A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'Yankee' mean?

Find out what Yankee means. Yankee is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Yankee

A northern soldier or sympathizer: someone loyal to the Federal government of the United States. Also known as a Union and Federal soldier.

In A Beautiful Glittering Lie, the term "Yankee" is used, and sometimes in a negative way, since the main characters are Southern. Examples of the word "Yankee" are as follows:

(Pages 4-5)
“I reckon he’s referrin’ to the fact that Northern tyranny has suppressed us here in the South,” Jenny’s husband, Nate, said softly, giving an affirmative nod. “And if the Yankees don’t allow us to leave peaceably, we’ll take up arms if we have to.”

(Page 13)
“By electin’ Ole Abe, the Yankees made a declaration of war,” said Bud.

(Page 17)
“As I was sayin’, Caroline,” his father continued, “the president sounds like he means business. He ain’t takin’ no muck off the Yankees.”

(Page 17)
His sister, Rena, glared at him. “You’re fixin’ to go fight the Yankees? Did Pa say you could?”

(Page 17)
“I’ll have none of it,” Caroline announced, rising as she took up empty plates. “You’re much too young to go gallivantin’ off to chase Yankees.”

(Page 19)
“Why in God’s name would we support the Yankees,” said Mr. Skidmore, “when all they want is to take away our livelihoods and privileges?”

(Page 19)
“We should all sign up now, put those Yankees in their place, and git on back home before harvest,” said Bud.

(Page 20)
“Those damn Yankee nigger lovers will pay dearly!” proclaimed Mr. Copeland.

(Page 26)
“Ma, there ain’t gonna be a war. We’ll whip the Yankees good, and it’ll all be over before harvest. Least that’s what Jake’s pa says.”

(Page 29)
“My ole flintlock. It shoots straight enough to hit a few Yankees.”

(Page 37)
“I’m jist so proud of my Bud for wantin’ to go off and fight those Yankees,” Mrs. Samuels gushed.

(Pages 43-44)
Jake ran outside with David at his heels. They jumped onto their horses and kicked them to go. To David’s surprise, Sally broke into a canter, easily passing Jake’s aged mare. He reached the decrepit, rundown farm first. While he waited for Jake to catch up, he looked around at the deteriorating outbuildings, the neglected, overgrown fields, and the dark, empty house. The thought occurred to him that the Yankees could attack and take away everything they owned. His farm might someday look just as derelict. A shiver ran down his spine. He shook it off, thinking his imagination was run-ning away with him. The Yankees come down here? he thought. That’ll never happen. Our army will whip them before they ever git the chance. Jake neared the farmhouse, so David dismounted, all the while teasing his best friend.

(Pages 64-65)
George cleared his throat. “Old Abe is the greatest fool that I have ever heard of.” The men chortled. “If he had good sense, he could see that the South could not be coerced. We are all united as one man, and can whip any lot of Yankees on equal terms. It is useless for them to wage war on us, for we can defy the world if they invade us.”

(Page 65)
“Each one of us can whip ten Yankees!” laughed James Alexander.

(Page 65)
Hiram smiled at the young men’s zeal. He glanced at Bud, who rolled his blue eyes while grinning with amusement. Their excitement was catching: Hiram felt their fervor as well. He hoped the Yankees would see they meant business, turn tail, and run. Perhaps the war would be just a farce, and fizzle out after all.

(Page 68)
Within a few weeks, the soldiers became disenchanted with their new colonel, for he rigorously sent them through routine drills, and relentlessly imposed discipline that the North Alabamians found repetitious and boring. Anxious to fight the Yankees, they grew resentful of the monotony forced upon them, and were concerned about Jones’ lack of fighting experience while he was in the Mexican War. Their disgruntlement led to a petition passed around camp that called for Jones’ resignation.

(Page 68)
During the month of May, the Confederacy’s capital moved from Montgomery to Richmond, and another southern state, North Carolina, seceded. Hiram learned that the reason for his regiment’s relocation was because Union forces had moved into Virginia and seized Alexandria, which was nearly seventy miles away. Although the situation seemed to be worsening, strangely enough, visitors from Huntsville steadily arrived to see their boys, bringing gifts and letters. Citizens from home temporarily took their own place in the ranks as privates, readying for the fight, but the Yankees failed to appear. Rumors of the Federals’ impending advances proved to be false.

(Page 72)
While the men marched through town, women, old men, and children came out to see them, calling, “Please don’t leave us to the Yankees!”

(Page 73)
It wasn’t long before the Yankees came into view: their appearance seemed surreal. The men of the 4th Alabama were confronted with the entire advancing Union Army. As they neared, the regiments on either side of the North Alabamians fell away. Colonel Jones ordered his men to hold fast while he had them march up a hill to a low fence surrounding a corn field.

(Pages 74-75)
Glancing at his comrades, Hiram took a moment to catch his breath. The situation at hand was dangerous, yet dreamlike. He had envisioned this moment for months, and had discussed it with his fellow comrades. Still, the realization that it was actually taking place was difficult to comprehend. His heart was beating so hard that it felt like it was in his throat. He glanced at Bud, whose face was blackened from powder. Obviously concentrating with all his might, Bud continued to jump to his feet, fire, and fall down again while grimacing. Men around them fell with thuds like acorns from oak trees. Bullets whizzed all around them, sounding like angry wasps. Some whistled and ricocheted, haphazardly hitting and missing men as they screamed, moaned, and cursed the wretched Yankees.

(Page 75)
Just as he took aim with his rifle, a Yankee bullet penetrated his skull. He fell in a heap, his brains splattered onto the field. Bud glanced at Hiram, shook his head in dismay, and kept firing like nothing had happened. Stunned, Hiram forced himself to shake it off, continuing to fight as well.

(Page 75)
After two hours of quiet, the Yankees resumed their assault, and the Confederates fought off several Union advances. Men in colorful garb fashioned after French Algerian Zouaves attacked first, but were driven back. Then came, one at a time, three other regiments, but all eventually broke and ran. Their uniforms caused confusion, for men on either side were dressed in both blue and gray, including Colonel Jones, who wore the blue uniform he had donned while previously serving in the U.S. Army.

(Page 76)
The 4th Alabama was finally flanked. As the regiment was commanded to retire, James Alexander fell, a bullet piercing his abdomen, sending his entrails splattering. Bud witnessed his terrible injury, but was unable to assist, and although in shock, he retreated with his regiment in a tornado of chaos. Old Battalion was hit in the leg, forcing Colonel Jones to dismount. In a hail of bullets, he too was hit in both thighs, and crumbled to the ground with a broken left leg. Law immediately took command, managing to retire his troops, but was compelled to leave Jones on the field because Union soldiers had forded Bull Run River. Major Scott went down, shot through the leg. Law fell next, his arm broken by a Yankee’s bullet, and was quickly taken from the field. The remaining Alabamians now had no one to guide them, and stood befuddled in mass confusion while men writhed around them on the ground, bloody and dying, as smoke and thunder filled the air.

(Page 79)
The Yankees fled northeast toward Washington, and in their chaos, became more panic-stricken, until their escape became a rout. The 4th Alabama, however, could only observe from a distance, since their exhaustion captivated them.

(Page 81)
Later in the day, President Davis rode at a gallop past the regiment on his way to the front. At sundown, the men found their way back, and rested in their bivouac, reflecting on the day’s events. They felt miserable about their performance, because they had turned their backs to the Yankees and retreated. The camp died down, with only the sounds of chirping crickets in the distance.

(Page 82)
It was learned that the white clapboard house at the center of the battle belonged to an invalid old woman by the name of Judith Carter Henry. Unable to leave her bed, she had been riddled with bullets. The Federals were commanded by Brigadier General Irvin McDowell. Generals Johnston and Beauregard of the Confederacy had proven themselves worthy foe, and apparently defeated the Union soldiers. Hiram and his comrades hoped that, by showing their mettle, they would bring a rapid end to the conflict, thus winning their right to secede. Soldiers from other regiments wandered into camp, describing the turmoil that had swirled around them. Brigadier General J.E.B. Stuart, Confederate cavalry commander, had hurled his cavaliers into the New York Zouaves, and as the Yankees retreated, all hell broke loose. Civilians from Washington City had driven over to witness the battle, bringing along their ladies, complete with picnic lunches, parasols, and fine carriages. However, when the Federals “skedaddled,” they almost killed the Washington elite. An artillery shell worsened the situation when it hit a wagon, clogging the road that had been their escape route. Congressman Healy was captured by the Confederates and taken prisoner. The Rebels were calling it the “Bull Run Races.”

(Page 89)
“No, Ma. I quit doin’ that.” He handed her the fish. Noticing the newspaper lying on the table, he gazed at the front page. “Governor Moore gave a speech about Pa’s regiment!” he exclaimed, and read on. “It says here that he praises the accomplishments of the 4th Alabama for chasin’ off four regiments of Yankees. And in return, the state legislature has given its official thanks and distinction for their remarkable display of cohesion and fightin’ ability. They’re heroes!” He grinned, and with a laugh, added, “They’re callin’ it the Great Skedaddle, because the Yankees ran away!”

(Page 92)
“Do you reckon they’ll run off to Yankeeland?” David asked in amazement.

(Page 95)
“Oh! So your pa is off fightin’ the Yankees!”

(Page 96)
“Don’t rightly know where we’re headed,” came the response. “We might stay close by. I hear there’s Yankees lurkin’ round every corner, and it won’t be long before they come around here, scrappin’ for a fight.”

(Page 132)
School resumed, but classes were intermittent, since the weather dictated participation and attendance. Josie brought home a new grammar book, which focused on the war effort and Confederate superiority over the Northern invaders. The new readers were also chock-full of anti-Yankee sentiment. David found them amusing, as did his little sister, although the propaganda they exuded was somewhat disturbing, in that they promoted the murder of Yankees.

(Page 134)
“It’s my understandin’ that Lincoln issued an order for Yankee forces to attack us on the birthday of our foundin’ father, George Washin’ton,” Mr. Skidmore told the gathering. “But it never happened. McClellan don’t have the courage to stand up to us!”

(Pages 134-135)
David pondered Mr. Ryan’s statement. The Union troops were encroaching, that much was certain. How close they would get was unknown, but it was still very unsettling. If they did come down to Alabama, he would have to invent a plan to preserve his family and possessions. Suddenly, he felt strangely alone and vulnerable, even though he knew he was surrounded by friends. His pa was too far away, and if Yankees came to the farm, none of his neighbors would be close enough to help, either. He had to find a way to fight them off by himself.

(Pages 138-139)
Out of sheer boredom, some infantrymen played practical jokes on their comrades. One such fellow, Enoch Campbell, whom Bud and Hiram had met upon their arrival into the army, was appointed barber. For his own personal entertainment, he would shave half of a patron’s face, and then walk off, leaving the other half unshaven. A few of the younger, more irresponsible men planted gunpowder near their messmates’ bedroll, finding great fun in exploding it while their friends lay sleeping, until they were severely reprimanded by their superiors. Some unruly soldiers were disciplined for their inadequate behavior by spending time in the “bullpen,” or guardhouse, and given just bread and water. Other offenders were paraded around camp to the tunes of “Yankee Doodle” and “Rough’s March,” wearing only barrels, with signs around their necks that read “liar” and “thief.” Several were ordered to carry out extra sentry duty, or were refused their pay, although the Confederacy had yet to reimburse any of its defenders.

(Page 141)
The 4th Alabama received word that Stonewall Jackson had attacked Union forces in the Shenandoah Valley, forcing the Yankees to rush back to Washington and defend the city from a possible Confederate attack. They also learned that Nathan Bedford Forrest’s men were on the move in Tennessee, and great concern arose over the possible invasion of Union troops into Alabama. A sig-nificant battle had taken place at Pea Ridge, Arkansas, with triumphant Union troops seizing control of the Missouri River. And at the mouth of the James River, the CSS Virginia, the first of its kind, being called an “ironclad,” met its equal with the Union’s ironclad, the USS Monitor. Both ships fired upon each other throughout the day of March 9, but neither was victorious. The Virginia was unable to penetrate and destroy the Union blockade.

(Page 143)
A few days later, on Thursday, April 10, Jake accompanied David to the mercantile, where they received terrible news. The Yankees had won the battle at Shiloh, forcing the defeated Confederates to retreat south. Rumor had it that the Federals were giving chase by also heading in their direction. The boys rode home to inform their parents, and all braced themselves for the worst, hiding valuables and preparing extra food, just in case they had to escape from invading Yankee soldiers.

(Page 144)
Devising a plan, they told their parents they were staying at each other’s homes for two nights, thus buying themselves extra time for their adventure. With Jake on Stella and David on Cotaco, they stealthily made their way up to Huntsville. Once they arrived at the outskirts of town the following day, they were awed by the spectacle that beheld them. Union soldiers were everywhere, like blue ants on a picnic, swarming about the city streets. No civilians were in sight. David and Jake tied their horses behind a shed half a mile out, and headed into town. They slinked past sentries, cowered behind wagons, barrels, and buildings, and hid in the cloak of shadows, making their way toward the Court House. As they crouched behind a cluster of budding shrubs in front of an enormous white Greek-revival house, peering out at a patrol of Yankees marching down the street, they muttered to each other in hushed tones.

(Page 145)
“What are you two doin’ lurkin’ round my mother’s rose bushes?” she asked, thrusting her fists onto her hips in obvious irritation. “I wish you Yankees would jist …”

(Page 145)
David and Jake threw glances at each other. “We ain’t Yankees!” exclaimed Jake. “Whatever gave you that notion?”

(Page 145)
She stared at them for a moment before her expression softened. “Oh, kind sirs. Beggin’ your pardon, but all I’ve been seein’ this past week is Yankees. I thought y’all might be out of uniform.”

(Page 145)
“No miss,” David said kindly. “We came up to Huntsville because we heard the Yankees took over the town.”

(Page 146)
“Have the Yankees caused y’all much trouble since they arrived?” he innocently inquired.

(Page 147)
Taking a sip, Jake complimented her in gentlemanly fashion, and asked, “When did the Yankees arrive? We heard it was last Friday.”

(Page 147)
“It all started with their takin’ the trains over at the depot,” she explained. “One train got away, but they wounded the poor nigger fireman. We were soon isolated, because the telegraph lines were cut. There were about a hundred and fifty wounded men on one train who had been at the battle at Shiloh, and the Yankees took them all prisoner. Can you imagine? Those poor boys already sufferin’, and along come the Federals to keep them from their medicine.”

(Page 147)
“They were kept in the depot for over a week, until those heathens finally decided to send them off to Yankee land, to wither away in some Godforsaken prison.”

(Page 148)
Emily shook her head in disgust. “Those brutes played ‘Yankee Doodle’ when they came into town.” She angrily scowled. “They marched in all their mud-splattered glory right past our house, and yonder to Court House Square. Some of them even had the audacity to gloat about our capture!”

(Page 149)
By the time they arrived at Jake’s, it was evening. As quickly and quietly as they could, they entered the warmth of the Kimball home. Without disclosing the details of their exploits, they hungrily devoured the meal Isabelle had prepared for them and hurried upstairs to Jake’s room, where they lay sprawled out on the bed, rehashing their excursion. They vowed to return the silver to Emily once the threat of Yankee invasion had passed, but when that would be, they couldn’t predict. The Yankees’ ominous occupation had arrived.

(Page 150)
Some of the soldiers managed to secure newspapers, which reported that Lincoln had been pressured to relieve Grant of his duties at Shiloh. The president was quoted as saying, “I can’t spare this man, he fights.” Therefore, Unconditional Surrender Grant still remained in command, and won the battle like Lincoln predicted. The president also signed into effect the abolition of slavery in the Yankee nation’s capital.

(Page 151)
The situation was worsening in Huntsville, as Union soldiers were given free reign. Their commander, Ormsby Mitchel, turned a blind eye to his soldiers’ pilfering. Federal gunboats patrolled up and down the Tennessee River, shelling towns and settlements along the banks. The Yankees burned, plundered, and foraged from the poor displaced souls, and raiding parties became more frequent. When David learned of the abomination, he considered joining up with a local group of Rebels who were retaliating. These guerrillas, as they were known, were a force to be reckoned with, for even though their group was small, they were fiercely lethal.

(Page 153)
“I heard the Yankees haven’t been able to cross the Tennessee on account of our fellers chasin’ them off,” Jake remarked, leaning back against the trunk.

(Page 154)
“Auburn has closed. It won’t reopen till the threat of Yankee invasion has passed.”

(Page 156)
Jake and David stood awkwardly, glancing over their shoulders to see if there were any Yankees approaching to pounce on them. After several minutes, Emily emerged.

(Page 157)
“Luckily, those Yankees haven’t been here to raid our pantry,” she said smugly. “My father is quite affluent, so I reckon they’re avoidin’ us because of it.”

(Page 157)
Miss Emily shook her head. “It’s been horrible,” she stated blatantly. “The Confederate soldiers who were hidin’ in town have all run off. My li’l’ brother and I can’t attend school, and the businesses have all closed. The Huntsville Democrat has been taken over, and those heathen Yankees have renamed it The Huntsville Reveille.”

(Page 157)
“They’ve moved into the train depot, the Female Seminary, and the Green Academy for boys,” Emily went on. “They’ve stolen and robbed from anyone they can, and they go out of their way to frighten us. They even steal from the poor niggers, who are learnin’ to hate those thievin’ Yankees as much as our Southern brethren do. The freed slaves come to the soldiers, who jist tear up their freedom papers, whip them, and send them back home.”

(Page 158)
“The Yankees decided that they’re tired of dealin’ with the niggers, so they merely shoot them when they approach,” she added. “They’ve shot several of the poor souls already.”

(Page 158)
“Well,” said Emily, “Reverend Ross allowed Mr. Samuel Coltart to hide his mule down in the furnace room of that church, so the Yankees wouldn’t steal it. Needless to say, durin’ the prayer, the mule started brayin’ like he was prayin’, too!”

(Page 158)
“It was. Till the Yankees had Dr. Ross arrested for offerin’ prayers for the success of the South.”

(Page 159)
Following suit, David said, “M’lady,” gave her a polite nod, flopped on his slouch hat, and sauntered after his friend. Turning back to see her standing in the doorway, he noticed the mournful expression on her pretty face, and felt his heart sink at the sight. Her predicament was disconcerting at the very least. He hoped the Yankees would leave her alone.

(Pages 159-160)
David and Jake glanced at each other, wondering if they were referring to Emily. Jake motioned for him to follow, so they slinked around the corner of a building, barely taking cover as another group of soldiers marched past. David gaped at the Yankees, not sure of what he was seeing.

(Page 160)
“What’s he doin’ jinin’ up with the Yankees?” Jake wondered out loud.

(Page 161)
“I still can’t believe we saw Owen with those Yankees,” panted Jake while they walked.

(Page 167)
“There has been a rumor floatin’ around that two hundred and fifty of our boys ambushed a Yankee detachment of infantry at Paint Rock Bridge,” said Mr. Skidmore. “But we all think General Mitchel invented that story to make his own men look good.”

(Page 168)
“Which fellers got arrested?” asked Kit, who had remained in Alabama since the Yankee invasion.

(Page 168)
“Not that you could anyway!” exclaimed Mr. Garrison. “Nothin’s goin’ in or out of Huntsville, thanks to those damn Yankees.”

(Page 168)
“They attacked Athens on the second,” informed Mr. Powell, referring to the nearby town. “Soldiers from Illinois came down from fightin’ at Shiloh, went in, and sacked the town. From what we were told, that Yankee Colonel Turchin walked into the town square and hollered out at his troops that he would shut his eyes for two hours. That gave them the go ahead to loot the town. They set fire to it, raped the servants, verbally abused the womenfolk, and pillaged the rest. They even caused one young lady to miscarry her baby, which resulted in both their deaths.”

(Page 169)
Ben Johnson shook his head in abhorrence while standing behind the counter. “If you ask me,” he said, “they ought to hold General Mitchel accountable. It’s intolerable for such terrible behavior to take place, even if they are Yankees.”

(Page 169)
“The Yankees are closin’ in, seems to me,” Mr. Foreman said stoically. “They’ve taken New Orleans, and God only knows what else will fall.”

(Page 171)
The following morning, they learned that a regiment of Union soldiers had gotten ahead of them in an attempt to cut them off. General Whiting, the brigade commander, galloped past them on his steed, his hands clasped, and his face raised to the sky in prayer while he rode to the front. Later on in the day, General Hood managed to push the Yankees back, prompting some of the men to comment on how General Whiting’s prayers had been answered. One of the North Alabamians, Orderly Sergeant Hartley, and a private from Company A, were sent out as scouts later that evening, but when morning came, only the private returned. Sergeant Hartley had been shot, and the private brought back his bullet-pierced roll book to prove it. Hiram and the rest of Company I once again felt remorse, for although Hartley had been from Connecticut, he was well liked, and a true Confederate patriot.

(Page 172)
The Alabamians learned that Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson had been victorious in Winchester, driving General Nathaniel P. Banks’ Union forces north, and had captured scores of Yankee soldiers, as well as their supply wagons. Because of it, the Rebels were referring to the Union general as “Commissary” Banks. Hiram happily contrived a song about their revered general that soon caught on in camp.

(Page 175)
Because the position of the regiment was on open ground, it was moved at twilight toward the cover of trees, and the abandoned Yankee camp, but before the men reached their refuge, another shell exploded in their midst, killing several. Agonized screams pierced the air, and the survivors yelled and cursed as they fled. Union soldiers advanced toward them in the dark. Their voices carried across the field, so the Alabamians could tell they were being pursued. Hiram and his comrades turned and fired upon their adversaries. The Yankees returned the volley. Fighting continued for several minutes until the Federals retired.

(Page 178)
David shook his head. “I don’t know, Jake. I heard at Ben Johnson’s mercantile that Captain Gurley has been causin’ trouble up that way, and the Yankees are all riled up about it.”

(Page 178)
“We won’t meet up with trouble. The Yankees are too busy frettin’ about ole Captain Gurley to give us any mind.”

(Page 179)
“Sure could go for a cup of coffee with this,” David remarked while he munched on a sandwich. Changing the subject, he said, “I heard at Ben Johnson’s that the Yankee Congress banned slavery in the western territories. The slave owners ain’t gettin’ paid, either. They have to give up their slaves, and the government won’t compensate them.”

(Page 179)
“That ain’t right,” remarked Jake. He took a deep swig of water from the flask he had brought along. “They should at least git paid for them. It’s like Pa says, if the Yankees would jist be willin’ to work with us, this war never would have happened.”

(Page 181)
“The house is full of Yankees!” David softly uttered in awe.

(Page 182)
“Those Yankees have been holdin’ their despicable dances, right in our houses. They’re makin’ their selves at home, and takin’ whatever they please,” said the first woman. “I can’t stand them!”

(Page 187)
“Is your brother, Lemuel, a Yankee, too?” David asked.

(Page 188)
“Well, we can’t wait to be Yankees, either!” Jake interjected cheerfully.

(Page 194)
Confederate General Whiting rode forward, and soon the bridge was repaired, enabling the men to cross. The Confederates shelled the woods to make sure no Yankees were waiting to ambush them, and then cautiously proceeded, clearing debris from their path while they forged ahead. Generals Ewell and A. P. Hill joined them, taking one road, and the Alabamians took another. On the 27th, they reached Cold Harbor, but only after considerable effort, because obstacles and sharpshooters hindered their progress.

(Pages 196-197)
The Confederates jumped into the Union breastworks, stampeding like cattle. In response, the Federals broke and ran as the Alabamians thundered up the ascent to the second line of defense. The Yankees from the first line swept through the second, and all turned tail. The Rebels kept shrieking, cursing, and running in pursuit. They attacked the third line that waited at the top of the hill. The Union soldiers panicked, and fell back, retreating at a run to avoid the charging Confederates, who fired a successful volley into the fleeing enemy. Before the Federals could remove their artillery pieces, the Rebels captured fourteen of them. As the Alabamians watched their enemies escape, their voices rose up in triumphant cheers, which spread through the ranks.

(Page 197)
Hiram stopped to catch his breath, watching the smoke clear. He looked around for Bud until he finally saw him walking toward him. The two congratulated each other amidst their shouting, jubilant comrades. As darkness fell, the Yankees escaped across the Chickahominy. General Lee was rewarded with his first victory, and the Confederates’ shock tactics had proven to be successful.

(Page 197)
It was discovered the following day that the 4th Alabama lost twenty-three, including Captain Armistead and Captain Price, and 109 were either wounded or missing. Jim Harrison of Company D received admiration for his ability to capture twenty-three men and an officer. In the excitement of battle, he had unintentionally jumped into a trench filled with Federals, so he shot one and took the rest prisoner. Among the Yankees captured by the Confederates was Colonel McLemore’s old regiment, the 8th U.S. Infantry, which he resigned from at the onset of the war.

(Page 199)
Orange Hugh received a gift of admiration from a young Richmond woman named Betsy. They had struck up a conversation one morning when she came to deliver clothing and food to the “orphans,” a nickname the North Alabamians had acquired because they were without correspondence from their loved ones, due to the Yankee occupation in northern Alabama. Betsy felt sorry for the young man, so she gave him a small white dog to keep him company, and to remind him of her. Orange named the canine Bo, and the two became inseparable.

(Page 200)
Colonel Turchin’s men had been having a field day in Athens. Aside from their uncontrolled outrages against the citizens, the Yankees singled out a slave named Matthew Gray. They forced Gray and a captured Confederate soldier to mount a mule, and after tying their feet together under the animal, they drove the mule into the Tennessee River. Fortunately for the victims, the mule swam to the other side, and the two men managed to free themselves instead of drowning, as was the intention. The townsfolk were ecstatic when Turchin was finally removed from command with his superior.

(Page 202)
“We don’t want no Yankees comin’ ‘round here!” she hollered at the top of her lungs, taking aim.

Page 202)
David startled awake at the sound of voices coming from beyond his bedroom window. He peered out around the curtain. “Yankees!” he said softly to himself. Springing from bed, he pulled on his trousers, quietly snuck out of his bedroom barefooted, and bolted to the barn.

(Pages 202-203)
Suddenly, his eyes bulged in horrified shock. He grasped the shaft in his side. Another arrow flew through the air past Caroline, making a whispering sound as it traveled, and seated itself into the other Union soldier’s thigh. Before he could react, one more arrow flew by the first Yankee. Another pierced through the second man’s forage cap.

(Page 204)
“Yankees were here,” he replied.

(Pages 204-205)
While he waited for his mother and sisters to dress, he rehashed the morning’s events until he could feel his loathing boil up inside him. The sight of those thieving Yankees infuriated him, so he made a resolution. He would protect his family at all costs. It was what his father would expect of him; it was what his father was doing right now. Clenching his jaw in conviction, he knew what he had to do. There was no way any damn Yankees were going to take what was rightfully his by inheritance. He would kill them all if he had to. He would fight to the death … but an alternative method, he realized, would probably be more effective.

(Page 205)
“We can hide our valuables in here until the Yankees are gone,” he explained.

(Page 205)
With no other alternative, Caroline agreed, so they spent the day transporting their livestock, silverware, the family Bible, and anything else they deemed valuable and could carry, to the cavern. In case the Yankees returned, they wouldn’t find anything worth salvaging. He had even devised a plan in case they torched the farm. His family would simply relocate into the McGovern house. He had spent the last two weeks tending to the abandoned property, making enough minor repairs so that it was somewhat livable, which wasn’t easy, since Caroline had been watching him like a hawk to ensure that he didn’t trot off to Huntsville again.

(Page 206)
As he rode to the cavern to collect his kin, he thanked God for His blessing, and for not allowing the Yankees to set fire to their home. He prayed over and over, hoping to reinforce his thankfulness, so that the Almighty would protect them, just in case they might need it again later.

(Pages 206-207)
August wore on. The summer days remained hot, dry, and muggy. David rode to the mercantile on the afternoon of the 9th, determined to inform his neighbors of his close encounter. However, some of them, he discovered, had already been visited by Yankee invaders. The men made a promise to protect each other’s property if it was in their power to do so, since the threat of Yankees, looters, and deserters was becoming more ubiquitous. Not surprisingly, Kit the coward had disappeared. Some protector, David thought to himself. Kit had always been unreliable, but still, it irritated him that the man volunteered to look after his family, when he knew Kit couldn’t be depended upon. He knew Kit knew it, too.

(Page 207)
“Yup. Billy Ryan says he was in a runnin’ fight with a large force of Yankee cavalry and got caught. They arrested him for the murder of that Yankee general, McCook, even though his death was an accident.”

(Page 207)
“To erect Yankee fortifications. From what I was told, they didn’t want to go, and more ran off and hid in the hills than went.”

(Page 207)
“It’s my understandin’ that the Yankees don’t want to fight for slavery. Most could care less,” informed Mr. Garrison. “If it comes down to that, they’ll quit and go home.”

(Page 209)
Two days later, the Rebels continued their pursuit of the Federals. They reached the Rappahannock, and moved up the river under constant shelling from their adversaries. The 4th Alabama was ordered to the front of the advancing Confederates. They charged, driving the Yankees into the river. As a result, many who couldn’t swim drowned, while others were killed or captured.

(Page 210)
Late that evening, the corps’ two brigades were positioned to advance through the narrow gap, which was only wide enough to allow for railroad tracks and a road. The steep, craggy sides prevented the Confederates from seeing in any direction but straight ahead. They chased the retreating Yankees, firing their rifles and muskets continuously while they pursued, the clatter of their guns echoing through the gap. The 4th was directed to climb the slope in an attempt to flank their retreating enemy, and after much difficulty, they succeeded at nightfall. The men bivouacked, where they sustained on hard tack and tobacco.

(Page 211)
The Confederates continued to drive the Yankees, until they were within close proximity, while they waited for their artillery to arrive. Once positioned on the field, the cannons exploded into the Union soldiers.

(Page 212)
The effusion of blood raged on. Jackson’s right brigade pressed the Yankees, and managed to capture one of their 3-inch rifles. At six o’clock, a large portion of the enemy’s artillery, as well as their infantry, started up the turnpike toward the Alabamians, who were ordered to charge. The Federals reacted by firing their artillery into the advancing Rebels. Members of Colonel Law’s brigade were blown to pieces, their appendages torn from their torsos, and their broken bodies hurled through the air. Blood splattered down like a rapid downpour, mixed with dirt and shrapnel. Several others were hit by flying metal, and screamed in agony as they writhed to the ground.

(Pages 212-213)
Men of the 4th Alabama ran hunched over, and reached the cover of a hill, where the belching cannons had no effect. Seeing that they were being overtaken, the Yankees fell back, but not before some members of the 4th managed to wrestle a sponge staff from one of the artillery gunners and take his Howitzer. The Alabamians continued pressing the Federals until darkness prevented further pursuit.

(Pages 213-214)
The Federals advanced a column of infantry out from the woods toward Jackson and his men, who lay in wait within a railroad cut. They retaliated by firing into them. The two opposing forces clashed in hand-to-hand combat until the Yankees finally retreated. Pope marched out one column after another, only to have each one repelled. Jackson’s men used all of their ammunition, so they had to fight off the advancing Union soldiers by hurling rocks. The 4th Alabama continued to observe, until they were called upon, along with General Longstreet’s men, to support Jackson. They rushed to his rescue, and the Yankees were finally forced to retreat, leaving their dead and dying on the field. All the while, artillery from both sides continued firing canister and grapeshot. Billowing smoke hung over the infantrymen as opposing sides shot at each other. Like the previous day, the Confederates again drove their enemies until nightfall prevented them.

(Page 215)
When Hiram questioned him, he explained that the general had fallen while trying to control Traveller, who had spooked. Bud then changed the subject, and went on to describe how he had stayed at the home of Miss Madeline Smith, who lived with her elderly parents. Lieutenant Colonel Scruggs, who had also fallen ill with fever, was staying at a nearby residence. Dr. Hudson had prescribed Fowler’s Solution to all of his patients, which Bud obediently guzzled down, despite the flavor. Miss Smith then told him about several hams she had hidden inside her chimney to protect against the marauding Yankees. She cheerfully invited him to partake in dinner with her once he was well, but alas, it was not to be, for Colonel Scruggs ordered the recuperated soldiers to return to duty.

(Page 216)
“I decided to stay close to home in case the Yankees come back again.”

(Page 216)
“Because last Sunday, the Yankees left Huntsville!”

(Page 217)
“And the Unionists in town left with the Yankees, too. Reckon they were afraid of what might happen to them if they stayed.”

(Page 223)
While they stood in waist-deep water, waiting for their clothes to dry, Bud said, “I don’t know if y’all have noticed, but it seems to me the Yankees jist don’t run out. They keep on comin’ like an endless tidal wave.”

(Page 224)
Around nine o’clock, the men were moved to outpost duty at a worm-and-hole fence, isolated from the rest of their regiment. Lieutenant Stewart directed them to draw back on their weapons in order to conserve ammunition. The Alabamians did their best to make themselves comfortable, although a drizzle had started, and the constant noise of moving caissons and artillery kept the hungry, exhausted Rebels awake. About an hour later, the sound of tramping boots came toward them. Captain Scruggs, who had replaced Colonel McLemore, gave the order to fire. Every gun exploded in a flash of fire at the same instant. The sounds of retreating footsteps and moaning wounded persisted for several minutes. After awhile, everything grew quiet again. Not even a cricket chirped, which Hiram and Bud agreed was spooky. Hiram sat in silence, straining to hear more Yankees approaching, his heart beating wildly with anticipation, and his breathing erratic.

(Page 227)
The Confederates advanced into the trees, skirmishing with their enemies as they drove them out. Captain Scruggs, who fell wounded, was quickly replaced by Captain Robbins. Realizing that they were at an advantage, the Rebels shot down scores of Yankees while concealing themselves in the cover of trees, fighting savagely with extreme hunger and fatigue. Other regiments of their brigade, the Texans, South Carolinians, and Georgians, were out in the open on their left, and suffered because of it. As dawn began to lighten the sky, Hiram noticed a Union general riding around the field on a large white horse.

(Pages 227-228)
Yankee artillery fired into General Hood’s right flank and rear, causing the Rebels to fall back. The ground was scattered with bodies, most of which were clad in blue. Many Confederate soldiers had exhausted their ammunition when Lieutenant Stewart informed that they had been fighting for nearly three hours straight. Fearing that the enemy would chase after them, they quickly reformed, but discovered their haste was unnecessary, as the Yankees failed to respond. The Alabamians took much needed time to replenish their ammunition and catch their breath.

(Page 232)
“Dear husband, mine says,” Bud proclaimed with a wide smile on his scraggly face. “The Yankees were finally chased off Sunday last on August thirty-first.” He glanced at his audience. “That’s been almost three weeks ago,” he stated.

(Page 233)
“Glad to hear it,” said Hiram. He produced his letter. “Mine says, dear Hiram. You will be happy to learn that we have been liberated from Yankee domination. We had a scare a month back, but your ingenious son found a way to distract the Yankees from our home. We are managin’ all right, but they took one of the hogs, and some of the chickens have disappeared. Mr. Skidmore was kind enough to give us a few lambs and pigs, but they are scrawny at best, and most likely won’t survive. I would like you to consider sellin’ your stallion for the well bein’ of your wife and children. Times are hard, and I am fretful the Yankees will steal him should they return. They have already secured my mare.” Hiram scowled with concern.

Search result for 'Yankee' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 1: Chapter One
37.
"... the platform. “I reckon he’s referrin’ to the fact that Northern tyranny has suppressed us here in the South,” Jenny’s husband, Nate, said softly, giving an affirmative nod. “And if the Yankees don’t allow us to leave peaceably, we’ll take up arms if need be.” A horse ..."
93.
"... percent of the popular vote, beating out their favorite, John C. Breckinridge, dominated their conversation. “By electin’ ole Abe, the Yankees made a declaration of war,” said Bud. “He wasn’t even on the ballot in ten states, all Southern, of course,” stated Hiram. “They burned him ..."
128.
"... your pardon, Ma,” he mumbled through his grits. “As I was sayin’, Caroline,” his father continued, “the president sounds like he means business. He ain’t takin’ no muck off the Yankees.” “Hiram!” she exclaimed. “I’ll not have you talkin’ like that ..."
132.
"... he declared. “So we’d best hold on tight.” “I’m all for the fight!” David hollered. His sister Rena glared at him. “You’re fixin’ to go fight the Yankees? Did Pa say you could?” “No, I did not,” Hiram responded. “I said I’d discuss it with your ma.” “I’ll have ..."
134.
"... not,” Hiram responded. “I said I’d discuss it with your ma.” “I’ll have none of it,” Caroline announced, rising as she took up empty plates. “You’re much too young to go gallivantin’ off to chase Yankees.” “But Ma!” David protested. “That’s all I’m sayin’ on ..."
147.
"... “We should support the Union by not takin’ up arms,” he growled. “Why in God’s name would we support the Yankees,” said Mr. Skidmore, “when all they want is to take away our livelihoods and privileges?” “I’m supportin’ the state, and the majority has voted for secession, ..."
151.
"... who lived in nearby Arab. “Why, I’ll be amazed if it lasts more than ninety days.” “We should all sign up now, put those Yankees in their place, and git on back home before harvest,” said Bud. Mr. Foreman looked up from the newspaper he had draped over the countertop. “It says here ..."
154.
"... so I can put this fire out before it gits any worse!” exclaimed Billy Ryan, who was Joseph’s cousin. “Those damn Yankee nigger lovers will pay dearly!” proclaimed Mr. Copeland. The gentlemen agreed boisterously by hollering, “Here! Here!” David glanced around at the gathering, ..."
216.
"... I only hope this war we’re headed into …” Her voice trailed off. “Ma, there ain’t gonna be a war. We’ll whip the Yankees good, and it’ll all be over before harvest. Least that’s what Jake’s pa says.” “Well, I hope he’s right.” She patted him on the knee, and stood. ..."
235.
"... don’t have a gun.” “I’m leavin’ you with the shotgun.” “What are you fixin’ to take?” “My ole flintlock. It shoots straight enough to hit a few Yankees.” The grin on his face made David smile back. “All right, Pa. I won’t let you down.” “And I have your ..."

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Chapter 2: Chapter Two
36.
"... mother and Mrs. Samuels converse beside them. Hiram and Bud rode up on the driver’s seat. “I’m jist so proud of my Bud for wantin’ to go off and fight those Yankees,” Mrs. Samuels gushed. David turned his focus toward what the men were saying. “That was a mighty nice ceremony,” ..."
"...surprise, Sally broke into a canter, easily passing Jake’s aged mare. He reached the decrepit, run-down farm first. While he waited for Jake to catch up, he looked around at the deteriorating outbuildings, the neglected, overgrown fields, and the dark, empty house. The thought occurred to him that the Yankees could attack and take away everything they owned. His farm might someday look just as derelict. A shiver ran down his spine. He shook it off, thinking his imagination was running away with him. The Yankees come down here? he thought. That’ll never happen. Our army will whip them ..."

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Chapter 3: Chapter Three
52.
"... of.” The men chortled. “If he had good sense, he could see that the South could not be coerced. We are all united as one man, and can whip any lot of Yankees on equal terms. It is useless for them to wage war on us, for we can defy the world if they invade us.” One of the men, George ..."
56.
"... hollered Matthew Curry, the farmer Hiram and Bud had previously been acquainted with from Lawrence County. “Each one of us can whip ten Yankees!” laughed James Alexander. “With one hand tied behind our backs!” added his cousin, William Rivers. Hiram smiled at the young men’s ..."
"...Hiram smiled at the young men’s zeal. He glanced at Bud, who rolled his blue eyes while grinning with amusement. Their excitement was catching: Hiram felt their fervor as well. He hoped the Yankees would see they meant business, turn tail, and run. Perhaps the war would be just a farce, and fizzle out after all. ..."
"...Within a few weeks, the infantrymen became disenchanted with their new colonel, for he rigorously sent them through routine drills, and relentlessly imposed discipline that the North Alabamians found repetitious and boring. Anxious to fight the Yankees, they grew resentful of the monotony forced upon them, and they were concerned about the colonel’s lack of fighting experience while he had served in the Mexican War. The soldiers’ disgruntlement led to their passing a petition around camp that called for Jones to resign. ..."
"...seized Alexandria, which was nearly seventy miles away. Although the situation seemed to be worsening, strangely enough, visitors from Huntsville steadily arrived to see their boys, bringing gifts and letters. Citizens from home temporarily took their own places in the ranks as privates, readying for the fight, but the Yankees failed to appear, and rumors of the Federals’ impending advances proved to be false. ..."
101.
"... were principally suffering from the measles, were left behind in Winchester. While the men marched through town, women, old men, and children came out to see them, calling, “Please don’t leave us to the Yankees!” The foot soldiers set off, marching throughout the day and all night, until ..."
"...It wasn’t long before the Yankees came into view: their appearance seemed surreal. The men of the 4th Alabama were confronted with the entire advancing Union Army. As they neared, the regiments on either side of the North Alabamians fell away. Colonel Jones ordered his men to hold fast their line of defense while he ..."
"...to jump to his feet, fire, and fall down again while grimacing. Men around them fell with thuds like acorns from oak trees. Bullets whizzed all around them, sounding like angry wasps. Some whistled and ricocheted, haphazardly hitting and missing men as they screamed, moaned, and cursed the wretched Yankees. ..."
111.
"... Just as he took aim with his rifle, a Yankee bullet penetrated his skull. He fell in a heap, his brains splattered onto the field. Bud glanced at Hiram, shook his head in dismay, and kept firing like nothing had happened. Stunned, Hiram forced himself to shake it off, continuing to fight as well. ..."
"...After two hours of quiet, the Yankees resumed their assault, and the Confederates fought off several Union advances. Men in colorful garb fashioned after French Algerian Zouaves attacked first, but were driven back. Then came, one at a time, three other regiments, but all eventually broke and ran. Their uniforms caused confusion, for men on either ..."
"...the ground with a broken left leg. Law immediately took command, managing to retire his troops, but was compelled to leave Jones on the field because Union soldiers had forded Bull Run River. Major Scott went down, shot through the leg. Law fell next, his arm broken by a Yankee’s bullet, and was quickly taken from the field. The remaining Alabamians now had no one to guide them. They stood in mass confusion while men writhed around them on the ground, bloody and dying. Smoke and thunder filled the air. ..."
138.
"... rivulets, but he said nothing. The Yankees fled northeast toward Washington, and in their chaos, became more panic-stricken, until their escape became a rout. The 4th Alabama, however, could only observe from a distance, since their exhaustion immobilized them. “Has anyone seen my cousin?” ..."
"...the day, President Davis rode at a gallop past the regiment on his way to the front. At sundown, the men found their way back, and rested in their bivouac, reflecting on the day’s events. They felt miserable about their performance, because they had turned their backs to the Yankees and retreated. The camp died down, with only the sounds of chirping crickets in the distance. ..."
"...Soldiers from other regiments wandered into camp, describing the turmoil that had swirled around them. Brigadier General J. E. B. Stuart, Confederate cavalry commander, had hurled his cavaliers into the New York Zouaves, and as the Yankees retreated, all hell broke loose. Civilians from Washington City had driven over to witness the battle, bringing along their ladies, complete with picnic lunches, parasols, and fine carriages. However, when the Federals “skedaddled,” they almost killed the Washington elite. An artillery shell worsened the situation when it hit a ..."

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Chapter 4: Chapter Four
"...He handed her the fish. Noticing the newspaper lying on the table, he gazed at the front page. “Governor Moore gave a speech about Pa’s regiment!” he exclaimed, and read on. “It says here that he praises the accomplishments of the 4th Alabama for chasin’ off four regiments of Yankees. And in return, the state legislature has given its official thanks and distinction for their remarkable display of cohesion and fightin’ ability. They’re heroes!” He grinned, and with a laugh, added, “They’re callin’ it the Great Skedaddle, because the Yankees ran away!” ..."
57.
"... toward the main house as David and Jake ducked behind a cluster of shrubs. Momentarily, Percy followed her. “Do you reckon they’ll run off to Yankee-land?” David asked in amazement. Jake shook his head and grinned. “Naw. At least, I hope not. No tellin’ what might happen to them if ..."
82.
"... Jones. Y’all ever heard of him?” “I have,” David volunteered. “He’s the commander of my pa’s regiment.” “Oh! So your pa is off fightin’ the Yankees!” “Yessir.” “Y’all considerin’ jinin’ up?” David flit a glance at his friend. “Not at present,” he said, ..."
99.
"... to Virginia?” David asked. “Don’t rightly know where we’re headed,” came the response. “We might stay close by. I hear tell there’s Yankees lurkin’ ’round every corner, and it won’t be long before they come here, scrappin’ for a fight.” “How long have you been ..."

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Chapter 5: Chapter Five
"...School resumed, but classes were intermittent, since the weather dictated participation and attendance. Josie brought home a new grammar book, which focused on the war effort and Confederate superiority over the Northern invaders. The new readers were also chock-full of anti-Yankee sentiment. David found them amusing, as did his little sister, although the propaganda they exuded was somewhat disturbing, in that they promoted the murder of Yankees. ..."
184.
"... why not.” “It’s my understandin’ that Lincoln issued an order for Yankee forces to attack us on the birthday of our foundin’ father, George Washin’ton,” Mr. Skidmore told the gathering. “But it never happened. McClellan don’t have the courage to stand up to us!” “Grant ..."
"...it was still very unsettling. If they did come down to Alabama, he would have to invent a plan to preserve his family and possessions. Suddenly, he felt strangely alone and vulnerable, even though he knew he was surrounded by friends. His pa was too far away, and if Yankees came to the farm, none of his neighbors would be close enough to help, either. He had to find a way to fight them off by himself. ..."

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Chapter 6: Chapter Six
"...while their friends lay sleeping, until they were severely reprimanded by their superiors. Some unruly soldiers were disciplined for their disruptive behavior by spending time in the “bullpen,” or guardhouse, and given just bread and water to sustain on. Other offenders were paraded around camp to the tunes of “Yankee Doodle” and “Rough’s March,” wearing only barrels, with signs around their necks that read “liar” and “thief.” Several were ordered to carry out extra sentry duty, or were refused their pay, although the Confederacy had yet to compensate any of its defenders. ..."
"...The 4th Alabama received word that Stonewall Jackson had attacked Union forces in the Shenandoah Valley, forcing the Yankees to rush back to Washington and defend the city from a possible Confederate attack. They also learned that Nathan Bedford Forrest’s men were on the move in Tennessee, and great concern arose over the possible invasion of Alabama by Union troops. A significant battle had taken place at Pea ..."
"...A few days later, on Thursday, April 10, Jake accompanied David to the mercantile, where they received terrible news. The Yankees had won the battle at Shiloh, forcing the defeated Confederates to retreat south. Rumor had it that the Federals were giving chase by also heading in their direction. The boys rode home to inform their parents, and all braced themselves for the worst, hiding valuables and preparing extra food, ..."
"...out and headed into town. They slinked past sentries, cowered behind wagons, barrels, and buildings, and hid in the shadows, making their way toward the courthouse. As they crouched behind a cluster of budding shrubs in front of an enormous white Greek-revival house, peering out at a patrol of Yankees marching down the street, they muttered to each other in hushed tones. ..."
38.
"... his body, taking a bow. “How may we be of service?” “What are you two doin’ lurkin’ ’round my mother’s rosebushes?” she asked, thrusting her fists onto her hips in obvious irritation. “I wish you Yankees would jist—” David and Jake threw glances at each other. “We ..."
40.
"... in obvious irritation. “I wish you Yankees would jist—” David and Jake threw glances at each other. “We ain’t Yankees!” exclaimed Jake. “Whatever gave you that notion?” She stared at them for a moment before her expression softened. “Oh, kind sirs, beggin’ your pardon, but ..."
41.
"... Jake. “Whatever gave you that notion?” She stared at them for a moment before her expression softened. “Oh, kind sirs, beggin’ your pardon, but all I’ve been seein’ this past week is Yankees. I thought y’all might be out of uniform.” “No, miss,” David said kindly. “We ..."
42.
"... been seein’ this past week is Yankees. I thought y’all might be out of uniform.” “No, miss,” David said kindly. “We came up to Huntsville because we heard the Yankees took over the town.” “Well, in that case, please do come in.” They followed her through the doorway, and ..."
45.
"... corner and wondered if the elegant swan in female form standing before him ever graced its ivories. “Have the Yankees caused y’all much trouble since they arrived?” he innocently inquired. She nodded mournfully. “That they have.” Unexpectedly, she let out a little sob. “Don’t ..."
55.
"... glasses. She set them on the table, filled each glass, and distributed them. Taking a sip, Jake complimented her in gentlemanly fashion and asked, “When did the Yankees arrive? We heard it was last Friday.” “Those beastly men!” Emily’s face turned red with frustration. “They are ..."
"...over at the depot,” she explained. “One train got away, but they wounded the poor nigger fireman. We were soon isolated, because the telegraph lines were cut. There were about a hundred and fifty wounded men on one train who had been at the battle at Shiloh, and the Yankees took them all prisoner. Can you imagine? Those poor boys already sufferin’, and along come the Federals to keep them from their medicines.” ..."
64.
"... they were!” “Yes, miss. We surely can,” David agreed. “They were kept in the depot for over a week, until those heathens finally decided to send them off to Yankee-land, to wither away in some Godforsaken prison.” “That’s right awful,” David sympathetically remarked. Emily ..."
"...Emily shook her head in disgust. “Those horrid rascals played ‘Yankee Doodle’ when they came into town.” She angrily scowled. “They marched right past our house in all their mud-splattered glory, and ended up yonder at Court House Square. Some of them even had the audacity to gloat about our capture!” ..."
"...devoured the meal Isabelle prepared for them and hurried upstairs to Jake’s room, where they lay sprawled out on the bed, rehashing their excursion. They vowed to return the silver to Emily once the threat of enemy invasion had passed, but when that would be, they couldn’t predict. The Yankee occupation had arrived. ..."
"...to relieve Grant of his duties at Shiloh. The president was quoted as saying, “I can’t spare this man; he fights.” Therefore, Unconditional Surrender Grant still remained in command, and he won the battle, as Lincoln predicted. The president also signed into effect the abolition of slavery in the Yankee nation’s capital. ..."
"...The situation was worsening in Huntsville, as Union soldiers went on a rampage. Their commander, Ormsby Mitchel, turned a blind eye to his soldiers’ pilfering. Federal gunboats patrolled up and down the Tennessee River, shelling towns and settlements along the banks. The Yankees burned, plundered, and foraged from the poor displaced souls, and raiding parties became more frequent. When David learned of the abomination, he considered joining up with a local group of Rebels who were retaliating. These guerrillas, as they were known, were a force to be reckoned with, for even ..."
91.
"... Spanish moss that hung from its branches to sway gently above them. “I heard the Yankees ain’t been able to cross the Tennessee on account of our fellers chasin’ them off,” Jake remarked, leaning back against the trunk. “I heard that, too. Reckon we’re lucky to be this far south, or ..."
111.
"... I’ve been meanin’ to tell you,” Caroline said as she arose. “What’s that, Ma?” he asked. “Auburn has closed. It won’t reopen till the threat of Yankee invasion has passed.” “Oh. Well, that’s all right,” he remarked with a shrug. “This will all be over by the time ..."
123.
"... looked them up and down. “Wait here.” He disappeared inside. Jake and David stood awkwardly, glancing over their shoulders to see if there were any Yankees approaching to pounce on them. After several minutes, Emily emerged. “It’s you!” she breathed. She reached out, took Jake by the ..."
128.
"... saw to it that their thirst and hunger were soon satisfied. “Luckily, those Yankees haven’t been here to raid our pantry,” she said smugly. “My father is quite affluent, so I reckon they’re avoidin’ us because of it.” “That’s a reassurance,” responded Jake. His gregarious ..."
"...Miss Emily shook her head. “It’s been horrible,” she stated blatantly. “The Confederate soldiers who were hidin’ in town have all run off. My li’l’ brother and I can’t attend school, and the businesses have all closed. The Huntsville Democrat has been taken over, and those heathen Yankees have renamed it the Huntsville Reveille.” ..."
"...moved into the train depot, the Female Seminary, and the Green Academy for boys,” Emily went on. “They’ve stolen and robbed from anyone they can, and they go out of their way to frighten us. They even steal from the poor niggers, who are learnin’ to hate those thievin’ Yankees as much as our Southern brethren do. The freed slaves come to the soldiers, who jist tear up their freedom papers, whip them, and send them back home.” ..."
135.
"... declared Jake, shaking his head in disgust. “The Yankees decided that they’re tired of dealin’ with the niggers, so they merely shoot them when they approach,” she added. “They’ve shot several of the poor souls already.” David and Jake looked at each other and frowned, for ..."
140.
"... soldiers there.” “Well,” said Emily, “Reverend Ross allowed Mr. Samuel Coltart to hide his mule down in the furnace room of that church, so the Yankees wouldn’t steal it. Needless to say, durin’ the prayer, the mule started brayin’ like he was prayin’, too!” The threesome ..."
143.
"... like he was prayin’, too!” The threesome giggled. “That is funny!” said Jake. “It was. Till the Yankees had Dr. Ross arrested for offerin’ prayers for the success of the South.” The boys groaned. “We saw where they burned some of the bridges and cattle guards on the way ..."
"...polite nod, flopped on his slouch hat, and sauntered after his friend. Turning back to see her standing in the doorway, he noticed the mournful expression on her pretty face, and felt his heart sink at the sight. Her predicament was disconcerting at the very least. He hoped the Yankees would leave her alone. ..."
"...David and Jake glanced at each other, wondering if they were referring to Emily. Jake motioned for his friend to follow, so they slinked around the corner of a building, barely taking cover as another group of soldiers marched past. Hesitating momentarily, David gaped at the Yankees, not sure of what he was seeing. ..."
166.
"... told you!” David whispered. The company marched off down the road until they were gone from sight. “What’s he doin’ jinin’ up with the Yankees?” Jake wondered out loud. “He’s a traitor!” exclaimed David. “And it don’t surprise me one bit.” Jake sighed. “Come on, ..."
170.
"... canoe had been tied to, secured the boat, climbed away from the river, and started along the road. “I still can’t believe we saw Owen with those Yankees,” panted Jake while they walked. “Are you fixin’ to tell Miss Callie?” David asked breathlessly. “I don’t reckon there’s ..."

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Chapter 7: Chapter Seven
1.
"... mercantile store. “There has been a rumor floatin’ around that two hundred and fifty of our boys ambushed a Yankee detachment of infantry at Paint Rock Bridge,” said Mr. Skidmore. “But we all think General Mitchel invented that story to make his own men look good.” David thought of ..."
5.
"... details from Billy Ryan, whose cousin snuck out of Huntsville and came down here to tell him.” “Which fellers got arrested?” asked Kit, who had remained in Alabama since the Yankee invasion. “Dr. Fearn is one,” replied Mr. Skidmore. “And Attorney William Acklen is another. He’s ..."
11.
"... was hopin’ it wasn’t anyone my brother and I do business with, is all.” “Not that you could anyway!” exclaimed Mr. Garrison. “Nothin’s goin’ in or out of Huntsville, thanks to those damn Yankees.” “They attacked Athens on the second,” Mr. Powell informed the men, ..."
"...“They attacked Athens on the second,” Mr. Powell informed the men, referring to the nearby town. “Soldiers from Illinois came down from fightin’ at Shiloh, went in, and sacked the town. From what we were told, that Yankee Colonel Turchin walked into the town square and hollered out at his troops that he would shut his eyes for two hours. That gave them the go-ahead to loot the town. They set fire to it, raped the servants, verbally abused the womenfolk, and pillaged the rest. They even ..."
13.
"... in both their deaths.” Ben Johnson shook his head in abhorrence while standing behind the counter. “If you ask me,” he said, “they ought to hold General Mitchel accountable. It’s intolerable for such terrible behavior to take place, even if they are Yankees.” “It’s ironic, ..."
15.
"... to stay in the Union, and now they’re bein’ attacked by it.” “The Yankees are closin’ in, it seems to me,” Mr. Foreman said stoically. “They’ve taken New Orleans, and God only knows what else will fall.” Uncontrollably, David shuddered. He glanced around at the solemn, ..."
"...of them in an attempt to cut them off. General Whiting, the brigade commander, galloped past them on his steed, his hands clasped and his face raised to the sky in prayer while he rode to the front. Later on in the day, General Hood managed to push the Yankees back, prompting some of the men to comment on how General Whiting’s prayers had been answered. One of the North Alabamians, Orderly Sergeant Hartley, and a private from Company A, were sent out as scouts later that evening, but when morning came, only the private returned. Sergeant Hartley had ..."
"...The Alabamians learned that Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson had been victorious in Winchester, driving General Nathaniel P. Banks’ Union forces north, and had captured scores of Yankee soldiers, as well as their supply wagons. Because of it, the Rebels were referring to the Union general as “Commissary” Banks. Hiram happily contrived a song about their revered general that soon caught on in camp. ..."
34.
"... once spring set in, but instead, Blue Hugh just became more sarcastic. “I wish we’d git to fightin’ so’s we could whip them Yankees and go on home,” Blue Hugh grumbled while the men cooked their midday meal. “Reckon we all wish that,” remarked Bud with a smirk. Blue Hugh ..."
"...Because the position of the regiment was on open ground, it moved at twilight toward the cover of trees and the abandoned Yankee camp, but before the men reached their refuge, another shell exploded in their midst, killing several. Agonized screams pierced the air, and the survivors yelled and cursed as they fled. Union soldiers advanced toward them in the dark. Their voices carried across the field, so the Alabamians could tell ..."
61.
"... to Huntsville and see what’s been goin’ on?” David shook his head. “I don’t know, Jake. I heard at Ben Johnson’s mercantile that Captain Gurley has been causin’ trouble up that way, and the Yankees are all riled up about it.” “So?” Jake grinned devilishly, his brown eyes ..."
64.
"... his brown eyes twinkling. “It might mean trouble for us, too,” said David. “We won’t meet up with trouble. The Yankees are too busy frettin’ about ole Captain Gurley to give us any mind.” Hesitating, David finally relented. “Okay. But you’re ridin’ home with me first ..."
"...“Sure could go for a cup of coffee with this,” David remarked while he munched on a sandwich. Changing the subject, he said, “I heard at Ben Johnson’s that the Yankee Congress banned slavery in the Western territories. The slave owners ain’t gettin’ paid, either. They have to give up their slaves, and the government won’t compensate them.” ..."
69.
"... them.” “That ain’t right,” remarked Jake. He took a deep swig of water from the flask he had brought along. “They should at least git paid for them. It’s like Pa says, if the Yankees would jist be willin’ to work with us, this war would never have happened.” “Reckon ..."
80.
"... back, his face pale, and his wide eyes clouding from hazel to dark umber. “What is it?” Jake whispered. “The house is full of Yankees!” David softly uttered in awe. They glared at each other for a second, and then ran as fast as they could, away from the dwelling. Once they ..."
89.
"... keep an eye on what’s goin’ on outside.” “Those Yankees have been holdin’ their vile dances in our houses. They’re makin’ their selves at home, and takin’ whatever they please,” said the first woman. “I can’t stand them!” “Come along, Tess,” the second woman coaxed. ..."
167.
"... of course they do!” Jake exclaimed. “We want to do our part by preservin’ the glorious Union!” “Is your brother, Lemuel, a Yankee, too?” David asked. Leering at them, Owen said, “He’s in my regiment.” “Well, we can’t wait to be Yankees, either!” Jake ..."
169.
"... brother, Lemuel, a Yankee, too?” David asked. Leering at them, Owen said, “He’s in my regiment.” “Well, we can’t wait to be Yankees, either!” Jake interjected cheerfully. Owen seemed convinced. “All right.” He pushed two sheets of paper across the table. “Sign these here ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 8: Chapter Eight
"...Confederate General Whiting rode forward, and soon the bridge was repaired, enabling the men to cross. The Confederates shelled the woods to make sure no Yankees were waiting to ambush them, and then they cautiously proceeded, clearing debris from their path while they forged ahead. Generals Ewell and A. P. Hill joined them, taking one road, and the Alabamians took another. On June 27, they reached Cold Harbor, but only after considerable effort, because obstacles ..."
"...The Confederates jumped into the Union breastworks, stampeding like cattle. In response, the Federals broke and ran as the Alabamians thundered up the ascent to the second line of defense. The Yankees from the first line swept through the second, and all turned tail. The Rebels kept shrieking, cursing, and running in pursuit. They attacked the third line that waited at the top of the hill. The Union soldiers panicked and fell back, retreating at a run to avoid the charging ..."
"...Hiram stopped to catch his breath, watching the smoke clear. He looked around for Bud until he finally saw him walking toward him. The two congratulated each other amidst their shouting, jubilant comrades. As darkness fell, the Yankees escaped across the Chickahominy. General Lee was rewarded with his first victory, and the Confederates’ shock tactics had proved to be successful. ..."
"...109 were either wounded or missing. Jim Harrison of Company D received admiration for his ability to capture twenty-three men and an officer. In the excitement of battle, he had unintentionally jumped into a trench filled with Federals, so he shot one and took the rest prisoner. Among the Yankees captured by the Confederates was Colonel McLemore’s old regiment, the 8th U.S. Infantry, which he had resigned from at the onset of the war. ..."
"...a gift of admiration from a young Richmond woman named Betsy. They had struck up a conversation one morning when she came to deliver clothing and food to the “orphans,” a nickname the North Alabamians had acquired because they were without correspondence from their loved ones, due to the Yankee occupation in north Alabama. Betsy felt sorry for the young man, so she gave him a small white dog to keep him company, and to remind him of her. Orange Hugh named the canine Bo, and the two became inseparable. ..."
"...Colonel Turchin’s men had been having a field day in Athens. Aside from their uncontrolled outrages against the citizens, the Yankees singled out a slave named Matthew Gray. They forced Gray and a captured Confederate soldier to mount a mule, and after tying their feet together under the animal, they drove the mule into the Tennessee River. Fortunately for the victims, the mule swam to the other side, and the ..."
29.
"... the front door to the porch. As the riders neared, she was able to make out their identities. “We don’t want no Yankees comin’ ’round here!” she hollered at the top of her lungs, taking aim. The riders came to a stop in front of her. “Ma’am,” one of them said, touching the brim ..."
37.
"... hear?” David was startled awake at the sound of voices coming from beyond his bedroom window. He peered out around the curtain. “Yankees!” he said softly to himself. Springing from bed, he pulled on his trousers, quietly snuck out of his bedroom barefooted, and bolted to the barn. “Now, ..."
"...Suddenly, his eyes bulged in horrified shock. He grasped the shaft in his side. Another arrow flew through the air past Caroline, making a whispering sound as it traveled, and seated itself into the other Union soldier’s thigh. Before he could react, one more arrow flew by the first Yankee. Another pierced through the second man’s forage cap. ..."
60.
"... do you mean?” Rena inquired. A rooster crowed from the henhouse, which aroused Caleb and Si’s curiosity, so they loped off. Yankees were here,” he replied. Rena gasped in reaction. “Don’t fret,” he assured her. “I have an idea. Go git changed, and I’ll show ..."
"...While he waited for his mother and sisters to dress, he rehashed the morning’s events until he could feel his loathing boil up inside him. The sight of those thieving Yankees infuriated him, so he made a resolution. He would protect his family at all costs. It was what his father would expect of him; it was what his father was doing right now. Clenching his jaw in conviction, he knew what he had to do. There was no way ..."
65.
"... already hitched to the wagon. David drove to the cave that he and Jake had discovered a year earlier. “We can hide our valuables in here until the Yankees are gone,” he explained. With no other alternative, Caroline agreed, so they spent the day transporting their livestock, silverware, ..."
"...With no other alternative, Caroline agreed, so they spent the day transporting their livestock, silverware, the family Bible, and anything else they deemed valuable and could carry to the cavern. In case the Yankees returned, they wouldn’t find anything worth salvaging. David had even devised a plan in case they torched the farm. His family would simply relocate into the McGovern house. He had spent the last two weeks tending to the abandoned property, making enough minor repairs so that it was somewhat ..."
69.
"... As he rode to the cavern to collect his kin, he thanked God for His blessing, and for not allowing the Yankees to set fire to their home. He prayed over and over, hoping to reinforce his thankfulness, so that the Almighty would protect them, just in case they might need it again later. ..."
"...The sweltering summer wore on. Every day remained hot and muggy. David rode to the mercantile on the afternoon of August 9, determined to inform his neighbors of his close encounter. However, some of them, he discovered, had already been visited by Yankee invaders. The men made a promise to protect each other’s property if it was in their power to do so, since the threat of Yankee soldiers, looters, and deserters was becoming more ubiquitous. Not surprisingly, Kit the coward had disappeared. Some protector, David thought to himself. Kit had always ..."
74.
"... responded Ben Johnson in alarm. “Yup. Billy Ryan says he was in a runnin’ fight with a large force of Yankee cavalry and got caught. They arrested him for the murder of that Yankee general, McCook, even though his death was an accident.” “Is that a fact?” asked Mr. ..."
78.
"... up north by train to Nashville,” Mr. Skidmore went on. “Why?” Ben asked. “To erect Yankee fortifications. From what I was told, they didn’t want to go, and more ran off and hid in the hills than went.” “It’s my understandin’ that the Yankees don’t want to fight for slavery. ..."
79.
"... more ran off and hid in the hills than went.” “It’s my understandin’ that the Yankees don’t want to fight for slavery. Most could care less,” Mr. Garrison informed the men. “If it comes down to that, they’ll quit and go home.” David stood silently listening, and thought of ..."
"...Two days later, the Rebels continued their pursuit of the Federals. They reached the Rappahannock, and moved upriver under constant shelling from their adversaries. The 4th Alabama was ordered to the front of the advancing Confederates. They charged, driving the Yankees into the river. As a result, many who couldn’t swim drowned, while others were killed or captured. ..."
"...Late that evening, the corps’ two brigades were positioned to advance through the narrow gap, which was only wide enough to allow for railroad tracks and a road. The steep, craggy sides prevented the Confederates from seeing in any direction but straight ahead. They chased the retreating Yankees, firing their rifles and muskets continuously while they pursued, the clatter of their guns echoing through the gap. The 4th was directed to climb the slope in an attempt to flank their retreating enemy, and after much difficulty, they succeeded at nightfall. The men bivouacked, where they sustained themselves ..."
97.
"... sucking on a lemon as he sat atop Little Sorrel. The Confederates continued to drive the Yankees until they were close, and then waited for their artillery to arrive. Once positioned on the field, the cannons exploded into the Union soldiers. The men were forced to tolerate heavy artillery ..."
"...The effusion of blood raged on. Jackson’s right brigade pressed the Yankees, and managed to capture one of their three-inch rifles. At six o’clock, a large portion of the enemy’s artillery, as well as their infantry, started up the turnpike toward the Alabamians, who were ordered to charge. The Federals reacted by firing their artillery into the advancing Rebels. Members of ..."
"...Quickening their pace, the men of the 4th Alabama ran hunched over, and reached the cover of a hill, where the belching cannons had no effect. Seeing that they were being overtaken, the Yankees fell back, but not before some members of the 4th managed to wrestle a sponge staff from one of the artillery gunners and take his howitzer. The Alabamians continued pressing the Federals until darkness prevented further pursuit. ..."
"...The Federals advanced a column of infantry out from the woods toward Jackson and his men, who lay in wait within a railroad cut. They retaliated by firing into them. The two opposing forces clashed in hand-to-hand combat until the Yankees finally retreated. Pope marched out one column after another, only to have each one repelled. Jackson’s men used all of their ammunition, so they had to fight off the advancing Union soldiers by hurling rocks. The 4th Alabama continued to observe until they were called upon, along with General ..."
"...also fallen ill with fever, was staying at a nearby residence. Dr. Hudson had prescribed Fowler’s Solution to all of his patients, which Bud obediently guzzled down, despite the flavor. Miss Smith then told him about several hams she had hidden inside her chimney to protect against the marauding Yankees. She cheerfully invited him to partake in dinner with her once he was well, but alas, it was not to be, for Colonel Scruggs ordered the recuperated soldiers to return to duty. ..."
123.
"... action. “Is this all you’ve been up to?” asked Jake. “I ain’t seen you around for purt near a week.” “I decided to stay close to home in case the Yankees come back.” Jake grinned. “I don’t reckon you’ll have to fret about that from now on.” “Why not?” “Because ..."
126.
"... come back.” Jake grinned. “I don’t reckon you’ll have to fret about that from now on.” “Why not?” “Because last Sunday, the Yankees left Huntsville!” David’s eyes grew wide in amazement. “They did?” “Yessiree. They jist up and left. General Braxton Bragg’s ..."
136.
"... now it’s called the Huntsville Confederate.” “That seems right fittin’.” “And the Unionists in town left with the Yankees, too. Reckon they were afraid of what might happen to them if they stayed.” “That’s understandable.” David hesitated, letting the news sink in. He ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 9: Chapter Nine
17.
"... and take much-needed baths. While they stood in waist-deep water, waiting for their clothes to dry, Bud said, “I don’t know if y’all have noticed, but it seems to me that the Yankees jist don’t run out. They keep on comin’ like an endless tidal wave.” Hiram dunked his head under ..."
"...in a flash of fire at the same instant. The sounds of retreating footsteps and moaning wounded persisted for several minutes. After a while, everything grew quiet again. Not even a cricket chirped, which Hiram and Bud agreed was spooky. They sat in silence, straining to hear if more Yankees were approaching. Hiram’s heart beat wildly with anticipation, and his breathing was erratic. ..."
"...The Confederates advanced into the trees, skirmishing with their enemies as they drove them out. Captain Scruggs, who fell wounded, was quickly replaced by Captain Robbins. Realizing that they were at an advantage, the Rebels shot down scores of Yankees while concealing themselves in the cover of trees, fighting savagely despite their extreme hunger and fatigue. Other regiments of their brigade, the Texans, South Carolinians, and Georgians, were out in the open on their left, and suffered because of it. As dawn began to lighten the sky, Hiram noticed ..."
"...Yankee artillery fired into General Hood’s right flank and rear, causing the Rebels to fall back. The ground was scattered with bodies, most of which were clad in blue. Many Confederate soldiers had exhausted their ammunition when Lieutenant Stewart informed them that they had been fighting for nearly three hours ..."
82.
"... with one another. “‘Dear husband,’ mine says,” Bud proclaimed with a wide smile on his scraggly face. “‘The Yankees were finally chased off Sunday last on August thirty-first.’” He glanced at his audience. “That was nearly three weeks ago,” he stated. “Keep readin’,” ..."
"...“Glad to hear it,” said Hiram. He produced his letter. “Mine says, ‘Dear Hiram. You will be happy to learn that we have been liberated from Yankee domination. We had a scare a month back, but your ingenious son found a way to distract the Yankees from our home. We are managin’ all right, but they took one of the hogs, and some of the chickens have disappeared. Mr. Skidmore was kind enough to give us ..."
"...The soldiers were eager to hear news about the war, and of battles that had taken place elsewhere. One such battle, an artillery fight at Little Bear Creek near Tuscumbia, Alabama, took place between Generals Roddey and Sweeny. After Roddey drove the Yankee invaders back to Corinth, Mississippi, he engaged the Federals at Barton Station, where he again drove them back. ..."
155.
"... “Did you hear about ole Abe Lincoln settin’ the darkies free?” “Why, yes, I did!” she exclaimed. “I do declare, when will those Yankees leave well enough alone and jist let us be?!” she huffed. “Makes me wonder if Jake’s niggers will run off.” “Well, ours already ..."
203.
"... to git back at him somehow.” “You’d best leave him be. He’ll have you arrested if you give him reason.” “We ain’t under Yankee rule. He can’t do nothin’ to me.” Glaring at him, Jake shook his head. “You know he’ll jist lie about bein’ in the Union army. His ma thinks ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
"...were taking place within both armies. As of November 10, Alabama had supplied over sixty thousand men to the Confederate cause. President Lincoln replaced McClellan yet again, this time with General Burnside, not so much because of Burnside’s performance at the recent Battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam as the Yankees were calling it, but because of his displayed abilities at First Manassas. Frustrated that “Little Napoleon” had refused to aggressively pursue and attack the Rebels by inaccurately assuming he was outnumbered, Lincoln was quoted as saying to him, “If you don’t want to use the army, I should like ..."
81.
"... Owen glared right through him, intimidating him like he always did. Feeling safer with the gun drawn, David pulled it back out. “I got this off a Yankee soldier,” he said, feeling the need to explain, “and I was fixin’ to tell your ma that it was yours, so she’d git upset.” The ..."
"...Hiram glanced around at his comrades, who were entrenched on either side of him, waiting for another Yankee advance. With time to reflect, he thought back to the previous month’s events. The 4th Alabama had abandoned their encampment for Culpeper Court House, and stayed there until November 22, when Lee discovered that Burnside was headed north from Richmond, so he assembled his troops near the quaint town ..."
"...to picket duty in town, where they stayed inside deserted homes that housed fine paintings, extensive libraries, and lovely furniture, or they stood guard outside on the piazzas, and in the immaculate sculptured gardens, gazing across the river at the Union soldiers’ tents. They noticed how finely outfitted the Yankees were in their splendid blue uniforms, but the Confederates, in contrast, were clothed in ragged, tattered, dingy butternut. ..."
"...On several occasions, Hiram heard music float across the river. The Yankee bands played new songs he had never heard before. One sounded like “John Brown’s Body,” but the words had been changed. This, he learned, was the Union army’s new anthem, “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” He didn’t appreciate the lyrics, since they equated the Confederates to devils, but ..."
"...the Rebels’ heavy artillery report sounded the alarm: two shots fired in quick succession signaled the Union army’s advance across the river. The 4th fell out and took their position in line. They heard heavy firing down in the town and learned that McLaws’ Division was shooting at the Yankees to prevent them from constructing pontoon bridges. ..."
"...At ten o’clock, the Yankees started to bombard the town, each of their 367 guns firing fifty rounds. From their position, Hiram and his comrades could see Fredericksburg set ablaze. Hysterical citizens ran out into the streets, scattering into the nearby woods. Although the weather was mild for December, Hiram knew that they would ..."
122.
"... The fog remained heavy until ten o’clock, when it lifted to reveal a wave of bluecoats moving across an open field. The Rebels watched the spectacle in awe. Tens of thousands of Yankees moved like a slithering blue serpent, sparkling with silver from sunlight glinting off their bayonets. ..."
"...shot, the Rebel guns immediately began their deadly work, pouring a storm of lead into the advancing foe, and they blew holes into the dark, solid columns, which were filled in like water rushing around a fractured dam. The thunderous salvos of cannonade shook the ground, retorted by the Yankees’ counter-barrage. The men in gray let loose a bloodcurdling Rebel yell and fired a storm of lead canister into the faces of their enemies as they approached, which was enough to send the bluecoats reeling. They stumbled, taking cover behind the bank. A line of colorful Zouaves passed them, ..."
"...fighting. Burnside reignited his attack in earnest at two o’clock by shelling another regiment of Rebels, who stood their ground in a sunken road behind a stone wall. One advance after another tried in vain to break the Confederate stance, but all were unable to penetrate the line. The Yankees marched up the hill until there were so many of their dead clogging the battlefield that the advancing Federals were unable to climb over them. The frozen ground in the sunken road gave way to mud and slush beneath the feet of hundreds of thrashing combatants. Some slipped and ..."
148.
"... could start up again.” He smiled. “I’ve outfoxed death twice in the past two days, and we’re holdin’ the Yankees at bay. Besides that, we’re at a vantage point. I reckon God is on our side.” He sauntered off behind the cover of the heights. Bud looked over at his fellow ..."
"...“I overheard two officers talkin’. One was ours, and one was theirs. As they was discussin’ the matters at hand, along comes ole Stonewall hisself, ridin’ right past them. Well, the Yankee officer says, ‘Who’s that?’ And our officer says, ‘Stonewall Jackson. Had you known who it was, no doubt you would’ve shot him.’ ‘Oh, no,’ says the Yankee officer. ‘I’m in favor of keepin’ him. We may, after whippin’ you, need him!’” ..."
152.
"... the winter campaign would be over. Suddenly, three bluecoats burst from the shrubs, shooting. Hiram cried out as he was hit, and he fell to the ground, writhing in agony. Another Yankee fired at Bud, who flinched as the bullet whizzed by his cheek. “Surrender now, seceshes!” one of the ..."
154.
"... seceshes!” one of the Federals commanded, using a slang term for secessionists. Before Bud could react, hot fire exploded behind him, and the Yankees fell back into the woods. He knelt to assist his friend. “Git up, Hiram!” he beseeched, his voice riddled with panic. Looking up at him ..."
"...that Burnside’s Federals had crossed the river overnight, demoralized into retreating to Washington. A wave of cheers rushed over the Rebel ranks. While the rain dissipated to drizzle, Bud, who was still in a daze, followed some of his comrades out onto the battlefield, which was covered with dead Yankee soldiers. It was obvious from what they saw that the Union army had suffered almost complete annihilation. Some of the Federals died trying to use their comrades’ bodies as shields. What it must have been like to lie in wait while bullets thudded into the bodies of their friends, ..."
178.
"... holes in their soles long ago. Blue Hugh found a young, handsome Yankee boy, lying dead amongst the others, and motioned Bud over. Inside his knapsack, they discovered chocolate and numerous love letters, which Blue Hugh began to read mockingly over the body. Bud snatched them from his hand. ..."
"...It had stopped raining, but bitter cold replaced it. Upon returning to camp, Bud and his comrades learned that they had lost five, with seventeen wounded. Their regiment didn’t fire a single shot. The Yankees, it was estimated, lost over nine thousand after making fourteen assaults that were all beaten back. The men heard of one brave soul, Sergeant Kirkland of South Carolina, who acquired a reputation as the “Angel of Marye’s Heights” for crossing enemy lines and benevolently tending to the Union wounded ..."
"...The Alabamians were told that Fredericksburg had been left in terrible condition. The Yankees were allowed to freely loot, ransack, burn, and pillage anything and everything, which infuriated the Rebels. Bud decided that the pity he had felt while on the battlefield was wasted. Those bastards don’t deserve my sympathy, he reasoned. The invaders caused too many innocents to suffer, and although they ..."
190.
"... grew about Europe’s possible renewed interest in supporting the Southern cause. “Since we whipped them infernal Yankees,” Enoch Campbell declared, “they might think differently about jinin’ us now.” Blue Hugh shook his head in disgruntlement but kept his conflicting opinion to ..."

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