A Beautiful Glittering Lie
One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

What does 'zouave' mean?

Find out what zouave means. Zouave is explained by J D R Hawkins - author of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

zouave

(pronounced zoo-ahv or zwahv) A zouave regiment was notable by what each soldier wore: a bright red shirt, baggy blue trousers, a vest, a yellow waist sash, and an oriental-type hat, called a fez. The uniforms were fashioned after French Algerian Zouaves. One of the first casualties of the war, Elmer Ellsworth, was a member of the New York Zouaves.

In my novel, A Beautiful Glittering Lie, the term "zouave" is used as follows:

(Page 61)
Almost immediately, voting began to determine who would lead what was now known as the 4th Alabama Infantry Regiment, consisting of fourteen hundred men and ten companies: the Governor’s Guards and the Magnolia Cadets from Dallas County, the Tuskegee Zouaves from Macon County, the Canebrake Rifles of Perry and Marengo Counties, the Conecuh Guards from Conecuh County, Marion Light Infantry of Perry County, the Lauderdale Guards of Lauderdale County, the Huntsville Guards and North Alabamians from Madison County, and the Larkinsville Guards from Jackson County. The regiment included men from all walks of life, from planters and clergymen to lawyers and physicians.

(Page 75)
After two hours of quiet, the Yankees resumed their assault, and the Confederates fought off several Union advances. Men in colorful garb fashioned after French Algerian Zouaves attacked first, but were driven back. Then came, one at a time, three other regiments, but all eventually broke and ran. Their uniforms caused confusion, for men on either side were dressed in both blue and gray, including Colonel Jones, who wore the blue uniform he had donned while previously serving in the U.S. Army.

(Page 82)
Soldiers from other regiments wandered into camp, describing the turmoil that had swirled around them. Brigadier General J.E.B. Stuart, Confederate cavalry commander, had hurled his cavaliers into the New York Zouaves, and as the Yankees retreated, all hell broke loose. Civilians from Washington City had driven over to witness the battle, bringing along their ladies, complete with picnic lunches, parasols, and fine carriages. However, when the Federals “skedaddled,” they almost killed the Washington elite. An artillery shell worsened the situation when it hit a wagon, clogging the road that had been their escape route. Congressman Healy was captured by the Confederates and taken prisoner. The Rebels were calling it the “Bull Run Races.”

(Page 263)
They came up from the town as though on parade, and appeared to be unstoppable, like they would keep going over and through the Confederate line. With grape, shell, and shot, the Rebel guns immediately began their deadly work, pouring a storm of lead into the advancing foe, and blew holes into the dark, solid columns that were filled in like water rushing around a fractured dam. The thunderous salvos of cannonade shook the ground, retorted by the Yankees’ counter-barrage. The men in gray let loose a blood-curdling Rebel yell, and fired a storm of lead canister into the faces of their enemies as they approached, which was enough to send the bluecoats reeling. They stumbled, taking cover behind the bank. A line of colorful Zouaves passed them, but could not withstand the Rebel onslaught either, and fell back in confusion.

(Pages 271-272)
The men awoke to find it was raining, as it usually did after a battle. They discovered that Burnside’s Federals had crossed the river overnight, demoralized into retreating to Washington. A wave of cheers rushed over the Rebel ranks. While the rain dissipated to drizzle, Bud, who was still in a daze, followed some of his comrades out onto the battlefield, which was covered with dead Yankee soldiers. It was obvious from what they saw that the Union army had suffered almost complete annihilation. Some of the Federals died trying to use their comrades’ bodies as shields. What it must have been like to lie in wait while bullets thudded into the bodies of their friends, Bud could only speculate. Besides corpses dressed in blue, some wore Zouave uniforms, while others adorned their trappings with Kelly green. Blue Hugh figured they were with the Irish Brigade, of which he had heard about. The barefoot Confederates immediately set to work, relieving the rigid bodies of their footwear and clothing, as well as their haversacks’ contents. Bud replaced his worn-out brogans that had developed holes in their soles long ago.

Search result for 'zouave' in A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Chapter 3: Chapter Three
"...zouave immediately, voting began to determine who would lead what was now known as the 4th Alabama Infantry Regiment, consisting of fourteen hundred men and ten companies: the Governor’s Guards and the Magnolia Cadets from Dallas County, the Tuskegee zouaves from Macon County, the Canebrake Rifles of Perry and Marengo ..."
"...zouavetwo hours of quiet, the Yankees resumed their assault, and the Confederates fought off several Union advances. Men in colorful garb fashioned after French Algerian zouaves attacked first, but were driven back. Then came, one at a time, three other regiments, but all eventually broke and ran. Their uniforms caused ..."
"...zouavers from other regiments wandered into camp, describing the turmoil that had swirled around them. Brigadier General J. E. B. Stuart, Confederate cavalry commander, had hurled his cavaliers into the New York zouaves, and as the Yankees retreated, all hell broke loose. Civilians from Washington City had driven over to ..."

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Chapter 10: Chapter Ten
"...zouaveame up from the town as though on parade, and appeared to be unstoppable, like they would keep going over and through the Confederate line. With grape, shell, and shot, the Rebel guns immediately began their deadly work, pouring a storm of lead into the advancing foe, and they blew ..."
"...zouaven awoke to find it was raining, as it usually did after a battle. They discovered that Burnside’s Federals had crossed the river overnight, demoralized into retreating to Washington. A wave of cheers rushed over the Rebel ranks. While the rain dissipated to drizzle, Bud, who was still in a ..."

Search result for 'zouave' in the FAQs of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

There were no results for 'zouave' in the FAQs of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

Search result for 'zouave' in Glossary of A Beautiful Glittering Lie

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