of the heat. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 5: Chapter Five
"...about it.” He paused, but hearing no objection, continued. “The good senator tried his darnedest to make those humbugs up in Washin’ton come to their senses.” Seeing David look at him questioningly, he elaborated. “He proposed a bill that would entitle each new state to vote if it wanted slavery, and for the plantation owners to be compensated for their slaves, should their niggers be set free. But ole ‘Rail Splitter’ Lincoln and his cronies in Congress shot down his bill. Now the poor senator has one son fightin’ for the North, and the other one fightin’ for the ..."
"...Once he had filled his plate, he walked across the kitchen, sat at the table, and began eating. Soon, several guests joined him, and struck up a conversation about his father. Isabelle scurried about to accommodate the partygoers, as did the Copelands’ five slaves, and a few others that neighbors had brought along to help support them. ..."
99.
"... “My ma says that it’s right fittin’ and all. She says that Twilight symbolizes the transitions we’ve all been goin’ through—the new Confederacy and two new presidents, talk of freein’ the slaves, and the country splittin’ in two. It’s like the dawnin’ of a new day.” ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 6: Chapter Six
"...Most of the dwellings consisted of tents with chimneys, but Hiram and Bud, as well as a few other men, had cabins, which were made by slave labor from logs, earth, and cracker barrels. Makeshift stoves, created from bricks and fieldstone, occupied the centers. Bud and Hiram named their humble abode, “The Jameson Hotel,” after an elaborate hotel in Decatur, and hung a sign above the door with their cabin’s chosen name painted on it. Other ..."
"...had been pressured to relieve Grant of his duties at Shiloh. The president was quoted as saying, “I can’t spare this man; he fights.” Therefore, Unconditional Surrender Grant still remained in command, and he won the battle, as Lincoln predicted. The president also signed into effect the abolition of slavery in the Yankee nation’s capital. ..."
"...Green Academy for boys,” Emily went on. “They’ve stolen and robbed from anyone they can, and they go out of their way to frighten us. They even steal from the poor niggers, who are learnin’ to hate those thievin’ Yankees as much as our Southern brethren do. The freed slaves come to the soldiers, who jist tear up their freedom papers, whip them, and send them back home.” ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 7: Chapter Seven
"...camped there for three weeks. During that time, the men managed to obtain news that on May 15, the CSS Alabama had been launched from England, and five days later, the Homestead Act was signed into law. Before the war, Southern states had opposed the act because of its anti-slavery sentiment, but now there were no Southern states represented in Congress to contest it. The act allowed settlers to occupy, improve, and farm 160-acre parcels of land in the Western territories for five years, but without the use of slaves. If, after that time, the farmers were successful in ..."
"...“Sure could go for a cup of coffee with this,” David remarked while he munched on a sandwich. Changing the subject, he said, “I heard at Ben Johnson’s that the Yankee Congress banned slavery in the Western territories. The slave owners ain’t gettin’ paid, either. They have to give up their slaves, and the government won’t compensate them.” ..."
70.
"... would jist be willin’ to work with us, this war would never have happened.” “Reckon that’s so,” David agreed. “I heard England paid its slave owners for their slaves before they were all set free.” “And Pa says we have every constitutional right to secede. But ole Abe Lincoln ..."
"...They squatted behind a stack of barrels, waiting for several soldiers to pass. The guards talked raucously with German accents. A few freed slaves followed them, keeping a short distance behind. They were dressed in tattered clothing, and had no shoes on their feet. One of the Negroes glanced over. Noticing the two boys peering out from behind the barrels, he put his index finger to his lips, chuckled, and went on. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 8: Chapter Eight
"...Colonel Turchin’s men had been having a field day in Athens. Aside from their uncontrolled outrages against the citizens, the Yankees singled out a slave named Matthew Gray. They forced Gray and a captured Confederate soldier to mount a mule, and after tying their feet together under the animal, they drove the mule into the Tennessee River. Fortunately for the victims, the mule swam to the other side, and the two men managed to ..."
76.
"... even though his death was an accident.” “Is that a fact?” asked Mr. Powell. “Reckon so. I was also told that five hundred freed slaves were sent up north by train to Nashville,” Mr. Skidmore went on. “Why?” Ben asked. “To erect Yankee fortifications. From what I was told, they ..."
79.
"... more ran off and hid in the hills than went.” “It’s my understandin’ that the Yankees don’t want to fight for slavery. Most could care less,” Mr. Garrison informed the men. “If it comes down to that, they’ll quit and go home.” David stood silently listening, and thought of ..."
80.
"... home.” David stood silently listening, and thought of Percy, surprising himself by feeling a twinge of pity. No one seemed to want the blacks, North or South. How the slaves could ever be freed remained a mystery to him, because even if they were, they wouldn’t have anyplace to go. General ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 9: Chapter Nine
"...Two days later, on September 22, Abraham Lincoln announced his Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, freeing slaves in Confederate states, but not in Union or neutral states. No blacks were allowed into Lincoln’s home state of Illinois, and the president didn’t contest it. The Rebels thought him a hypocrite, since he was freeing slaves he had no control over, but the ones he had the power ..."
"...On October 8, the Battle of Perryville took place, which was Kentucky’s only major battle thus far, between Union General Buell and Confederate General Braxton Bragg. Because the Republicans thought Buell was proslavery for wanting to protect Southerners’ property, he was relieved of his command. On October 9, General Longstreet was promoted to lieutenant general. A day later, so was General Jackson, and on that same day, General Stuart began his raid into Pennsylvania. The troopers rode up to Chambersburg, where they ..."
97.
"... second ride around McClellan. David learned of Lincoln’s proclamation to free the slaves, and was reminded of it again when he rode up to the Kimballs’ veranda. The day was warm for November 8, and on this Saturday, he had exciting plans. Percy hollered at him from across the ..."
165.
"... to hear it, y’all!” she replied. The two older girls sashayed off. Josie took up a plate as Jake returned. “Miss Callie’s slaves have run off,” David informed them. “So has Miss Kitty,” Josie said somberly. “Who’s Miss Kitty?” asked Jake. “She’s my li’l’ black ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
"...It seemed obvious by what the press was reporting that, because of Lincoln’s declared Emancipation Proclamation, the chances of Europe backing the C.S.A. were quelled. England and France had considered supporting the Southern states before the war became an issue of slavery, but now it was something they didn’t want to get involved in. The Confederacy was completely on its own. ..."

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