A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'South' mean?

Find out what South means. South is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

South

Also known during the Civil War as the Confederacy, the Confederate States of America, or the Rebel states. The South incorporated all the states that seceded from the Union to form its own nation. These southern states included Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. In my novel, A Beautiful Glittering Lie, the term "South" is used as follows:

(Page 8)
David found himself swaying slightly, his feet growing tired from standing, since he had been in the same spot for over an hour, waiting for the president’s arrival. His tall, lanky frame slumped as he shoved his cold hands deep into his coat pockets. Unintentionally, his mind drifted, and he began daydreaming out of boredom, thinking about the changes that had taken place. In his opinion, it had all started two years ago and had escalated from there. First was John Brown’s raid, followed by his hanging. After that came Lincoln’s election, and now, one by one, Southern states were seceding. His own beloved Alabama had been the fourth to leave the Union only a month ago. Since then, three more states had disaffiliated. The country was splitting in two. A slight breeze blew by, causing him to shiver from the cold February chill. He forced himself to listen once again.

(Page 8)
“I reckon he’s referrin’ to the fact that Northern tyranny has suppressed us here in the South,” Jenny’s husband, Nate, said softly, giving an affirmative nod. “And if the Yankees don’t allow us to leave peaceably, we’ll take up arms if need be.”

(Page 11)
A crowd had gathered, who cheered welcomingly. The president raised his hand to say a few words, and all fell quiet. After greeting everyone, he alluded to the causes that had imposed the formation of what he called the “Southern Republic.” According to him, the South had no desire to aggravate hostilities with other sections of “this great continent.”

(Page 11)
“He wasn’t even on the ballot in ten states, all Southern, of course,” stated Hiram. “They burned him in effigy, right here in Huntsville.”

(Page 11)
“I heard about that,” responded Mr. Kimball. “They were fixin’ to call it the Free State of Nickajack, so’s it would be a neutral state betwixt the North and South.”

(Page 13)
On March 27, the Huntsville Democrat reported that a company known as the Madison Rifles was being called into service, and a few days later, so were the Huntsville Guards under Captain Egbert Jones. Alabama was preparing for war, and things were heating up. The entire Southern nation was up in arms, waiting for a reason to fight.

(Page 16)
Two quiet weeks passed. He helped his father plant rows of peas, and tilled the soil, preparing it for corn and sorghum. Their peacefulness didn’t last long, for news came that Fort Sumter, off the coast of South Carolina in Charleston Harbor, had been bombarded by Confederate forces and captured. Two days later, President Lincoln called for 75,000 volunteers, evidence that a war was now truly imminent. On April 17, Virginia seceded, and two days later, a mob of Southern sympathizers in Baltimore attacked the 6th Massachusetts Regiment while it marched through on its way to Washington. Newspapers reported that four soldiers and twenty rioters were killed.

(Page 19)
Five days later, Hiram was requested to attend a flag presentation with the rest of the newly enlisted North Alabamians, Company I. The Southern Advocate described the festivities that had transpired the evening before, when the Huntsville Guards were presented with their flag, which rivaled that of another new company, the Madison Rifles. According to the newspaper article, Miss Sallie McKie presented the silk flag to Lieutenant Gus Mastin, who in return gave a “strong, manly, and striking address, which was in good taste and well received.”

(Page 19)
After the banquet, a ceremony commenced, beginning with a patriotic oration given by one of the officers. A banner sewn by the Ladies Aid Society in Huntsville was presented to the new company by Miss Carrie Gordon, who was appropriately dressed in Southern homespun. It was accepted by Private E. S. McClung, the color sergeant, who advanced with his corporals and gave a stirring speech.

(Pages 20-21)
Afterward, David excused himself to his room. He sprawled out on his bed, and began reading Ivanhoe for the third time. After a few minutes, his eyelids grew heavy. He yawned, rolled over, and unintentionally fell asleep. Above him, he could see wispy clouds that gradually morphed into the shape of a soldier. The cloud-soldier slowly raised a gun and pointed it at him. With a start, he awoke to find his room dark. Quickly shaking off the alarming dream, he went outside to feed the animals, but Rena informed him that his chores had already been done. He ambled back to his room, lit the kerosene lamp, and picked up his guitar. Perched on the edge of his bed, he gently strummed it. Already, he had managed to figure out five different chords, and could play his favorite, which was the “Bonnie Blue Flag.” For some reason, that song made him proud, not only of being a Southerner, but also for believing in the cause that his father was about to defend, even though the concept was rather vague to him. He knew a few other melodies, too: “Old Zip Coon,” “Aura Lea,” “Old Dan Tucker,” and another favorite, “Cindy.” When he had gone through his repertoire a few times, long enough for his fingertips to start hurting, he put the instrument back in the corner.

(Page 24)
Before sunup, he tended to the hogs and chickens, and hitched Joe Boy to the wagon. He readied himself for church, and joined his family for a quick breakfast of biscuits and honey before it was time to leave. They rode to a small, white, steepled chapel nestled in a valley, the same Baptist church that David had been baptized in, had grown up in, and had known all his life. Family members were buried in the church’s graveyard, including grandparents from both his mother’s and father’s sides, as well as aunts, uncles, cousins, and his own little brother, Elijah. The service was similar to that performed every Sunday, except this time, Pastor Tidwell made a point of including Bud and Hiram in his prayer so that they might be sheltered by the Almighty on their journey “to protect the Southland,” as he put it. Once the service was over, his family stood outside greeting well-wishers. David waited patiently at the wagon until the last members of the congregation had gone, and as his family approached, he climbed up onto the driver’s seat.

(Page 26)
Inexplicably, his heart began racing. Hiram was going off to protect his rights, his property, and his family. He was among Alabama’s finest patriotic sons, the cream of the crop, and the best that the South had to offer. For this, David was immensely grateful, awestruck by the nobility of it all. He could almost feel the exhilaration that his father must be experiencing.

(Page 30)
“If he had good sense, he could see that the South could not be coerced. We are all united as one man, and can whip any lot of Yankees on equal terms. It is useless for them to wage war on us, for we can defy the world if they invade us.”

(Page 30)
One of the men, George Washington Jones, who was an assistant quartermaster of the regiment, guffawed. “All the South wants is her independence!” he declared.

(Page 31)
During the month of May, the Confederacy’s capital moved from Montgomery to Richmond, and another southern state, North Carolina, seceded. Hiram learned that the reason for his regiment’s relocation was because Union forces had moved into Virginia and seized Alexandria, which was nearly seventy miles away. Although the situation seemed to be worsening, strangely enough, visitors from Huntsville steadily arrived to see their boys, bringing gifts and letters. Citizens from home temporarily took their own places in the ranks as privates, readying for the fight, but the Yankees failed to appear, and rumors of the Federals’ impending advances proved to be false.

(Page 31)
Word reached the troops that on May 24, a New York infantry regiment led by Colonel Elmer Ellsworth arrived in Alexandria. A large Southern flag had been displayed from the Marshall House Hotel, which was visible from Washington. The colonel attempted to remove it himself, but was shot in the chest with a double-barrel shotgun by the proprietor of the hotel, James W. Jackson, who in return was shot and bayoneted to death. Few members of the 4th Alabama expressed remorse for the loss of Ellsworth, especially since he had been a close friend of President Lincoln. In their opinion, it was only a shame that Jackson had been murdered for defending his rights.

(Pages 36-37)
Slowly, feeling like she was floating, she approached the others, passing by the dry goods, the glass cases displaying pottery, clothing, and sewing notions, and under farm equipment hanging from the ceiling rafters. Some of the women were sobbing, covering their faces with handkerchiefs, while others turned away, or stared at her with vacant eyes. As they drifted off, she stepped toward the ominous poster, held her breath, and forced herself to gaze upon the names. When she had reached the bottom, she breathed a sigh of relief. Hiram’s name wasn’t on the list, although she recognized one that was. Turning toward the counter, she wiped a trickling tear from her cheek, walked over, and requested a copy of the Southern Advocate.

(Page 42)
“That much is true,” Kit agreed. “Congress wasn’t willin’ to listen to us Southrons.”

(Page 48)
“Crittenden, from Kentucky. My kinfolk live up that way, and told me all about it.” He paused, but hearing no objection, continued. “The good senator tried his darnedest to make those humbugs up in Washin’ton come to their senses.” Seeing David look at him questioningly, he elaborated. “He proposed a bill that would entitle each new state to vote if it wanted slavery, and for the plantation owners to be compensated for their slaves, should their niggers be set free. But ole ‘Rail Splitter’ Lincoln and his cronies in Congress shot down his bill. Now the poor senator has one son fightin’ for the North, and the other one fightin’ for the South.”

(Page 55)

“These are well-established principles of war, and the people of the South having appealed to war are barred from appealing to our Constitution, which they have practically and publicly defied. They have appealed to war, and must abide its rules and laws. The United States, as a belligerent party claiming right in the soil as the ultimate sovereign, have a right to change the population, and it may be and is, both politic and just, we should do so in certain districts.”
—William Tecumseh Sherman


(Page 56)
The 4th Alabama’s commanding officers had either returned or resigned. Captain Tracy had been transferred and promoted in August. Major Scott, a typical old Southern gentleman, returned home to recuperate, and was replaced by Captain Bowles. Lawrence Scruggs was appointed captain of the North Alabamians.

(Page 56)
May those Northern fanatics who abuse their Southern neighbors,
Approach near enough to feel the point of our sabers;
May they come near enough to hear the click of a trigger,
And learn that a white man is better than a nigger.

(Page 62)
“They’ve moved into the train depot, the Female Seminary, and the Green Academy for boys,” Emily went on. “They’ve stolen and robbed from anyone they can, and they go out of their way to frighten us. They even steal from the poor niggers, who are learnin’ to hate those thievin’ Yankees as much as our Southern brethren do. The freed slaves come to the soldiers, who jist tear up their freedom papers, whip them, and send them back home.”

(Page 62)
“It was. Till the Yankees had Dr. Ross arrested for offerin’ prayers for the success of the South.”

(Page 67)
Inexplicably, Union forces backed off, so the Rebels were able to continue on unmolested until they reached the outskirts of Richmond. They camped there for three weeks. During that time, the men managed to obtain news that on May 15, the CSS Alabama had been launched from England, and five days later, the Homestead Act was signed into law. Before the war, Southern states had opposed the act because of its anti-slavery sentiment, but now there were no Southern states represented in Congress to contest it. The act allowed settlers to occupy, improve, and farm 160-acre parcels of land in the Western territories for five years, but without the use of slaves. If, after that time, the farmers were successful in establishing a farmstead, the land was theirs to keep.

(Page 76)
On July 1, 1862, President Lincoln signed the Pacific Railroad Act, which laid the foundation for completion of the transcontinental railroad. The track would run from Omaha to Sacramento. Because no Southern state officials were present in Congress, Lincoln took the liberty of having the railroad built through Northern states, thus accentuating their economic prosperity. Once word spread to Ben Johnson’s mercantile, the men who frequented the establishment were, of course, outraged. But one bright spot appeared: General Mitchel was recalled from Huntsville to Washington, charged with failing in his duty to repress pillaging and plundering, and for allowing illegal shipments of cotton to be sent north.

(Page 79)
David stood silently listening, and thought of Percy, surprising himself by feeling a twinge of pity. No one seemed to want the blacks, North or South. How the slaves could ever be freed remained a mystery to him, because even if they were, they wouldn’t have anyplace to go.

(Page 79)
By now, many of the Southern soldiers wore tattered clothing and were without shoes. All had little rations, since the Seven Days Battles had depleted Virginia of crops and livestock, which had been taken by both advancing armies. Because of heavy rain and exposure to the elements, numerous men fell victim to fever. Bud was no exception. He tried to hide his ailment, but Hiram knew him too well.

(Page 88)
On October 8, the Battle of Perryville took place, which was Kentucky’s only major battle thus far, between Union General Buell and Confederate General Braxton Bragg. Because the Republicans thought Buell was proslavery for wanting to protect Southerners’ property, he was relieved of his command. On October 9, General Longstreet was promoted to lieutenant general. A day later, so was General Jackson, and on that same day, General Stuart began his raid into Pennsylvania. The troopers rode up to Chambersburg, where they helped themselves to fresh horses and newly harvested fodder. They continued on around the Union army and returned to Virginia, completing Stuart’s second ride around McClellan.

(Page 93)
It seemed obvious by what the press was reporting that, because of Lincoln’s declared Emancipation Proclamation, the chances of Europe backing the C.S.A. were quelled. England and France had considered supporting the Southern states before the war became an issue of slavery, but now it was something they didn’t want to get involved in. The Confederacy was completely on its own.

(Page 97)
Some of the Rebels managed to converse with the enemy, even though it was strictly forbidden, and exchange their tobacco for much-desired coffee and sugar. After a while, though, a treaty was established, and the Southerners sent across a plank, with a mast made from a current Richmond newspaper. The Federals sent their “boat” to the Southern port, using a mast constructed from a Northern newspaper. Thus, the two sides stayed abreast of what the media was saying.

(Page 98)
On several occasions, Hiram heard music float across the river. The Yankee bands played new songs he had never heard before. One sounded like “John Brown’s Body,” but the words had been changed. This, he learned, was the Union army’s new anthem, “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” He didn’t appreciate the lyrics, since they equated the Confederates to devils, but listened with interest, nonetheless. Another Yankee song they played repetitively was called the “Battle Cry of Freedom.” He liked that one better, but it still didn’t make his spirit soar like “Dixie” did. The Federals played “The Star-Spangled Banner” and “Hail Columbia,” songs the Southerners once held dear, and waited for Confederate bands to reply, but no reprisal came. As if reading Hiram’s mind, the Yankees rambunctiously played “Dixie’s Land.” Men on both sides of the river burst into cheers, which fell away to mutual laughter.

(Page 102)
The Alabamians were told that Fredericksburg had been left in terrible condition. The Yankees were allowed to freely loot, ransack, burn, and pillage anything and everything, which infuriated the Rebels. Bud decided that the pity he had felt while on the battlefield was wasted. Those bastards don’t deserve my sympathy, he reasoned. The invaders caused too many innocents to suffer, and although they had been led like obedient lambs to slaughter, they got what they deserved for desecrating the good Southern people of Fredericksburg. It’s God’s wrath at work, he decided. They brought on their own destruction.

(Page 102)
With the battle’s end, optimism grew about Europe’s possible renewed interest in supporting the Southern cause.

(Page 105)
Three million fought, and 620,000, or 2 percent of the male population, died in the War Between the States. One-fourth of all Southern men were killed.

Search result for 'South' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 1: Chapter One
"...and he began daydreaming out of boredom, thinking about the changes that had taken place. In his opinion, it had all started two years ago and had escalated from there. First was John Brown’s raid, followed by his hanging. After that came Lincoln’s election, and now, one by one, Southern states were seceding. His own beloved Alabama had been the fourth to leave the Union only a month ago. Since then, three more states had disaffiliated. The country was splitting in two. A slight breeze blew by, causing him to shiver from the cold February chill. He forced himself ..."
37.
"... the platform. “I reckon he’s referrin’ to the fact that Northern tyranny has suppressed us here in the South,” Jenny’s husband, Nate, said softly, giving an affirmative nod. “And if the Yankees don’t allow us to leave peaceably, we’ll take up arms if need be.” A horse ..."
"...A crowd had gathered, who cheered welcomingly. The president raised his hand to say a few words, and all fell quiet. After greeting everyone, he alluded to the causes that had imposed the formation of what he called the “Southern Republic.” According to him, the South had no desire to aggravate hostilities with other sections of “this great continent.” ..."
94.
"... electin’ ole Abe, the Yankees made a declaration of war,” said Bud. “He wasn’t even on the ballot in ten states, all Southern, of course,” stated Hiram. “They burned him in effigy, right here in Huntsville.” “The stock market plummeted because they elected that black ..."
97.
"... and makin’ it a whole new country in and of itself.” “I heard about that,” responded Mr. Kimball. “They were fixin’ to call it the Free State of Nickajack, so’s it would be a neutral state betwixt the North and South.” David grinned at the name. He wouldn’t have minded living ..."
"...On March 27, the Huntsville Democrat reported that a company known as the Madison Rifles was being called into service, and a few days later, so were the Huntsville Guards under Captain Egbert Jones. Alabama was preparing for war, and things were heating up. The entire Southern nation was up in arms, waiting for a reason to fight. ..."
"...Two quiet weeks passed. He helped his father plant rows of peas, and tilled the soil, preparing it for corn and sorghum. Their peacefulness didn’t last long, for news came that Fort Sumter, off the coast of South Carolina in Charleston Harbor, had been bombarded by Confederate forces and captured. Two days later, President Lincoln called for 75,000 volunteers, evidence that a war was now truly imminent. On April 17, Virginia seceded, and two days later, a mob of Southern sympathizers in Baltimore attacked the 6th Massachusetts ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 2: Chapter Two
"...Five days later, Hiram was requested to attend a flag presentation with the rest of the newly enlisted North Alabamians, Company I. The Southern Advocate described the festivities that had transpired the evening before, when the Huntsville Guards were presented with their flag, which rivaled that of another new company, the Madison Rifles. According to the newspaper article, Miss Sallie McKie presented the silk flag to Lieutenant Gus Mastin, who in return gave ..."
"...After the banquet, a ceremony commenced, beginning with a patriotic oration given by one of the officers. A banner sewn by the Ladies Aid Society in Huntsville was presented to the new company by Miss Carrie Gordon, who was appropriately dressed in Southern homespun. It was accepted by Private E. S. McClung, the color sergeant, who advanced with his corporals and gave a stirring speech. ..."
"...picked up his guitar. Perched on the edge of his bed, he gently strummed it. Already, he had managed to figure out five different chords, and could play his favorite, which was the “Bonnie Blue Flag.” For some reason, that song made him proud, not only of being a Southerner, but also for believing in the cause that his father was about to defend, even though the concept was rather vague to him. He knew a few other melodies, too: “Old Zip Coon,” “Aura Lea,” “Old Dan Tucker,” and another favorite, “Cindy.” When he had gone through his repertoire ..."
"...aunts, uncles, cousins, and his own little brother, Elijah. The service was similar to that performed every Sunday, except this time, Pastor Tidwell made a point of including Bud and Hiram in his prayer so that they might be sheltered by the Almighty on their journey “to protect the Southland,” as he put it. Once the service was over, his family stood outside greeting well-wishers. David waited patiently at the wagon until the last members of the congregation had gone, and as his family approached, he climbed up onto the driver’s seat. ..."
"...Inexplicably, his heart began racing. Hiram was going off to protect his rights, his property, and his family. He was among Alabama’s finest patriotic sons, the cream of the crop, and the best that the South had to offer. For this, David was immensely grateful, awestruck by the nobility of it all. He could almost feel the exhilaration that his father must be experiencing. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 3: Chapter Three
52.
"... of.” The men chortled. “If he had good sense, he could see that the South could not be coerced. We are all united as one man, and can whip any lot of Yankees on equal terms. It is useless for them to wage war on us, for we can defy the world if they invade us.” One of the men, George ..."
53.
"... to wage war on us, for we can defy the world if they invade us.” One of the men, George Washington Jones, who was an assistant quartermaster of the regiment, guffawed. “All the South wants is her independence!” he declared. “I’ll drink to that!” another man, Enoch Campbell, ..."
"...Southg the month of May, the Confederacy’s capital moved from Montgomery to Richmond, and another Southern state, North Carolina, seceded. Hiram learned that the reason for his regiment’s relocation was because Union forces had moved into Virginia and seized Alexandria, which was nearly seventy miles away. Although the situation seemed ..."
"...Word reached the troops that on May 24, a New York infantry regiment led by Colonel Elmer Ellsworth arrived in Alexandria. A large Southern flag had been displayed from the Marshall House Hotel, which was visible from Washington. The colonel attempted to remove it himself, but was shot in the chest with a double-barrel shotgun by the proprietor of the hotel, James W. Jackson, who in return was shot and bayoneted to death. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 4: Chapter Four
"...to gaze upon the names. When she had reached the bottom, she breathed a sigh of relief. Hiram’s name wasn’t on the list, although she recognized one that was. Turning toward the counter, she wiped a trickling tear from her cheek, walked over, and requested a copy of the Southern Advocate. ..."
134.
"... they’ve already tried talkin’ it out,” remarked David, “but it didn’t do any good.” “That much is true,” Kit agreed. “Congress wasn’t willin’ to listen to us Southrons.” “Let’s hope you’re right, then, Mr. Lawrence,” said Caroline. “We should all pray that ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 5: Chapter Five
"...and for the plantation owners to be compensated for their slaves, should their niggers be set free. But ole ‘Rail Splitter’ Lincoln and his cronies in Congress shot down his bill. Now the poor senator has one son fightin’ for the North, and the other one fightin’ for the South.” ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 6: Chapter Six
"...Southeather had been typical, although Hiram, Bud, and the rest of their regiment thought differently, since they were unaccustomed to Virginia’s snowy winters. General Joe Johnston’s Army of Northern Virginia established their winter quarters, and the camp sprawled from Fredericksburg Southwest into the Shenandoah Valley, with the 4th Alabama constructing ..."
"...The 4th Alabama’s commanding officers had either returned or resigned. Captain Tracy had been transferred and promoted in August. Major Scott, a typical old Southern gentleman, returned home to recuperate, and was replaced by Captain Bowles. Lawrence Scruggs was appointed captain of the North Alabamians. ..."
11.
"... closest comrades, and he frequently transcribed dictation that amused him. For Blue Hugh’s request, he wrote: May those Northern fanatics who abuse their Southern neighbors, Approach near enough to feel the point of our sabers; May they come near enough to hear the click of a ..."
"...Southal Johnston relocated the 4th Alabama to join with the main army South of the Rappahannock and moved it in the direction of Richmond. In early March, he learned that McClellan was encroaching, so he hastily transferred his troops from Centreville, leaving behind half-cooked food and property belonging to the ..."
"...South days later, on Thursday, April 10, Jake accompanied David to the mercantile, where they received terrible news. The Yankees had won the battle at Shiloh, forcing the defeated Confederates to retreat South. Rumor had it that the Federals were giving chase by also heading in their direction. The boys ..."
"...South and Jake glared at each other. Having no other plan of recourse, they exited out the kitchen door to the back alley, with Jake concealing the awkward bundle inside his coat. They made their way to their waiting mounts and galloped away from the infested town. After traveling a ..."
92.
"... our fellers chasin’ them off,” Jake remarked, leaning back against the trunk. “I heard that, too. Reckon we’re lucky to be this far South, or they’d come and take away all our worldly possessions.” “Not without a fight.” Jake flashed a cunning smile at his friend. “What do ..."
"...the Female Seminary, and the Green Academy for boys,” Emily went on. “They’ve stolen and robbed from anyone they can, and they go out of their way to frighten us. They even steal from the poor niggers, who are learnin’ to hate those thievin’ Yankees as much as our Southern brethren do. The freed slaves come to the soldiers, who jist tear up their freedom papers, whip them, and send them back home.” ..."
143.
"... like he was prayin’, too!” The threesome giggled. “That is funny!” said Jake. “It was. Till the Yankees had Dr. Ross arrested for offerin’ prayers for the success of the South.” The boys groaned. “We saw where they burned some of the bridges and cattle guards on the way ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 7: Chapter Seven
"...unmolested until they reached the outskirts of Richmond. They camped there for three weeks. During that time, the men managed to obtain news that on May 15, the CSS Alabama had been launched from England, and five days later, the Homestead Act was signed into law. Before the war, Southern states had opposed the act because of its anti-slavery sentiment, but now there were no Southern states represented in Congress to contest it. The act allowed settlers to occupy, improve, and farm 160-acre parcels of land in the Western territories for five years, but without the use of slaves. ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 8: Chapter Eight
"...Southal McClellan moved his vast army to the South side of the Chickahominy River, in an attempt to confront Lee below Richmond. While he was there, the commander of Robert E. Lee’s Confederate cavalry, General J. E. B. Stuart, received fame by riding around McClellan’s troops. Originally ordered to reconnoiter ..."
"...On July 1, 1862, President Lincoln signed the Pacific Railroad Act, which laid the foundation for completion of the transcontinental railroad. The track would run from Omaha to Sacramento. Because no Southern state officials were present in Congress, Lincoln took the liberty of having the railroad built through Northern states, thus accentuating their economic prosperity. Once word spread to Ben Johnson’s mercantile, the men who frequented the establishment were, of course, outraged. But one bright spot appeared: General Mitchel was recalled ..."
80.
"... home.” David stood silently listening, and thought of Percy, surprising himself by feeling a twinge of pity. No one seemed to want the blacks, North or South. How the slaves could ever be freed remained a mystery to him, because even if they were, they wouldn’t have anyplace to go. General ..."
"...By now, many of the Southern soldiers wore tattered clothing and were without shoes. All had little rations, since the Seven Days Battles had depleted Virginia of crops and livestock, which had been taken by both advancing armies. Because of heavy rain and exposure to the elements, numerous men fell victim to fever. Bud was ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 9: Chapter Nine
"...give up the chase, so he turned his troops toward Leesburg. On Saturday, September 6, the Alabamians crossed the Potomac into Maryland, leaving behind surplus wagons, their baggage, broken batteries, worn-out horses, and unnecessary gear. They continued north to Fredericktown, and by September 10, they approached Hagerstown after crossing South Mountain at Boonesborough Gap. ..."
"...out. Captain Scruggs, who fell wounded, was quickly replaced by Captain Robbins. Realizing that they were at an advantage, the Rebels shot down scores of Yankees while concealing themselves in the cover of trees, fighting savagely despite their extreme hunger and fatigue. Other regiments of their brigade, the Texans, South Carolinians, and Georgians, were out in the open on their left, and suffered because of it. As dawn began to lighten the sky, Hiram noticed a Union general riding around the field on a large white horse. ..."
"...On October 8, the Battle of Perryville took place, which was Kentucky’s only major battle thus far, between Union General Buell and Confederate General Braxton Bragg. Because the Republicans thought Buell was proslavery for wanting to protect Southerners’ property, he was relieved of his command. On October 9, General Longstreet was promoted to lieutenant general. A day later, so was General Jackson, and on that same day, General Stuart began his raid into Pennsylvania. The troopers rode up to Chambersburg, where they helped themselves to fresh horses ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
"...It seemed obvious by what the press was reporting that, because of Lincoln’s declared Emancipation Proclamation, the chances of Europe backing the C.S.A. were quelled. England and France had considered supporting the Southern states before the war became an issue of slavery, but now it was something they didn’t want to get involved in. The Confederacy was completely on its own. ..."
"...South glanced around at his comrades, who were entrenched on either side of him, waiting for another Yankee advance. With time to reflect, he thought back to the previous month’s events. The 4th Alabama had abandoned their encampment for Culpeper Court House, and stayed there until November 22, when Lee ..."
"...Some of the Rebels managed to converse with the enemy, even though it was strictly forbidden, and exchange their tobacco for much-desired coffee and sugar. After a while, though, a treaty was established, and the Southerners sent across a plank, with a mast made from a current Richmond newspaper. The Federals sent their “boat” to the Southern port, using a mast constructed from a Northern newspaper. Thus, the two sides stayed abreast of what the media was saying. ..."
"...the Confederates to devils, but listened with interest, nonetheless. Another Yankee song they played repetitively was called the “Battle Cry of Freedom.” He liked that one better, but it still didn’t make his spirit soar like “Dixie” did. The Federals played “The Star-Spangled Banner” and “Hail Columbia,” songs the Southerners once held dear, and waited for Confederate bands to reply, but no reprisal came. As if reading Hiram’s mind, the Yankees rambunctiously played “Dixie’s Land.” Men on both sides of the river burst into cheers, which fell away to mutual laughter. ..."
"...camp, Bud and his comrades learned that they had lost five, with seventeen wounded. Their regiment didn’t fire a single shot. The Yankees, it was estimated, lost over nine thousand after making fourteen assaults that were all beaten back. The men heard of one brave soul, Sergeant Kirkland of South Carolina, who acquired a reputation as the “Angel of Marye’s Heights” for crossing enemy lines and benevolently tending to the Union wounded by providing them with blankets and water. John Pelham, an Alabama son who was in charge of Jackson’s artillery, received praise from General Lee for bravely executing ..."
"...decided that the pity he had felt while on the battlefield was wasted. Those bastards don’t deserve my sympathy, he reasoned. The invaders caused too many innocents to suffer, and although they had been led like obedient lambs to slaughter, they got what they deserved for desecrating the good Southern people of Fredericksburg. It’s God’s wrath at work, he decided. They brought on their own destruction. ..."
189.
"... It’s God’s wrath at work, he decided. They brought on their own destruction. With the battle’s end, optimism grew about Europe’s possible renewed interest in supporting the Southern cause. “Since we whipped them infernal Yankees,” Enoch Campbell declared, “they might think ..."

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"The history is intertwined ingeniously into the plot. It is well plotted and the narrative moves along at nice clip...."

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