A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'Union' mean?

Find out what Union means. Union is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Union

Also known as the North, or the United States. The Union was the portion of the country that remained with the Federal government during the Civil War. Union states included Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin. West Virginia became a Union state after it separated from Virginia in 1863. California and Oregon were considered to be a Union state, although they had little involvement during the war. In my novel, A Beautiful Glittering Lie, the term "Union" is used as follows:

(Page 8)
David found himself swaying slightly, his feet growing tired from standing, since he had been in the same spot for over an hour, waiting for the president’s arrival. His tall, lanky frame slumped as he shoved his cold hands deep into his coat pockets. Unintentionally, his mind drifted, and he began daydreaming out of boredom, thinking about the changes that had taken place. In his opinion, it had all started two years ago and had escalated from there. First was John Brown’s raid, followed by his hanging. After that came Lincoln’s election, and now, one by one, Southern states were seceding. His own beloved Alabama had been the fourth to leave the Union only a month ago. Since then, three more states had disaffiliated. The country was splitting in two. A slight breeze blew by, causing him to shiver from the cold February chill. He forced himself to listen once again.

(Page 8)
“There can be but little rivalry between ours and any manufacturin’ or navigatin’ community, such as the Northeastern States of the American Union,” said the president-elect. “It must follow, therefore, that mutual interest would invite goodwill and kind offices. If, however, passion or the lust of dominion should cloud the judgment or inflame the ambition of those states, we must prepare to meet the emergency and maintain, by the final arbitrament of the sword, the position which we have assumed among the nations of the earth …”

(Page 13)
Kit Lawrence, a childhood friend of David’s father, protested. “We should support the Union by not takin’ up arms,” he growled.

(Page 29)
On the following day, May 6, Arkansas seceded from the Union, and on the following day, the 4th Alabama was inducted into Confederate service, mustered in for the duration of one year. Following several days of idleness, the recruits embarked yet again via train to Strasburg, Virginia, arriving on May 11. The weather had become partly cloudy, to the men’s delight. They rested in the afternoon, and prepared rations for the next day’s march that evening.

(Page 31)
During the month of May, the Confederacy’s capital moved from Montgomery to Richmond, and another southern state, North Carolina, seceded. Hiram learned that the reason for his regiment’s relocation was because Union forces had moved into Virginia and seized Alexandria, which was nearly seventy miles away. Although the situation seemed to be worsening, strangely enough, visitors from Huntsville steadily arrived to see their boys, bringing gifts and letters. Citizens from home temporarily took their own places in the ranks as privates, readying for the fight, but the Yankees failed to appear, and rumors of the Federals’ impending advances proved to be false.

(Page 31)
May gave way to June, and a week later, Tennessee seceded from the Union.

(Page 32)
Sweet heart please keep us in your upmost prayers. Give our daughters a kiss for me and tell David not to fret about the heat. Know that my love for you is endless. If the Union keeps procrastinating this war should be over in a matter of days.

(page 32)
News came that Union General George B. McClellan had driven the Confederates out of the Allegheny Mountains, thus bringing the western portion of Virginia under U.S. control. By doing so, he secured himself a nickname, “Little Napoleon.” A short time later, it was reported that the U.S. Sanitary Commission had been founded by a group of New York women who intended to promote healthful practices within the ranks. Although Rebel forces had no such committee, they followed suit with similar designs.

(Page 32)
By mid-July, the Union Army finally began to move, and on Thursday, July 18, the Alabamians received orders to strike tents and cook two days’ rations in preparation for a march. The sick, who were principally suffering from the measles, were left behind in Winchester.

(Page 33)
It wasn’t long before the Yankees came into view: their appearance seemed surreal. The men of the 4th Alabama were confronted with the entire advancing Union Army. As they neared, the regiments on either side of the North Alabamians fell away. Colonel Jones ordered his men to hold fast their line of defense while he had them march up a hill to a low fence surrounding a cornfield.

(Page 33)
For some reason, the Union Army ceased firing at noon. Bracing themselves for another attack, the Rebels utilized the time to check their firearms. Word came that artillery was running low, which caused a slight panic, but Jones assured his men that they could win the battle before their ammunition ran out.

(Page 33)
After two hours of quiet, the Yankees resumed their assault, and the Confederates fought off several Union advances. Men in colorful garb fashioned after French Algerian Zouaves attacked first, but were driven back. Then came, one at a time, three other regiments, but all eventually broke and ran. Their uniforms caused confusion, for men on either side were dressed in both blue and gray, including Colonel Jones, who wore the blue uniform he had donned while previously serving in the U.S. Army.

(Page 33)
The 4th Alabama was finally flanked. As the regiment was commanded to retire, Old Battalion was hit in the leg, forcing Colonel Jones to dismount. In a hail of bullets, he too was hit in both thighs, and crumbled to the ground with a broken left leg. Law immediately took command, managing to retire his troops, but was compelled to leave Jones on the field because Union soldiers had forded Bull Run River. Major Scott went down, shot through the leg. Law fell next, his arm broken by a Yankee’s bullet, and was quickly taken from the field. The remaining Alabamians now had no one to guide them. They stood in mass confusion while men writhed around them on the ground, bloody and dying. Smoke and thunder filled the air.

(Page 35)
Later in the day, it was learned that General Bee had died from wounds he received. The white clapboard house at the center of the battle belonged to an invalid old woman by the name of Judith Carter Henry. Unable to leave her bed, she had been riddled with bullets. The Federals were commanded by Brigadier General Irvin McDowell. Generals Johnston and Beauregard of the Confederacy had proven themselves a worthy foe, and apparently had defeated the Union soldiers. Hiram and his comrades hoped that, by showing their mettle, they would bring a rapid end to the conflict, thus winning their right to secede.

(Page 46)
President Lincoln appointed his “Little Napoleon,” George McClellan, to the position of general-in-chief of all Union forces on November 1. This followed the resignation of Winfield Scott, a hero in the Mexican War, who had acquired the nickname “Old Fuss and Feathers,” but was now too old and too obese to continue in his current capacity. McClellan had graduated from West Point, in the same class as Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson.

(Page 54)
David pondered Mr. Ryan’s statement. The Union troops were encroaching, that much was certain. How close they would get was unknown, but it was still very unsettling. If they did come down to Alabama, he would have to invent a plan to preserve his family and possessions. Suddenly, he felt strangely alone and vulnerable, even though he knew he was surrounded by friends. His pa was too far away, and if Yankees came to the farm, none of his neighbors would be close enough to help, either. He had to find a way to fight them off by himself.

(Page 56)
The 4th Alabama received word that Stonewall Jackson had attacked Union forces in the Shenandoah Valley, forcing the Yankees to rush back to Washington and defend the city from a possible Confederate attack. They also learned that Nathan Bedford Forrest’s men were on the move in Tennessee, and great concern arose over the possible invasion of Alabama by Union troops. A significant battle had taken place at Pea Ridge, Arkansas, with triumphant Union troops seizing control of the Missouri River. And at the mouth of the James River, the CSS Virginia, the first of its kind, called an “ironclad,” met its equal with the Union’s ironclad, the USS Monitor. Both ships fired upon each other throughout the day of March 9, but neither was victorious. The Virginia was unable to penetrate and destroy the Union blockade.

(Page 57)
With the advent of April, the Rebels were informed that McClellan was gathering his Union troops in preparation for a march on Richmond, and they knew it wouldn’t be long before they were called upon for defense. It was just a matter of time.

(Page 57)
The family learned three days later that a great battle was taking place in Tennessee, near Shiloh Church, which was only about eighty miles from Huntsville. Reports of the battle were carried in by courier. David eagerly hovered around Ben Johnson’s in anticipation of incoming telegrams, and while he was there, a courier rode in. According to the messenger, some twenty thousand troops were converging on the area, and the fighting was bloody. Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston had been killed, and the Union army had been chased back to Pittsburg Landing on the Tennessee River. From the looks of things, the Rebels were victorious, according to the dispatch rider, who immediately set off toward Huntsville to retrieve more information. Waving his hat in the air, he let out a whoop and rode away.

(Page 57)
Ormsby Mitchel’s Union army marched into undefended Huntsville early the following morning. Once David and Jake found out, they couldn’t wait to investigate, and they finally found the opportunity to sneak off early one crisp spring morning a week later.

(Page 57)
Devising a plan, they told their parents they were staying at each other’s homes for two nights, thus buying themselves extra time for their adventure. With Jake on Stella and David on Cotaco, they stealthily made their way up to Huntsville. Once they arrived at the outskirts of town the following day, they were awed by the spectacle that lay before them. Union soldiers were everywhere, like blue ants on a picnic, swarming about the city streets. No civilians were in sight. David and Jake tied their horses behind a shed half a mile out and headed into town. They slinked past sentries, cowered behind wagons, barrels, and buildings, and hid in the shadows, making their way toward the courthouse. As they crouched behind a cluster of budding shrubs in front of an enormous white Greek-revival house, peering out at a patrol of Yankees marching down the street, they muttered to each other in hushed tones.

(Pages 58-59)
Meanwhile, the Confederacy passed the Conscription Act, which required all men aged eighteen years and older to enlist. Many felt the law was a contradiction to state sovereignty, which was what the Confederacy had been founded on. Newspapers reported that Fort Pulaski, located at the mouth of the Savannah River, had fallen, and Union forces captured it by using rifled cannon. They also printed that, on April 12, what was being called the “Great Locomotive Chase” took place. Several Federal volunteers had attempted to steal the Confederate locomotive General, but were discovered as they headed north from Big Shanty, Georgia. The Confederate crew of the Texas chased the General with their train in reverse, and finally captured it north of Ringgold. The story made great fodder for adventure-seeking readers. Hiram knew it wouldn’t be long before dime novels exploited the event, which meant his son would eagerly devour it. Still waiting to embark on an adventure of their own, the men of the 4th Alabama sat poised on their haunches, impatiently waiting for another battle. They learned that Huntsville had become occupied and vowed vengeance in whatever capacity they could manage, be it when they returned home on furlough, or sooner.

(Page 59)
The situation was worsening in Huntsville, as Union soldiers went on a rampage. Their commander, Ormsby Mitchel, turned a blind eye to his soldiers’ pilfering. Federal gunboats patrolled up and down the Tennessee River, shelling towns and settlements along the banks. The Yankees burned, plundered, and foraged from the poor displaced souls, and raiding parties became more frequent. When David learned of the abomination, he considered joining up with a local group of Rebels who were retaliating. These guerrillas, as they were known, were a force to be reckoned with, for even though their group was small, they were fiercely lethal.

(Page 61)
Before sunup, he completed his chores, saddled and bridled Sally with his new tack, and stole away after leaving his mother a brief note as to his whereabouts, stating that he would be at Jake’s for two days, and probably wouldn’t be home until later in the week, making up an excuse about bow-hunting for deer. He rode down the familiar dirt road, making his way in the dark, but didn’t pay it any mind, because he was so accustomed to the trek that he could do it with his eyes closed. As the sun peered above the horizon, casting a pink hue across the cobalt sky, birds began twittering in the trees. He arrived at the Kimballs’, and once Jake saddled up, they were on their way, traveling through intermittent sprinkles, bedding down that evening in a makeshift shelter, and continuing on until they arrived at the Tennessee River. To their dismay, several Union pickets were stationed at the bridge.

(Page 63)
A few of the Federals heard his voice. They turned to look, but David and Jake quickly backed into the shadows to avoid being detected. The Union soldiers filed past.

(Page 66)
“It’s ironic, too,” Mr. Powell interjected, “because Athens flew the stars and stripes longer than the rest of the state in protest for not havin’ secession submitted to the popular vote. They wanted to stay in the Union, and now they’re bein’ attacked by it.”

(Pages 66-67)
The following morning, they learned that a regiment of Union soldiers had gotten ahead of them in an attempt to cut them off. General Whiting, the brigade commander, galloped past them on his steed, his hands clasped and his face raised to the sky in prayer while he rode to the front. Later on in the day, General Hood managed to push the Yankees back, prompting some of the men to comment on how General Whiting’s prayers had been answered. One of the North Alabamians, Orderly Sergeant Hartley, and a private from Company A, were sent out as scouts later that evening, but when morning came, only the private returned. Sergeant Hartley had been shot, and the private brought back his bullet-pierced roll book to prove it. Hiram and the rest of Company I once again felt sorrow, for although Hartley had been from Connecticut, he was well liked, and a true Confederate patriot.

(Page 67)
Inexplicably, Union forces backed off, so the Rebels were able to continue on unmolested until they reached the outskirts of Richmond. They camped there for three weeks. During that time, the men managed to obtain news that on May 15, the CSS Alabama had been launched from England, and five days later, the Homestead Act was signed into law. Before the war, Southern states had opposed the act because of its anti-slavery sentiment, but now there were no Southern states represented in Congress to contest it. The act allowed settlers to occupy, improve, and farm 160-acre parcels of land in the Western territories for five years, but without the use of slaves. If, after that time, the farmers were successful in establishing a farmstead, the land was theirs to keep.

(Page 67)
The Alabamians learned that Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson had been victorious in Winchester, driving General Nathaniel P. Banks’ Union forces north, and had captured scores of Yankee soldiers, as well as their supply wagons. Because of it, the Rebels were referring to the Union general as “Commissary” Banks. Hiram happily contrived a song about their revered general that soon caught on in camp.

(Page 67)
After a while, the 4th Alabama became restless, with nothing to break up the monotony of their inactivity, except for their artillery, which fired halfheartedly at the Union army’s observation balloon. Hiram’s messmates expressed their discontent about being idle as well, and Blue Hugh complained the most, living up to his nickname. Hiram expected the man’s cynicism to dissipate once spring set in, but instead, Blue Hugh just became more sarcastic.

(Pages 67-68)
Early the following morning, the Alabamians traveled eight miles to the beat of their drums toward Seven Pines and their foe. The Stars and Bars, St. Andrews Cross, the regimental colors, and the Bonnie Blue Flag all flew gallantly above the advancing Confederates. Once they arrived, they saw that the Union army had been driven out, for all that remained were their empty tents. Throughout the course of the day, the 4th was maneuvered to different locations, but still didn’t see any fighting. By evening, they had been placed on the Richmond and York River railroad tracks. The empty camp was in a patch of woods to their left, and an active Union battery was in front of them.

(Page 68)
As soon as the men took their position, the Union soldiers opened fire. The Alabamians were forced to endure an unmerciful bombardment, since no other regiment appeared to support them. While they lay in wait, tolerating the shelling, General Johnston slowly rode up to them. He sat upon his mount, staring off at the advancing Union army. Suddenly, a piece of shell struck him in the shoulder, knocking him off his horse. As rapidly as he had fallen, a group of litter bearers besieged him and carried him off the field.

(Page 68)
Because the position of the regiment was on open ground, it moved at twilight toward the cover of trees and the abandoned Yankee camp, but before the men reached their refuge, another shell exploded in their midst, killing several. Agonized screams pierced the air, and the survivors yelled and cursed as they fled. Union soldiers advanced toward them in the dark. Their voices carried across the field, so the Alabamians could tell they were being pursued. Hiram and his comrades turned and fired upon their adversaries. The Yankees returned the volley. Fighting continued for several minutes until the Federals retired.

(Page 68)
At daybreak, the Confederates waited for the battle to resume. Word spread throughout camp that General Johnston had been replaced by General Smith, who hesitated in bringing on an advancing attack. The men wondered about this proxy, because it was known that General Smith was in ill health. Talk of the wounded reached the North Alabamians, who were saddened to learn that one of the casualties was Gus Mastin, the color bearer for the Huntsville Guards. The same silk flag that had been given to him during the presentation ceremony, featuring the name of the Huntsville Female College, had been taken from his lifeless body by a Union soldier.

(Page 68)
being referred to as his “Seven Immortals,” became more active in their attempts to aggravate General Mitchel in Huntsville. At McDavid’s Mill, they captured four sutlers’ wagons and ninety-six bales of cotton that Northern buyers were preparing to ship north. They also made several attacks on the Union garrison at the railroad bridge over Flint River. On one occasion, they killed a Federal soldier and captured another. Annoyed with their constant harassment, the Union army burned the town of Whitesburg to the ground in retribution. Local businessman, “Uncle” Billy Ryan, distributed supplies to Gurley and his men, as well as to needy families in the area. Harper’s Weekly printed a story about General Mitchel’s success in capturing north Alabama down to the Tennessee River, which included Huntsville. The article, embellished with a beautiful painting of the town, enraged David when he saw it.

(Page 69)
They climbed up onto their horses, and rode toward their destination. Once night fell, they camped out, resuming their trek early the following morning, and after several hours of riding, they reached the familiar barn. Upon entering, the boys saw that it was still abandoned, so they confined their mares, and walked down to the river’s edge. The canoe was right where they had left it nearly two months ago. They paddled across, tied the boat, and set off on foot. Noticing a group of Union soldiers nearby, they took cover in some scrub oaks and waited until the bluecoats walked off. Finally, the boys arrived in Huntsville, but the town seemed deserted of civilians. Only Union soldiers occupied the streets.

(Page 71)
The picket approached, saw they were harmless, and relaxed his weapon. “You boys want to fight for the Union army?”

(Page 72)
“Why, of course they do!” Jake exclaimed. “We want to do our part by preservin’ the glorious Union!”

(Page 74)
On June 17, General Lee sent the 4th Alabama and Hood’s Texans to the Shenandoah Valley to support Stonewall Jackson, while Union General McDowell was ordered to defend Washington against Jackson’s advance. Hiram’s regiment marched 150 miles, and was allowed to rest for only one day during the journey. Eight days later, the men bivouacked near Ashland, twelve miles from Richmond. Circling around McClellan’s army, they were now behind it. The following morning, General Lee pursued the fleeing Federals.

(Page 74)
In the early morning coolness, Hiram marched alongside his comrades, noticing his surroundings as he traveled. Mockingbirds sang from overhanging tree limbs, as did orioles, flickers, and red-winged blackbirds, while they flitted above in the shimmering leaves. He could hear soldiers singing behind him, as well as the echoes of clomping boots and horses’ hooves. The dew-covered grass smelled fresh and clean. At 10:00 a.m., the Rebels reached a bridge that had been partially destroyed by Union pickets, who were now on the opposite side, felling trees to impede them.

(Page 75)
At one point, while the men sat by the roadside, waiting for their scouts and pickets to clear the path ahead, an ambulance drawn by a pair of fine bay horses pulled up. The driver realized too late that he was in the midst of the enemy. Soldiers piled into the ambulance, relieving the driver of any foodstuffs he had. Soon the road was cleared, the men marched on, and the stunned driver, who was with Union General Porter’s corps, was taken prisoner.

(Page 75)
They advanced across. The stench of smoke and sulfur rose up to meet them as they fell victim to the waiting Union artillery and small guns. The roar was nearly deafening, and several men fell screaming to their deaths while the regiment progressed. Smoke was so thick and suffocating that the Rebels choked and coughed. They could barely see ten feet in front of them, but they knew they had to persevere. The Alabamians advanced to find a brigade of A. P. Hill’s Virginians lying in front of the enemy’s lines. Hill, in his distinctive red shirt, rode up and down the line, immune to the shelling. Out of ammunition, and too exhausted to move, the Virginians were forced to endure the shower of bullets and shrapnel that hailed down upon them.

(Page 75)
The Confederates jumped into the Union breastworks, stampeding like cattle. In response, the Federals broke and ran as the Alabamians thundered up the ascent to the second line of defense. The Yankees from the first line swept through the second, and all turned tail. The Rebels kept shrieking, cursing, and running in pursuit. They attacked the third line that waited at the top of the hill. The Union soldiers panicked and fell back, retreating at a run to avoid the charging Confederates, who fired a successful volley into the fleeing enemy. Before the Federals could remove their artillery pieces, the Rebels captured fourteen of them. As the Alabamians watched their enemies escape, their voices rose up in triumphant cheers, which spread through the ranks.

(Page 76)
On June 29, the Rebels crossed the bridge and followed the retreating Union army to Malvern Hill, where McClellan made a stand. The 4th Alabama was subjected to heavy artillery fire while they supported their batteries, until darkness fell, when they were forced to endure a heavy thunderstorm.

(Page 76)
The Union army was far superior in numbers and rations, although McClellan had been fooled into thinking otherwise. The Rebels realized that they had an enormous task before them, but they were willing to accept the challenge, because they adored “Bobby” Lee and Colonel Law. Their loyalty ran deep, even though the men were all too familiar with hunger, as well as discomfort brought on by rain and vermin. Despite new clothing, their shoes were wearing thin. Regardless, they still intended to keep their vow to the Confederacy. Hiram was no different. He fully intended to see the thing through, because his conscience wouldn’t allow it any other way. It was his duty to remain.

(Page 76)
Union sympathizers arrived in Decatur and made it their mission to report Rebels who were hiding in the hills. Union Colonel Abel Streight decided to pursue the offenders, so he took a regiment of infantry and one company of cavalry into the mountains to hunt them down. The cavalry was attacked by Confederate scouts, so they returned to Decatur, but the infantry was successful in capturing the fugitives, and forced them to enlist with the 1st Alabama Cavalry. On July 10, they were inducted into the Union Army.

(Page 76)
“Ma’am,” one of them said, touching the brim of his kepi, “we’ve been sent to scout the area, and if you have anything the Union army deems necessary, it is our lawful right to confiscate it.”

(Page 76)
“We beg to differ, ma’am,” the other Union soldier said cordially. “We don’t want any trouble, but if you make a fuss, we’ll have to send for assistance.”

(Page 76)
Suddenly, his eyes bulged in horrified shock. He grasped the shaft in his side. Another arrow flew through the air past Caroline, making a whispering sound as it traveled, and seated itself into the other Union soldier’s thigh. Before he could react, one more arrow flew by the first Yankee. Another pierced through the second man’s forage cap.

(Page 78)
The following afternoon, just as he was about to conclude that it was safe to bring his family home, a band of Union cavalrymen thundered up the lane. Hearing the horses’ pounding hooves announce their arrival, he hid in the safety of the trees, watching and waiting while he held his breath in anticipation. The men dismounted. They walked into the house and around the premises. To his amazement, they mounted back up and rode off. His plan had worked.

(Page 79)
General Lee’s Confederates spent July and the first part of August recuperating. Jackson moved to Gordonsville, where he encountered Pope, and deceived the Union general by lighting numerous fires to make his forces appear larger than they were. This stratagem proved effective, because Pope retreated, but not before Jackson captured a portion of his army. Meanwhile, the 4th Alabama repositioned from Richmond to Gordonsville to support Jackson. After spending three months in Richmond, they were more than happy to be back on the march. Hiram and Bud joked between themselves as they tramped along, while Bo the dog obediently trotted behind Orange Hugh.

(Page 79)
By August 20, both corps joined together, and continued on across the Rapidan River toward Culpeper Court House. Pope discovered their advance, so he withdrew across the Rappahannock. Once the Rebels arrived, the people of Culpeper came out to greet them, cheering and waving flags in welcome. Some told horror stories of how they had been abused by Pope’s Union army. Others described how Pope’s own men despised him because of his arrogant, pompous nature, and how Pope’s bombastic braggadocio deflated his troops’ morale.

(Page 79)
Jackson’s corps crossed the Rappahannock in an attempt to flank the Union army, while General Lee’s portion stayed behind to keep Pope occupied. The Alabamians learned of Jackson’s departure a few days later, but didn’t flinch in their determination. The fact that they were immensely outnumbered didn’t deter them.

(Page 79)
Information about the dead man filtered back through the ranks, and it was discovered that he was actually a Union spy who had paid for his infraction with his life.

(Page 79)
The Confederates continued to drive the Yankees until they were close, and then waited for their artillery to arrive. Once positioned on the field, the cannons exploded into the Union soldiers.

(Page 81)
The Federals advanced a column of infantry out from the woods toward Jackson and his men, who lay in wait within a railroad cut. They retaliated by firing into them. The two opposing forces clashed in hand-to-hand combat until the Yankees finally retreated. Pope marched out one column after another, only to have each one repelled. Jackson’s men used all of their ammunition, so they had to fight off the advancing Union soldiers by hurling rocks. The 4th Alabama continued to observe until they were called upon, along with General Longstreet’s men, to support Jackson. They rushed to his rescue, and the Yankees were finally forced to retreat, leaving their dead and dying on the field. All the while, artillery from both sides continued firing canister and grapeshot. Billowing smoke hung over the infantrymen as opposing sides shot at each other. Like the previous day, the Confederates again drove their enemies, until nightfall hindered them.

(Page 81)
Later in the day, a soldier from Company A returned to camp, explaining that he had been captured by Sigel’s Dutch, who were really Germans, but in the Federals’ haste to depart, he was left behind. The Confederates were fed better rations than they had been given since leaving Richmond. Musicians in Hiram’s company, Foggarty, Halsey, and Hickey, celebrated the victory by playing Irish music with instruments they found abandoned on the battlefield by the Union army. That evening, Bud and several others returned to camp. Happy to see that his friend had recovered, Hiram greeted him enthusiastically, and the two exchanged stories of their exploits.

(Page 82)
“My sister, Jenny, told me that General Butler is chargin’ anyone who sings that song a twenty-five-dollar fine,” he declared as he entered, referring to the Union commander who was ruling New Orleans with an iron fist.

(Page 82)
“And the Unionists in town left with the Yankees, too. Reckon they were afraid of what might happen to them if they stayed.”

(Page 83)
General Pope bragged that his “headquarters were in the saddle,” but the Rebels teased that his headquarters were where his hindquarters ought to be. With the advent of September, Pope proved their philosophy was accurate by retreating back to Washington. General Jackson, in hot pursuit, soon caught up to the Union general. The Alabamians, who were trailing behind, heard the report of cannons ahead as Jackson and Pope confronted one another.

(Page 83)
On strict orders to respect the citizens, the Rebels were on their best behavior, and didn’t disturb anything. Upon entering Maryland, they received an icy reception, which was not at all what they had expected. The Marylanders heard from Union sympathizers in Europe that Lee expected to conscript all able-bodied men for his army, and even though that wasn’t the case, their sentiments were equally divided. Hiram overheard a few spectators, who were observing their march from open second-story windows, comment on how they couldn’t distinguish the generals from the enlisted men, because they were all in filthy tatters. General Lee ordered his regimental bands to play “Maryland, My Maryland.” His men cheered while they marched through, but they were later disappointed, for they were unable to successfully recruit enough soldiers to replenish their depleted ranks.

(Page 84)
Their reprieve was short-lived, for the next morning, September 14, they were ordered to hurriedly prepare rations and march back to Boonesborough Gap. The men learned that their sudden turnabout was due to a blunder made during the previous week. A copy of Confidential Special Order No. 191, wrapped around three cigars, was discovered by a Union soldier in Fredericktown, and given to General McClellan. The order outlined Lee’s intentions, so McClellan reacted by attempting to cut off the Confederate army, which was scattered from Harpers Ferry to Hagerstown. The Alabamians raced to the aid of General Hill, who was subjected to protecting the gap with his small army until reinforcements arrived.

(Page 86)
The Confederates advanced into the trees, skirmishing with their enemies as they drove them out. Captain Scruggs, who fell wounded, was quickly replaced by Captain Robbins. Realizing that they were at an advantage, the Rebels shot down scores of Yankees while concealing themselves in the cover of trees, fighting savagely despite their extreme hunger and fatigue. Other regiments of their brigade, the Texans, South Carolinians, and Georgians, were out in the open on their left, and suffered because of it. As dawn began to lighten the sky, Hiram noticed a Union general riding around the field on a large white horse.

(Page 86)
“That there’s Fightin’ Joe Hooker,” Lieutenant King informed him. “He’s makin’ himself an easy target, ain’t he?” The lieutenant laughed at the Union general’s absurdity.

(Page 87)
During the following days, reports came in that the battle was declared a draw, although General Lee pulled his troops back onto Confederate soil. The cornfield that the Alabamians had marched across was mowed down by bullets, as though cut with a scythe. The 4th Alabama came out better than most, with only eight dead and thirty-six wounded. Hood’s Texans lost nearly 80 percent of their troops, as well as their colors. The battle was the bloodiest single day since the war’s start, the casualties so excessive that both sides called a truce at one point to clear the field of their dead. One of those killed was Union General Phil Kearny, who had been close friends with A. P. Hill. Another was Bernie Kelton, the man who had volunteered to enlist in place of his brother. Hiram wondered how the brother would take hearing the news, once he learned that Bernie sacrificed his life for him. He felt a wave of pity for the new father who had lost his brother, and who most certainly would feel responsible. Dozier Downs had simply disappeared.

(Page 87)
Stories of young heroines who came to the mercy of wounded soldiers filled the warriors’ hearts with adoration. One such woman was referred to as the “Angel of the Battlefield.” Serving on the Union side during the recent battle, she dared to assist her fellow man in the midst of all the fighting. It was rumored that Miss Clara Barton narrowly escaped death herself.

(Page 87)
The Alabamians camped in the valley of the Opequon Creek, where they recuperated from their hard campaign. During their hiatus, the men received letters from home, discovering that ties had been restored, due to the departure of the Union army from north Alabama. They waited in anticipation to hear their names called out by Quartermaster George Washington Jones, and went up to answer the post. Hiram and Bud both received letters, and after reading to themselves, they shared them with one another.

(Page 88)
Two days later, on September 22, Abraham Lincoln announced his Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, freeing slaves in Confederate states, but not in Union or neutral states. No blacks were allowed into Lincoln’s home state of Illinois, and the president didn’t contest it. The Rebels thought him a hypocrite, since he was freeing slaves he had no control over, but the ones he had the power to liberate remained enslaved. Eight days later, the men learned that their beloved commander, Colonel McLemore, had died after a prolonged decline. The next day, they moved their camp to a location between Bunker Hill and Winchester, where they remained until the latter part of October, living on captured provisions and food they obtained from local farmers.

(Page 88)
On October 8, the Battle of Perryville took place, which was Kentucky’s only major battle thus far, between Union General Buell and Confederate General Braxton Bragg. Because the Republicans thought Buell was proslavery for wanting to protect Southerners’ property, he was relieved of his command. On October 9, General Longstreet was promoted to lieutenant general. A day later, so was General Jackson, and on that same day, General Stuart began his raid into Pennsylvania. The troopers rode up to Chambersburg, where they helped themselves to fresh horses and newly harvested fodder. They continued on around the Union army and returned to Virginia, completing Stuart’s second ride around McClellan.

(Page 91)
Glaring at him, Jake shook his head. “You know he’ll jist lie about bein’ in the Union army. His ma thinks he and Lemuel jined up with ole Braxton Bragg.”

(Pages 92-93)
Coming across a recent copy of Harper’s Weekly at the mercantile, David opened the publication to discover contents within it that alarmed, yet intrigued him. Inside the pages were engravings, copies of photographs that had been taken near Sharpsburg by a photographer named Alexander Gardner. Even though they were drawings, the pictures were disturbing nevertheless, and depicted crumpled corpses slumped together like potato sacks, laid out in front of a small white building, along with broken caissons, dead mules, overturned limbers, and more pictures of Confederate bodies. It seemed to him that there were no deceased Union soldiers lying about in any of the pictures. Although he knew his father wasn’t among the casualties, he was still appalled by the drawings. He had seen photos of corpses post mortem before, but nothing as horrendous as the mangled bodies of slain soldiers left rotting on the ground with dead horses. Setting the newspaper down, he came to the conclusion that his mother had to somehow be prevented from seeing them. It was apparent that the distant battles in Virginia were getting closer all the time, which he found somewhat distressing.

(Page 95)
A few days later, David learned that Owen had indeed returned to Morgan County, so devising a plan, he summoned his courage. The pistol that the Union officer had dropped when he shot him with an arrow was stashed in Caroline’s top dresser drawer, but he knew where to find it. Attempting to be inconspicuous, he tucked it under the waistband of his trousers, and set off to confront his adversary. After riding for almost an hour, he recognized the small shotgun house, sitting in a glen off to the side of the road, so he turned Renegade onto the path leading up to it. The cabin looked similar to his own family’s dogtrot, but smaller and more run-down. A mangy mutt trotted out from under the house to meet him, forced a guttural growl, and slinked back to its haven-hole. David dismounted. A cold gust of wind blew through him, making him shiver. He looked over at the lifeless windows.

(Page 96)
“She already knows we was fightin’ for the Union, if that’s what you mean.”

(Page 97)
They waited for Burnside to pounce, but their wait was long-lived, for he hesitated. Since the men were required only to attend dress parade and roll call, they idled away their time by staging snowball fights, some so zealous that several soldiers were wounded, and a few were killed. They also spent time exploring the town, as well as the terrain north of camp. Fredericksburg had been nearly evacuated, except for a few citizens who still remained, because their only other option was to camp in the snowy woods until danger passed. On a few rare occasions, the 4th Alabama was detailed to picket duty in town, where they stayed inside deserted homes that housed fine paintings, extensive libraries, and lovely furniture, or they stood guard outside on the piazzas, and in the immaculate sculptured gardens, gazing across the river at the Union soldiers’ tents. They noticed how finely outfitted the Yankees were in their splendid blue uniforms, but the Confederates, in contrast, were clothed in ragged, tattered, dingy butternut.

(Page 98)
On several occasions, Hiram heard music float across the river. The Yankee bands played new songs he had never heard before. One sounded like “John Brown’s Body,” but the words had been changed. This, he learned, was the Union army’s new anthem, “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” He didn’t appreciate the lyrics, since they equated the Confederates to devils, but listened with interest, nonetheless. Another Yankee song they played repetitively was called the “Battle Cry of Freedom.” He liked that one better, but it still didn’t make his spirit soar like “Dixie” did. The Federals played “The Star-Spangled Banner” and “Hail Columbia,” songs the Southerners once held dear, and waited for Confederate bands to reply, but no reprisal came. As if reading Hiram’s mind, the Yankees rambunctiously played “Dixie’s Land.” Men on both sides of the river burst into cheers, which fell away to mutual laughter.

(Page 98)
At dawn on December 11, the Rebels’ heavy artillery report sounded the alarm: two shots fired in quick succession signaled the Union army’s advance across the river. The 4th fell out and took their position in line. They heard heavy firing down in the town and learned that McLaws’ Division was shooting at the Yankees to prevent them from constructing pontoon bridges.

(Page 98)
At sunup, the North Alabamians awoke to hear Federal bands playing, and the Union infantrymen scuffling about while they moved, but he couldn’t see anything, due to heavy fog. The 4th marched back to their previous position, where they discovered brisk skirmishing and artillery fire taking place. Burnside had begun harassing the Confederates but was unable to accomplish anything.

(Page 101)
The men awoke to find it was raining, as it usually did after a battle. They discovered that Burnside’s Federals had crossed the river overnight, demoralized into retreating to Washington. A wave of cheers rushed over the Rebel ranks. While the rain dissipated to drizzle, Bud, who was still in a daze, followed some of his comrades out onto the battlefield, which was covered with dead Yankee soldiers. It was obvious from what they saw that the Union army had suffered almost complete annihilation. Some of the Federals died trying to use their comrades’ bodies as shields. What it must have been like to lie in wait while bullets thudded into the bodies of their friends, Bud could only speculate. Besides corpses dressed in blue, some wore Zouave uniforms, while others adorned their trappings with Kelly green. Blue Hugh said they were with the Irish Brigade, because he had heard that they wore green boxwood sprigs in their caps to display their heritage. The barefoot Confederates immediately set to work, relieving the rigid bodies of their footwear and clothing, as well as their haversacks’ contents. Bud replaced his worn-out brogans, which had developed holes in their soles long ago.

(Page 101)
He nudged the Union soldier with the barrel of his gun, and the foursome ambled off.

(Page 102)
It had stopped raining, but bitter cold replaced it. Upon returning to camp, Bud and his comrades learned that they had lost five, with seventeen wounded. Their regiment didn’t fire a single shot. The Yankees, it was estimated, lost over nine thousand after making fourteen assaults that were all beaten back. The men heard of one brave soul, Sergeant Kirkland of South Carolina, who acquired a reputation as the “Angel of Marye’s Heights” for crossing enemy lines and benevolently tending to the Union wounded by providing them with blankets and water. John Pelham, an Alabama son who was in charge of Jackson’s artillery, received praise from General Lee for bravely executing an effective barrage by deceiving the Yankees into thinking his numbers were far greater than they actually were, and holding their lines in the process.

Search result for 'Union' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 1: Chapter One
"...In his opinion, it had all started two years ago and had escalated from there. First was John Brown’s raid, followed by his hanging. After that came Lincoln’s election, and now, one by one, Southern states were seceding. His own beloved Alabama had been the fourth to leave the Union only a month ago. Since then, three more states had disaffiliated. The country was splitting in two. A slight breeze blew by, causing him to shiver from the cold February chill. He forced himself to listen once again. ..."
"...“There can be but little rivalry between ours and any manufacturin’ or navigatin’ community, such as the Northeastern States of the American Union,” said the president-elect. “It must follow, therefore, that mutual interest would invite goodwill and kind offices. If, however, passion or the lust of dominion should cloud the judgment or inflame the ambition of those states, we must prepare to meet the emergency and maintain, by the final arbitrament of ..."
146.
"... plant, in Latin words, it read, “Noli Me Tangere,” or “Touch Me Not.” Kit Lawrence, a childhood friend of David’s father, protested. “We should support the Union by not takin’ up arms,” he growled. “Why in God’s name would we support the Yankees,” said Mr. Skidmore, ..."

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Chapter 3: Chapter Three
"...On the following day, May 6, Arkansas seceded from the Union, and on the following day, the 4th Alabama was inducted into Confederate service, mustered in for the duration of one year. Following several days of idleness, the recruits embarked yet again via train to Strasburg, Virginia, arriving on May 11. The weather had become partly cloudy, to the men’s ..."
"...During the month of May, the Confederacy’s capital moved from Montgomery to Richmond, and another southern state, North Carolina, seceded. Hiram learned that the reason for his regiment’s relocation was because Union forces had moved into Virginia and seized Alexandria, which was nearly seventy miles away. Although the situation seemed to be worsening, strangely enough, visitors from Huntsville steadily arrived to see their boys, bringing gifts and letters. Citizens from home temporarily took their own places in the ranks as privates, ..."
79.
"... declaration seemed to quell the 4th Alabama’s discontentment, at least for the time being. May gave way to June, and a week later, Tennessee seceded from the Union. Bud didn’t hesitate to bring it to Hiram’s attention. “I wonder if Kit, Kit, chicken crap will jine up ..."
92.
"... prepared for the fight. Sweet heart please keep us in your upmost prayers. Give our daughters a kiss for me and tell David not to fret about the heat. Know that my love for you is endless. If the Union keeps procrastinating this war should be over in a matter of days. All my ..."
"...News came that Union General George B. McClellan had driven the Confederates out of the Allegheny Mountains, thus bringing the western portion of Virginia under U.S. control. By doing so, he secured himself a nickname, “Little Napoleon.” A short time later, it was reported that the U.S. Sanitary Commission had been founded by ..."
100.
"... colonel. By mid-July, the Union Army finally began to move, and on Thursday, July 18, the Alabamians received orders to strike tents and cook two days’ rations in preparation for a march. The sick, who were principally suffering from the measles, were left behind in Winchester. While the ..."
"...It wasn’t long before the Yankees came into view: their appearance seemed surreal. The men of the 4th Alabama were confronted with the entire advancing Union Army. As they neared, the regiments on either side of the North Alabamians fell away. Colonel Jones ordered his men to hold fast their line of defense while he had them march up a hill to a low fence surrounding a cornfield. ..."
"...For some reason, the Union Army ceased firing at noon. Bracing themselves for another attack, the Rebels utilized the time to check their firearms. Word came that artillery was running low, which caused a slight panic, but Jones assured his men that they could win the battle before their ammunition ran out. ..."
"...After two hours of quiet, the Yankees resumed their assault, and the Confederates fought off several Union advances. Men in colorful garb fashioned after French Algerian Zouaves attacked first, but were driven back. Then came, one at a time, three other regiments, but all eventually broke and ran. Their uniforms caused confusion, for men on either side were dressed in both blue and gray, including Colonel ..."
"...in the leg, forcing Colonel Jones to dismount. In a hail of bullets, he too was hit in both thighs, and crumbled to the ground with a broken left leg. Law immediately took command, managing to retire his troops, but was compelled to leave Jones on the field because Union soldiers had forded Bull Run River. Major Scott went down, shot through the leg. Law fell next, his arm broken by a Yankee’s bullet, and was quickly taken from the field. The remaining Alabamians now had no one to guide them. They stood in mass confusion while men writhed ..."
"...an invalid old woman by the name of Judith Carter Henry. Unable to leave her bed, she had been riddled with bullets. The Federals were commanded by Brigadier General Irvin McDowell. Generals Johnston and Beauregard of the Confederacy had proven themselves a worthy foe, and apparently had defeated the Union soldiers. Hiram and his comrades hoped that, by showing their mettle, they would bring a rapid end to the conflict, thus winning their right to secede. ..."

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Chapter 5: Chapter Five
"...President Lincoln appointed his “Little Napoleon,” George McClellan, to the position of general-in-chief of all Union forces on November 1. This followed the resignation of Winfield Scott, a hero in the Mexican War, who had acquired the nickname “Old Fuss and Feathers,” but was now too old and too obese to continue in his current capacity. McClellan had graduated from West Point, in the same ..."
"...David pondered Mr. Ryan’s statement. The Union troops were encroaching, that much was certain. How close they would get was unknown, but it was still very unsettling. If they did come down to Alabama, he would have to invent a plan to preserve his family and possessions. Suddenly, he felt strangely alone and vulnerable, even though ..."

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Chapter 6: Chapter Six
"...The 4th Alabama received word that Stonewall Jackson had attacked Union forces in the Shenandoah Valley, forcing the Yankees to rush back to Washington and defend the city from a possible Confederate attack. They also learned that Nathan Bedford Forrest’s men were on the move in Tennessee, and great concern arose over the possible invasion of Alabama by Union troops. ..."
20.
"... resemble cannon snouts. With the advent of April, the Rebels were informed that McClellan was gathering his Union troops in preparation for a march on Richmond, and they knew it wouldn’t be long before they were called upon for defense. It was just a matter of time. David spent his ..."
"...courier. David eagerly hovered around Ben Johnson’s in anticipation of incoming telegrams, and while he was there, a courier rode in. According to the messenger, some twenty thousand troops were converging on the area, and the fighting was bloody. Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston had been killed, and the Union army had been chased back to Pittsburg Landing on the Tennessee River. From the looks of things, the Rebels were victorious, according to the dispatch rider, who immediately set off toward Huntsville to retrieve more information. Waving his hat in the air, he let out a whoop and rode ..."
27.
"... Yankee soldiers. Ormsby Mitchel’s Union army marched into undefended Huntsville early the following morning. Once David and Jake found out, they couldn’t wait to investigate, and they finally found the opportunity to sneak off early one crisp spring morning a week later. Devising a plan, ..."
"...homes for two nights, thus buying themselves extra time for their adventure. With Jake on Stella and David on Cotaco, they stealthily made their way up to Huntsville. Once they arrived at the outskirts of town the following day, they were awed by the spectacle that lay before them. Union soldiers were everywhere, like blue ants on a picnic, swarming about the city streets. No civilians were in sight. David and Jake tied their horses behind a shed half a mile out and headed into town. They slinked past sentries, cowered behind wagons, barrels, and buildings, and hid in ..."
"...the Conscription Act, which required all men aged eighteen years and older to enlist. Many felt the law was a contradiction to state sovereignty, which was what the Confederacy had been founded on. Newspapers reported that Fort Pulaski, located at the mouth of the Savannah River, had fallen, and Union forces captured it by using rifled cannon. They also printed that, on April 12, what was being called the “Great Locomotive Chase” took place. Several Federal volunteers had attempted to steal the Confederate locomotive General, but were discovered as they headed north from Big Shanty, Georgia. The Confederate crew ..."
"...The situation was worsening in Huntsville, as Union soldiers went on a rampage. Their commander, Ormsby Mitchel, turned a blind eye to his soldiers’ pilfering. Federal gunboats patrolled up and down the Tennessee River, shelling towns and settlements along the banks. The Yankees burned, plundered, and foraged from the poor displaced souls, and raiding parties became more ..."
"...cobalt sky, birds began twittering in the trees. He arrived at the Kimballs’, and once Jake saddled up, they were on their way, traveling through intermittent sprinkles, bedding down that evening in a makeshift shelter, and continuing on until they arrived at the Tennessee River. To their dismay, several Union pickets were stationed at the bridge. ..."
163.
"... a small cloud of dust. “It is him!” Jake said in amazement. A few of the Federals heard his voice. They turned to look, but David and Jake quickly backed into the shadows to avoid being detected. The Union soldiers filed past. “I told you!” David whispered. The company marched off down ..."

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Chapter 7: Chapter Seven
14.
"... “It’s ironic, too,” Mr. Powell interjected, “because Athens flew the stars and stripes longer than the rest of the state in protest for not havin’ secession submitted to the popular vote. They wanted to stay in the Union, and now they’re bein’ attacked by it.” “The ..."
"...The following morning, they learned that a regiment of Union soldiers had gotten ahead of them in an attempt to cut them off. General Whiting, the brigade commander, galloped past them on his steed, his hands clasped and his face raised to the sky in prayer while he rode to the front. Later on in the day, General Hood ..."
"...Inexplicably, Union forces backed off, so the Rebels were able to continue on unmolested until they reached the outskirts of Richmond. They camped there for three weeks. During that time, the men managed to obtain news that on May 15, the CSS Alabama had been launched from England, and five days ..."
"...The Alabamians learned that Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson had been victorious in Winchester, driving General Nathaniel P. Banks’ Union forces north, and had captured scores of Yankee soldiers, as well as their supply wagons. Because of it, the Rebels were referring to the Union general as “Commissary” Banks. Hiram happily contrived a song about their revered general that soon caught on in camp. ..."
"...After a while, the 4th Alabama became restless, with nothing to break up the monotony of their inactivity, except for their artillery, which fired halfheartedly at the Union army’s observation balloon. Hiram’s messmates expressed their discontent about being idle as well, and Blue Hugh complained the most, living up to his nickname. Hiram expected the man’s cynicism to dissipate once spring set in, but instead, Blue Hugh just became more sarcastic. ..."
"...the following morning, the Alabamians traveled eight miles to the beat of their drums toward Seven Pines and their foe. The Stars and Bars, St. Andrews Cross, the regimental colors, and the Bonnie Blue Flag all flew gallantly above the advancing Confederates. Once they arrived, they saw that the Union army had been driven out, for all that remained were their empty tents. Throughout the course of the day, the 4th was maneuvered to different locations, but still didn’t see any fighting. By evening, they had been placed on the Richmond and York River railroad tracks. The empty camp ..."
"...As soon as the men took their position, the Union soldiers opened fire. The Alabamians were forced to endure an unmerciful bombardment, since no other regiment appeared to support them. While they lay in wait, tolerating the shelling, General Johnston slowly rode up to them. He sat upon his mount, staring off at the advancing Union army. Suddenly, a ..."
"...the regiment was on open ground, it moved at twilight toward the cover of trees and the abandoned Yankee camp, but before the men reached their refuge, another shell exploded in their midst, killing several. Agonized screams pierced the air, and the survivors yelled and cursed as they fled. Union soldiers advanced toward them in the dark. Their voices carried across the field, so the Alabamians could tell they were being pursued. Hiram and his comrades turned and fired upon their adversaries. The Yankees returned the volley. Fighting continued for several minutes until the Federals retired. ..."
"...saddened to learn that one of the casualties was Gus Mastin, the color bearer for the Huntsville Guards. The same silk flag that had been given to him during the presentation ceremony, featuring the name of the Huntsville Female College, had been taken from his lifeless body by a Union soldier. ..."
"...who were being referred to as his “Seven Immortals,” became more active in their attempts to aggravate General Mitchel in Huntsville. At McDavid’s Mill, they captured four sutlers’ wagons and ninety-six bales of cotton that Northern buyers were preparing to ship north. They also made several attacks on the Union garrison at the railroad bridge over Flint River. On one occasion, they killed a Federal soldier and captured another. Annoyed with their constant harassment, the Union army burned the town of Whitesburg to the ground in retribution. Local businessman, “Uncle” Billy Ryan, distributed supplies to Gurley and his men, ..."
"...entering, the boys saw that it was still abandoned, so they confined their mares, and walked down to the river’s edge. The canoe was right where they had left it nearly two months ago. They paddled across, tied the boat, and set off on foot. Noticing a group of Union soldiers nearby, they took cover in some scrub oaks and waited until the bluecoats walked off. Finally, the boys arrived in Huntsville, but the town seemed deserted of civilians. Only Union soldiers occupied the streets. ..."
111.
"... they were unarmed. “We’re here to enlist!” hollered Jake. David glared at him. The picket approached, saw they were harmless, and relaxed his weapon. “You boys want to fight for the Union army?” “Yessir. That’s right,” said Jake. He elbowed his friend, who hesitantly ..."
166.
"... or Frank Gurley without them,” Jake reasoned. “Your mothers know about this?” “Why, of course they do!” Jake exclaimed. “We want to do our part by preservin’ the glorious Union!” “Is your brother, Lemuel, a Yankee, too?” David asked. Leering at them, Owen said, ..."

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Chapter 8: Chapter Eight
"...On June 17, General Lee sent the 4th Alabama and Hood’s Texans to the Shenandoah Valley to support Stonewall Jackson, while Union General McDowell was ordered to defend Washington against Jackson’s advance. Hiram’s regiment marched 150 miles, and was allowed to rest for only one day during the journey. Eight days later, the men bivouacked near Ashland, twelve miles from Richmond. Circling around McClellan’s army, they were now behind it. The ..."
"...red-winged blackbirds, while they flitted above in the shimmering leaves. He could hear soldiers singing behind him, as well as the echoes of clomping boots and horses’ hooves. The dew-covered grass smelled fresh and clean. At 10:00 a.m., the Rebels reached a bridge that had been partially destroyed by Union pickets, who were now on the opposite side, felling trees to impede them. ..."
"...of fine bay horses pulled up. The driver realized too late that he was in the midst of the enemy. Soldiers piled into the ambulance, relieving the driver of any foodstuffs he had. Soon the road was cleared, the men marched on, and the stunned driver, who was with Union General Porter’s corps, was taken prisoner. ..."
"...They advanced across. The stench of smoke and sulfur rose up to meet them as they fell victim to the waiting Union artillery and small guns. The roar was nearly deafening, and several men fell screaming to their deaths while the regiment progressed. Smoke was so thick and suffocating that the Rebels choked and coughed. They could barely see ten feet in front of them, but they knew they had to ..."
"...The Confederates jumped into the Union breastworks, stampeding like cattle. In response, the Federals broke and ran as the Alabamians thundered up the ascent to the second line of defense. The Yankees from the first line swept through the second, and all turned tail. The Rebels kept shrieking, cursing, and running in pursuit. They attacked ..."
16.
"... On June 29, the Rebels crossed the bridge and followed the retreating Union army to Malvern Hill, where McClellan made a stand. The 4th Alabama was subjected to heavy artillery fire while they supported their batteries, until darkness fell, when they were forced to endure a heavy thunderstorm. ..."
"...The Union army was far superior in numbers and rations, although McClellan had been fooled into thinking otherwise. The Rebels realized that they had an enormous task before them, but they were willing to accept the challenge, because they adored “Bobby” Lee and Colonel Law. Their loyalty ran deep, even though ..."
"...Union sympathizers arrived in Decatur and made it their mission to report Rebels who were hiding in the hills. Union Colonel Abel Streight decided to pursue the offenders, so he took a regiment of infantry and one company of cavalry into the mountains to hunt them down. The cavalry was ..."
31.
"... riders came to a stop in front of her. “Ma’am,” one of them said, touching the brim of his kepi, “we’ve been sent to scout the area, and if you have anything the Union army deems necessary, it is our lawful right to confiscate it.” He started to dismount, but she cocked the ..."
35.
"... either side of her, baring their teeth and growling menacingly. “We beg to differ, ma’am,” the other Union soldier said cordially. “We don’t want any trouble, but if you make a fuss, we’ll have to send for assistance.” “Git off my land! You hear?” David was startled awake at ..."
"...Suddenly, his eyes bulged in horrified shock. He grasped the shaft in his side. Another arrow flew through the air past Caroline, making a whispering sound as it traveled, and seated itself into the other Union soldier’s thigh. Before he could react, one more arrow flew by the first Yankee. Another pierced through the second man’s forage cap. ..."
"...The following afternoon, just as he was about to conclude that it was safe to bring his family home, a band of Union cavalrymen thundered up the lane. Hearing the horses’ pounding hooves announce their arrival, he hid in the safety of the trees, watching and waiting while he held his breath in anticipation. The men dismounted. They walked into the house and around the premises. To his amazement, they mounted back ..."
"...General Lee’s Confederates spent July and the first part of August recuperating. Jackson moved to Gordonsville, where he encountered Pope, and deceived the Union general by lighting numerous fires to make his forces appear larger than they were. This stratagem proved effective, because Pope retreated, but not before Jackson captured a portion of his army. Meanwhile, the 4th Alabama repositioned from Richmond to Gordonsville to support Jackson. After spending three months in Richmond, ..."
"...across the Rapidan River toward Culpeper Court House. Pope discovered their advance, so he withdrew across the Rappahannock. Once the Rebels arrived, the people of Culpeper came out to greet them, cheering and waving flags in welcome. Some told horror stories of how they had been abused by Pope’s Union army. Others described how Pope’s own men despised him because of his arrogant, pompous nature, and how Pope’s bombastic braggadocio deflated his troops’ morale. ..."
"...Jackson’s corps crossed the Rappahannock in an attempt to flank the Union army, while General Lee’s portion stayed behind to keep Pope occupied. The Alabamians learned of Jackson’s departure a few days later, but didn’t flinch in their determination. The fact that they were immensely outnumbered didn’t deter them. ..."
94.
"... while they passed, referring to the popular, melancholy song. Information about the dead man filtered back through the ranks, and it was discovered that he was actually a Union spy who had paid for his infraction with his life. Late that evening, the corps’ two brigades were positioned to ..."
97.
"... sucking on a lemon as he sat atop Little Sorrel. The Confederates continued to drive the Yankees until they were close, and then waited for their artillery to arrive. Once positioned on the field, the cannons exploded into the Union soldiers. The men were forced to tolerate heavy artillery ..."
"...railroad cut. They retaliated by firing into them. The two opposing forces clashed in hand-to-hand combat until the Yankees finally retreated. Pope marched out one column after another, only to have each one repelled. Jackson’s men used all of their ammunition, so they had to fight off the advancing Union soldiers by hurling rocks. The 4th Alabama continued to observe until they were called upon, along with General Longstreet’s men, to support Jackson. They rushed to his rescue, and the Yankees were finally forced to retreat, leaving their dead and dying on the field. All the while, artillery from ..."
"...in the Federals’ haste to depart, he was left behind. The Confederates were fed better rations than they had been given since leaving Richmond. Musicians in Hiram’s company, Foggarty, Halsey, and Hickey, celebrated the victory by playing Irish music with instruments they found abandoned on the battlefield by the Union army. That evening, Bud and several others returned to camp. Happy to see that his friend had recovered, Hiram greeted him enthusiastically, and the two exchanged stories of their exploits. ..."
118.
"... the “Bonnie Blue Flag.” “My sister, Jenny, told me that General Butler is chargin’ anyone who sings that song a twenty-five-dollar fine,” he declared as he entered, referring to the Union commander who was ruling New Orleans with an iron fist. David straightened from mucking ..."
136.
"... now it’s called the Huntsville Confederate.” “That seems right fittin’.” “And the Unionists in town left with the Yankees, too. Reckon they were afraid of what might happen to them if they stayed.” “That’s understandable.” David hesitated, letting the news sink in. He ..."

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Chapter 9: Chapter Nine
"...Pope bragged that his “headquarters were in the saddle,” but the Rebels teased that his headquarters were where his hindquarters ought to be. With the advent of September, Pope proved their philosophy was accurate by retreating back to Washington. General Jackson, in hot pursuit, soon caught up to the Union general. The Alabamians, who were trailing behind, heard the report of cannons ahead as Jackson and Pope confronted one another. ..."
"...On strict orders to respect the citizens, the Rebels were on their best behavior, and didn’t disturb anything. Upon entering Maryland, they received an icy reception, which was not at all what they had expected. The Marylanders heard from Union sympathizers in Europe that Lee expected to conscript all able-bodied men for his army, and even though that wasn’t the case, their sentiments were equally divided. Hiram overheard a few spectators, who were observing their march from open second-story windows, comment on how they couldn’t distinguish the generals from ..."
"...morning, September 14, they were ordered to hurriedly prepare rations and march back to Boonesborough Gap. The men learned that their sudden turnabout was due to a blunder made during the previous week. A copy of Confidential Special Order No. 191, wrapped around three cigars, was discovered by a Union soldier in Fredericktown, and given to General McClellan. The order outlined Lee’s intentions, so McClellan reacted by attempting to cut off the Confederate army, which was scattered from Harpers Ferry to Hagerstown. The Alabamians raced to the aid of General Hill, who was subjected to protecting the gap with ..."
"...concealing themselves in the cover of trees, fighting savagely despite their extreme hunger and fatigue. Other regiments of their brigade, the Texans, South Carolinians, and Georgians, were out in the open on their left, and suffered because of it. As dawn began to lighten the sky, Hiram noticed a Union general riding around the field on a large white horse. ..."
48.
"... field, but the white horse still remained visible. “That there’s Fightin’ Joe Hooker,” Lieutenant King informed him. “He’s makin’ himself an easy target, ain’t he?” The lieutenant laughed at the Union general’s absurdity. Yankee artillery fired into General Hood’s right ..."
"...Texans lost nearly 80 percent of their troops, as well as their colors. The battle was the bloodiest single day since the war’s start, the casualties so excessive that both sides called a truce at one point to clear the field of their dead. One of those killed was Union General Phil Kearny, who had been close friends with A. P. Hill. Another was Bernie Kelton, the man who had volunteered to enlist in place of his brother. Hiram wondered how the brother would take hearing the news, once he learned that Bernie sacrificed his life for him. He ..."
"...Stories of young heroines who came to the mercy of wounded soldiers filled the warriors’ hearts with adoration. One such woman was referred to as the “Angel of the Battlefield.” Serving on the Union side during the recent battle, she dared to assist her fellow man in the midst of all the fighting. It was rumored that Miss Clara Barton narrowly escaped death herself. ..."
"...The Alabamians camped in the valley of the Opequon Creek, where they recuperated from their hard campaign. During their hiatus, the men received letters from home, discovering that ties had been restored, due to the departure of the Union army from north Alabama. They waited in anticipation to hear their names called out by Quartermaster George Washington Jones, and went up to answer the post. Hiram and Bud both received letters, and after reading to themselves, they shared them with one another. ..."
"...Two days later, on September 22, Abraham Lincoln announced his Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, freeing slaves in Confederate states, but not in Union or neutral states. No blacks were allowed into Lincoln’s home state of Illinois, and the president didn’t contest it. The Rebels thought him a hypocrite, since he was freeing slaves he had no control over, but the ones he had the power to liberate remained enslaved. Eight days later, ..."
"...On October 8, the Battle of Perryville took place, which was Kentucky’s only major battle thus far, between Union General Buell and Confederate General Braxton Bragg. Because the Republicans thought Buell was proslavery for wanting to protect Southerners’ property, he was relieved of his command. On October 9, General Longstreet was promoted to lieutenant general. A day later, so was General Jackson, and on that same day, General ..."
204.
"... ain’t under Yankee rule. He can’t do nothin’ to me.” Glaring at him, Jake shook his head. “You know he’ll jist lie about bein’ in the Union army. His ma thinks he and Lemuel jined up with ole Braxton Bragg.” “Well, maybe it’s time we set the record straight.” Jake ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
"...they were drawings, the pictures were disturbing nevertheless, and depicted crumpled corpses slumped together like potato sacks, laid out in front of a small white building, along with broken caissons, dead mules, overturned limbers, and more pictures of Confederate bodies. It seemed to him that there were no deceased Union soldiers lying about in any of the pictures. Although he knew his father wasn’t among the casualties, he was still appalled by the drawings. He had seen photos of corpses post mortem before, but nothing as horrendous as the mangled bodies of slain soldiers left rotting on the ground ..."
"...A few days later, David learned that Owen had indeed returned to Morgan County, so devising a plan, he summoned his courage. The pistol that the Union officer had dropped when he shot him with an arrow was stashed in Caroline’s top dresser drawer, but he knew where to find it. Attempting to be inconspicuous, he tucked it under the waistband of his trousers, and set off to confront his adversary. After riding for almost an ..."
76.
"... your ma here?” “No. Why?” “Because I wanted to tell her how you and Lemuel turned traitor.” “She already knows we was fightin’ for the Union, if that’s what you mean.” “You’re lyin’.” Owen grinned. “So what if I am? What business is it of yours, anyway?” He ..."
"...a few rare occasions, the 4th Alabama was detailed to picket duty in town, where they stayed inside deserted homes that housed fine paintings, extensive libraries, and lovely furniture, or they stood guard outside on the piazzas, and in the immaculate sculptured gardens, gazing across the river at the Union soldiers’ tents. They noticed how finely outfitted the Yankees were in their splendid blue uniforms, but the Confederates, in contrast, were clothed in ragged, tattered, dingy butternut. ..."
"...On several occasions, Hiram heard music float across the river. The Yankee bands played new songs he had never heard before. One sounded like “John Brown’s Body,” but the words had been changed. This, he learned, was the Union army’s new anthem, “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” He didn’t appreciate the lyrics, since they equated the Confederates to devils, but listened with interest, nonetheless. Another Yankee song they played repetitively was called the “Battle Cry of Freedom.” He liked that one better, but it still didn’t make ..."
"...At dawn on December 11, the Rebels’ heavy artillery report sounded the alarm: two shots fired in quick succession signaled the Union army’s advance across the river. The 4th fell out and took their position in line. They heard heavy firing down in the town and learned that McLaws’ Division was shooting at the Yankees to prevent them from constructing pontoon bridges. ..."
"...At sunup, the North Alabamians awoke to hear Federal bands playing, and the Union infantrymen scuffling about while they moved, but he couldn’t see anything, due to heavy fog. The 4th marched back to their previous position, where they discovered brisk skirmishing and artillery fire taking place. Burnside had begun harassing the Confederates but was unable to accomplish anything. ..."
"...to Washington. A wave of cheers rushed over the Rebel ranks. While the rain dissipated to drizzle, Bud, who was still in a daze, followed some of his comrades out onto the battlefield, which was covered with dead Yankee soldiers. It was obvious from what they saw that the Union army had suffered almost complete annihilation. Some of the Federals died trying to use their comrades’ bodies as shields. What it must have been like to lie in wait while bullets thudded into the bodies of their friends, Bud could only speculate. Besides corpses dressed in blue, some wore ..."
186.
"... “Because he’s always brung me luck.” “Not this time!” responded his captor with a laugh. He nudged the Union soldier with the barrel of his gun, and the foursome ambled off. It had stopped raining, but bitter cold replaced it. Upon returning to camp, Bud and his comrades learned ..."
"...The Yankees, it was estimated, lost over nine thousand after making fourteen assaults that were all beaten back. The men heard of one brave soul, Sergeant Kirkland of South Carolina, who acquired a reputation as the “Angel of Marye’s Heights” for crossing enemy lines and benevolently tending to the Union wounded by providing them with blankets and water. John Pelham, an Alabama son who was in charge of Jackson’s artillery, received praise from General Lee for bravely executing an effective barrage by deceiving the Yankees into thinking his numbers were far greater than they actually were, and holding their ..."

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"The history is intertwined ingeniously into the plot. It is well plotted and the narrative moves along at nice clip...."

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