Career in Your Suitcase
A practical guide to creating meaningful work... anywhere

change

This is a list of how often and where the term 'change' appears in the book Career in Your Suitcase.


Search result for 'change' in Career in Your Suitcase

0.
"... towards the future with hope and a sense of adventure. A portable career is perfect for today’s mobile dual career family. But if you are mobile then you are inevitably going to have to be able to handle change. Galen Tinder investigates. A well-known rating system measures the amount of ..."
4.
"... Whether stress-inducing events on the list are considered positive or negative, they all share a common feature – all involve change, a change in personal circumstances. It’s not just that negative events are stressful, but that change itself makes heavy demands on our coping resources. ..."
"...The concept of ‘managing’ change may be a misnomer. It’s not as though we can manage change to the point of eliminating its sometimes painful and undesired effects on our life. Managing change is rather like herding cats – even the best of intentions and maximum effort do not guarantee pleasing, much less perfect, ..."
"...So, by managing change we don’t mean conquering or nullifying it, but facing it with courage and openness and thus using it to further our own growth and betterment. The external events that affect our lives may sometimes be desirable and sometimes not. The feelings these events elicit may be pleasurable or painful. ..."
10.
"... depends on whether or not we integrate it into our lives in a way that enhances our personal, emotional and spiritual advancement. - Relocation and change - Relocation is one of the most common and also disruptive sources of change in contemporary life. We have so accepted moving as a ..."
"...Relocation is one of the most common and also disruptive sources of change in contemporary life. We have so accepted moving as a routine feature of our global society that we often forget how emotionally exhausting and challenging it can be. But to appreciate the stress caused by relocating we don’t have to mine any source of knowledge more sophisticated than our ..."
18.
"... family needs to adjust to everything being different in the new location. Nearly every aspect of common family life changes: daily routines, schools, community associations, friendships, even the physical landscape. For the majority of people, this multi-faceted upheaval is tackled while ..."
"...She may not have her work, so there may be no refuge there. On the contrary, she may have resigned from a fulfilling position back home and feel partly the victim of the corporate advancement practices of her husband’s company. For these reasons, the challenges posed by international relocation changes are often unusually stressful. ..."
"...change and stress go together. How many people have we heard say, ‘I just love change; it’s so relaxing’? External events don’t themselves produce stress. But they do trigger a cluster of feelings that constitute stress. Stress consists of an unruly combination of strong and unprocessed feelings, usually including anger, fear and anxiety. When these feelings run around in our systems untamed they consume nearly ..."
"...But we don’t need to be a hapless victim of change and its emotional byproducts. Our key question, then, is this: How do we manage all the changes of relocation, especially international relocation, in a way that enriches, rather than diminishes, our lives? You can find many tips on handling stress in Chapter Eight. ..."
38.
"... a local, as misunderstandings are inevitable if you do business in English only.’ Diane, Canadian in England, www.expatwomen.com - change and transition - William Bridges, an organisation psychologist who has studied and written on how people react to change, differentiates between ..."
40.
"... - William Bridges, an organisation psychologist who has studied and written on how people react to change, differentiates between change and transition. change consists of external events, while transition is the set of internal processes we go through in adjusting to change. Just as ..."
"...Just as Elizabeth Kubler-Ross delineated five stages in a person’s coming to terms with his or her approaching death, Bridges observes that most people react to change by making an inner transition that consists of three distinct stages – Endings, a Neutral Zone and New Beginnings. People achieve successful transitions when they adjust to change through the healthy navigation of each of these three transition stages. When we fail to accomplish the essential tasks of each ..."
"...changeutral Zone is often marked by a sense of dislocation and anxiety. change means heading into unfamiliar territory, and during this passage it’s common to confront a feeling of emptiness. People often feel in limbo; they miss their familiar surroundings but haven’t yet planted firm roots in the new area. ..."
104.
"... our minds and our lives for self-discovery and creativity. One expert on change has remarked that it’s an interlude that deserves to be ‘savoured’. Here are several suggestions for making your Neutral Zone a ‘tasty’ one: Accept what is. Waging a war against circumstances that are ..."
143.
"... own business and by then save myself from depression.’ Jasmine, French in China, www.inspiredbeijing.com and www.expatwomen.com - The challenge of change - To paraphrase the international bestselling psychiatrist, M Scott Peck, change is difficult. Whether it is changing ourselves or ..."
"...To paraphrase the international bestselling psychiatrist, M Scott Peck, change is difficult. Whether it is changing ourselves or adjusting to changes in external circumstances, our relationship with change engages our vital energies. The people who are most successful in ‘managing’ change, to cite our imperfectly stated theme, are those who have successfully initiated change in their own lives. The ..."
"...We all encounter the challenge of change on two fronts. Firstly we need to think about how to respond to changes that originate outside ourselves. This chapter has been focusing on this area. Secondly, we need to be able to initiate and sustain desirable changes in our own patterns of thought and behaviour. ..."
"...Personal change is difficult and our efforts are often met with formidable inner resistance. The fundamental source of this resistance is fear, the emotion that underlies anger and anxiety. People who are brave and venturesome push against this fear to make their desired personal changes. People who bring this capacity for ..."
159.
"... on their own behaviour instead of trying to control the behaviour of others. They take responsibility for themselves and are open to personal change. They know the futility of procrastination and self-pity. They practise flexibility and tolerance of others. People who manage change ..."
"...People who manage change well are those who can make and accept changes in themselves. When a major change such as relocation appears on the horizon, they’re not immune from normal feelings like fear, sadness and anger. But by facing and expressing these feelings, they move towards the future with hope and a ..."

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"...Austin is a 33 year-old computer network administrator who has decided, after 12 years in the field, to change careers. He wants to spend less time with machines and more with people, but beyond this he does not know what direction he wants to head in. Does he want to stay in the computer field but orient himself toward management? Or should he bid farewell to computers altogether? ..."
"...call themselves a Life Coach, Business Coach, Executive Coach, a Transformational Coach or a Career Coach. Some offer a combination of business and life coaching; others combine general life direction coaching with career advice. However, all coaches share one thing in common – their goal is to facilitate positive change in their clients. In discussion with a coach about adopting a new direction, a coach might ask: ‘so where do you want to go?’ or ‘how do you propose to get there?’ and ‘who can you speak to in order to make that happen?’ In other words a coach ..."
64.
"... as possible. Recruiters are sometimes referred to as ‘head-hunters’ and their services are rarely suitable for people who have been out of work for a period of time, for career changers or for people who are not committed to a particular vocational field. Recruiters are most ..."
234.
"... nuggets of relevant information. This is especially the case with career changers. A key challenge in building Janice’s resumé will be to show how her experience with supermarkets can be transferred to the world of local, not-for-profit art organisations. ‘I used a professional resumé ..."

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"...Having worked as an engineer in the UK, I travelled to Hong Kong in 1992 and quickly found a job with an import/export company. A couple of job changes later and whilst studying for a postgraduate qualification in International Business I joined a management consultancy where I worked as a business manager and an associate consultant. I also met and married my Scottish wife Seonaid in Hong Kong and after three years our first son, Ieuan, was born ..."
"...headway in encouraging spouse mobility but, by their very nature, they could not address the heart of the problem – namely the ability to work in the host country in the first place. One wonders whether a stronger spousal (male) voice in pursuing work opportunities is driving organisational lobbying for change or whether the requirement for greater gender equality in expatriation, reflecting the need to exploit all available talent, provides a sufficient driver by itself. Either way, the employer voice is strengthening and, judging by some of the successes achieved so far, governments are listening. Whatever the driver, improved work-permit ..."
"...One businessman, who had worked with international corporate banking firms, took time out to change his career path when his wife got a new job abroad. He found it took years before most of his wife’s new colleagues took him seriously in any capacity, just because he was not employed when they first met him. On one occasion a fellow expat carefully explained about ..."
"...No matter which partner in a couple is offered an expatriate position, and which one would be expected to accompany him or her as the supporting spouse, the change in status of either individual will affect the balance of the relationship. The change in status does not have to be negative to adversely affect the relationship. A promotion may seem to be a good thing – but the increased responsibility can mean additional time away from home, either ..."
"...Becoming an expatriate involves many changes, all of which are stressful. There will be a new home, new country, new culture, new job, new social circle and often a new language and climate to adjust to. But when a couple relocates abroad and there is also a significant change in role and status of one ..."
"...back to work was continually asked by concerned local matriarchs where the baby’s mother was. One day, as he tried to explain that the mother was at work, his command of the local language let him down and he mistakenly said, ‘The baby has no mother.’ The matriarch’s attitude changed from concern to sympathy and praise for taking on such a hard role – thereafter the man always repeated this explanation and his life became much less frustrating. In much of East Asia, however, expatriates look and behave so differently from their hosts that a male accompanying partner would ..."
"...the male accompanying partner who doesn’t even have his job to base their joint identity on. Problems are most likely to arise when the male accompanying partner feels undervalued by his partner and friends, or when he suffers from a loss of self-esteem and subsequent depression due to his change in situation. ..."
"...Having a goal to aim for was probably the most important factor in making the whole arrangement successful. The final destination I was heading for developed and changed over the years as I realised some things were not attainable – but I still kept moving forward. I followed a correspondence course, volunteered, wrote, and accepted job offers I never would have considered before. ..."

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"...When we returned to England for a few years in 1997 with our two children, I noticed things had changed. People no longer had careers for life back home either. Mothers wanted some work-life balance and their frequent domestic relocations meant they wanted portable careers too. By 1998 I had formed Summertime Publishing and published the first edition of A Career in Your Suitcase. Since then, not only ..."

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Chapter 2: Find Your Passion
"...trained nor an experienced chef. With hindsight, I realise my enthusiasm didn’t quite match my skill and some of my ideas left a lot to be desired. After spending a year churning out synopses while I worked as a temporary word processing secretary, I decided it was time to change direction. ..."
"...‘It is like this everywhere, change. Everything is new, so your confidence needs to be very strong just to say “Okay, here I am, wait for me, I am coming.” … I came over here at 24 with my first born son, three month old, and I didn’t know where to go, what to do. ..."
"...‘I have only been here for two or three months. My role has changed… because my wife is here [as the lead employee]. I am now house husband and father… fundamental change... so much that it creates a spiritual crisis… the whole identity has changed from the real one and the new one has not appeared yet… there is a shift in the ..."
"...When I look inside myself, I can also see the values that motivate me and make my professional life work for me. Some people value money, others value fame, free time, flexible hours or variety. Values change over time and it’s worth taking a look at yours regularly. If you want to be true to yourself, you need to consider your values as well as your passions. My values, right now, are: ..."
"...over my (Jo’s) long list of specialisations you may be able to spot the themes or patterns that have run through everything I do. I first wrote the list of values that appeared a few pages back 13 years ago. When I revisit them, it is clear little has changed. The ‘red threads’, the common denominators, that have sustained me despite those ups and downs and five moves, remain: ..."
356.
"... it in the last two weeks What do you notice about the activities: Are they diverse or do they have a great deal in common? Are you still actively involved or have there been changes in your life? Do you see any patterns? What new insights has this list inspired? As an optional exercise to ..."
"...Contrary to popular belief it is not always a fear of failure that stops us from doing something — it is just as likely to be a fear of success. When I (Jo) was a five-year-old, I had to change schools because my family moved house. I have a vivid memory of that first day at my new school when the teacher asked me to stand up and recite the alphabet. I did so, using the adult pronunciation of ‘ay, bee, see’. The teacher told me I was wrong ..."
608.
"... Choose four things you could do almost right away and keep your eyes open for ways to incorporate them into your current situation. Write them down here. Writing down your goals increases your chance of realizing them without limiting you, as you can always change and adapt them as you go along. ..."
626.
"... can come back to the present. Adapted with permission from Radical change in the World of Work: The Workbook, published by the Government of Alberta, Human Resources and Employment. For more career planning exercises, visit www.alis.alberta.ca/careerinsite. Following this visualization it ..."

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Chapter 3: What Can You Do?
"...was at school, we had a campaign to raise student and parental awareness of environmental issues. The slogan was ‘recycle, return, re-use’. Be aware that in every location you may have to recycle, return or re-use some of your skills and interests. You may not always need to change careers completely, but you will probably be called upon to make creative adjustments. This is an area in which you will need to exercise resilience: be flexible and open to new ways of using what you already have. ..."
218.
"... reasoning Other skills / Technical skills: dealing with emergencies exercising self-control giving and receiving feedback managing change multi-tasking performing repetitive tasks resolving conflict taking risks tolerating discomfort Now read through the checklist again: 1. ..."
350.
"... suitable to complement most businesses. ‘In Norway most of my clients came from my husband’s company. Women hate having to change their hairdresser when they move. At least with me being English they knew I would understand what they wanted.’ Pauline, British in Norway, ..."
"...and Jim Bright. This theory calls for an emergent approach to careers and a move away from matching and linear-causal models. This theory suggests that taking a test and matching the results to an occupation is no longer effective in today’s rapidly changing labour market. In a world of change and uncertainty, the chaos theory of career development provides a framework for understanding what approaches and skills will help you navigate your way. These approaches understand the importance of using creativity, intuition and openness, together with the more traditional career development techniques, to create possibilities which can be honed ..."
"...Making a career and life change is a time of opportunity, to get out of ruts you may have been in, to change the way you approach your work, to set different goals and adjust your beliefs in how the world works based on the new experiences you will have. Some doors close, and ..."
"...not meant to be written in stone. It is important to revise it until you are at a point where it satisfies you. However, if you keep changing it every week it will not be the North Star that helps you find your way when the road map changes to off-road travel. You will have the opportunity to further revise your mission stastatement again in Chapter 4 — Create Your Career. ..."

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"...generalizing and look for stories (your own and other people’s) that contradict this generalisation. Breaking through some of these beliefs can help you to recognise and respond to opportunities you may otherwise miss. If you discover a belief, and its resulting pattern in your life, that you wish to change and you are not successfully able to change it on your own, enlist the support of your Blue Sky Team or a professional. ..."
"...Changing how you think about the way the world and work operate will change the results you generate. Make sure your beliefs and understanding of what rules apply are well informed, positively formulated and give you the control of choosing a response that serves you. Gathering this information and challenging your beliefs as necessary can reduce the amount of frustration you may ..."
"...skills women bring with them are precisely those needed in what Seth Godin calls the ‘connection economy’. According to Sally Helgesen, author of The Female Advantage, this confluence of abilities and required leadership capacities is creating unprecedented opportunities for women to play a vital role in leading transformational change in organisations and communities. Management and training consultant Mary Farmer notes that women are better at seeing the human side, quicker to cut through competitive distinctions of hierarchy and ranking, and impatient with cumbersome protocols. ..."
41.
"... for three main reasons: a. Self-assurance compels new paradigm leaders to stay motivated and take risks. b. An obsession with customer service helps them anticipate market changes. c. New paradigm leaders use ‘feminine’ traits to their advantage. - Manage your Expectations - ..."
"...Transitions involving career changes and physical relocations can often have an impact you weren’t expecting. Uninformed and unrealistic expectations are one of our greatest sources of discontent. Manage your expectations appropriately. For example, don’t assume your transition to another culture will be easy. Anticipate challenges and even temporary setbacks. The better you prepare ..."
"...Access the support of your friends, family and new acquaintances to help you make sense of the transition you are going through. A UK study publicised in 2005 in the Calgary Herald noted that with eighteen friends people are able to successfully negotiate change and transition. Here ‘friends’ can range from people you have recently met to those you have known for a very long time. This reinforces the importance of being conscious of your need to connect with others during this transition, and taking action to make this happen, even before you ..."
"...1. What has changed in the world and for you personally since you made your first leap into the world of work and adult choices? Think about the evolution ..."
"...to re-entering this field. You are going to have to be flexible. Sure, you trained to be a nurse and that is what you want to do, what you are good at and where your passion lies. But if the language barrier is insurmountable, you may have to make changes. Think about how you can transfer or ‘morph’ your skills to fit the realities and needs in your new environment. Maybe you could offer English language classes to pregnant women? Or you could offer to go in and visit new mothers in their homes soon after the birth? Perhaps ..."
228.
"... childhood ailments, or run first aid classes? Where there are problems there are also opportunities. If you are flexible and open to change then you may stumble upon a new career that is more fun and rewarding than you thought it might be. The following are some suggestions to generate ..."
530.
"... employees have • The level of education employees have and where they were educated • The rate of occupational title change within the company as compared to other similar companies Because LinkedIn is a living network, the information gathered is up to date. However, its ..."
"...The winds of change that influence work formation and shifts are economic, demographic, technological, social, cultural and societal. It could be there is a regional mini-baby boom creating needs right where you are planning to locate. It could also be a new technological development that creates opportunities. I (Colleen) recently read ..."
"...Harness the winds of change for yourself and use them to sail to your next career destination! The previous exercises will have helped you gather information you need. Now think about this information from a trends and demographics or big picture perspective. You may have an ‘aha’ moment and gain some insights that ..."
"...you are discovering, a mission statement isn’t something you write overnight. It takes careful analysis and deep introspection, and could take several weeks or months to get it to be a complete concise expression of your innermost values and directions. You may need to review it regularly and make changes as required, depending on your experiences and circumstances. ..."
683.
"... I will join clubs and groups and contributing to their success where I can • I will offer free support to 4 people making international moves in exchange for a recommendation on LinkedIn and a quote for my website • I will join related LinkedIn groups, share what I know and learn from ..."
"...The beautiful thing about making plans is that they are made to be changed! Life has a great way of introducing curves in the road where none were expected. Some of these curves give way to opportunities that are serendipitous. John Krumboltz says serendipity happens when planning meets opportunity. Don’t become so fixated on carrying out your action plan that you ..."
"...The same applies for living out your mission and vision. What are some of the changes and potential investments you will need to make? Your mission needs to inspire you to go beyond the inconvenience of some of these changes and continue to make the investments over the long term. If needed make some revisions to your mission to ensure that the inspiration you need ..."

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Chapter 5: Networking
"...Dr Anne Copeland, director of The Interchange Institute in Brookline MA, has conducted a series of studies into the happiness of accompanying partners. Copeland has discovered that it’s not the women who maintain close contact with their friends and family back home who adjust best, nor is it those who have a strong family unit with ..."
"...shown that women with strong social networks are usually physically and emotionally healthier than those who are isolated,’ she says. ‘But when a woman moves half way round the world she is hit triply hard. Firstly, she needs the support of friends more than ever because of all the changes she encounters. Secondly, she’s now far away from those who know her best. And thirdly, she faces language and cultural barriers to making new friends.’ ..."
"...be like that, particularly if it’s to produce the desired outcome. We could just as easily call the subject of this chapter ‘relationship building’, ‘connecting’ or ‘making new friends’. Networking is taking a method you use naturally on a personal level and using it to form relationships and exchange information with people with whom you share vocational and professional interests. Donna Messer built her business out of networking. A regular on the international speakers’ circuit at conferences and for corporations, her business, Connect Us Canada, facilitates connections between people and businesses. Donna has a training suite ..."
113.
"... through to the sites of those who are featured there, and get in touch. Expat sites Sites such as: www.expatexchange.com www.expatwomen.com www.expatica.com www.paguro.net To help you to connect with other expatriates in your new location before you arrive. Try ..."
"...you understand them, and that you have a common bond. It’s a means of creating trust and understanding and being able to see each other’s point of view (though not necessarily agreeing to it). Building rapport is fundamental to creating connections, communicating effectively with others, negotiating, teaching or introducing change. ..."
"...It was after the Paris presentation I (Jo) came to realise the power of public speaking. My workshop had lasted over two hours, but the queue of people who wanted to buy my book, ask additional questions or exchange business cards, lasted a further hour. There were several hundred delegates at the conference and it would have been impossible for me to meet them all at the various break times. Now, after giving this presentation, I could be identified by more than a third of the attendees. Thanks ..."
"...Since that first presentation at WIN I (Jo) have now spoken to organisations and corporations all over the world. A month doesn’t pass when I don’t speak to my target market. Usually I am paid to speak. But one thing that does not change is the networking potential of these engagements. When Woman Abroad magazine was first launched on the international market, we decided to market it by giving away up to ..."
"...Next we held a discussion on how everyone wanted to proceed and chose to hold monthly meetings on a weekday evening. For the first year we had about 13 regulars, the next year about 20, and ultimately most meetings were attended by 30 or more. Each year we changed the committee, one person was responsible for sending out press releases regarding the next meeting, and another for writing a meeting report which we circulated to everyone on the mailing list. ..."
493.
"... Please describe your career path for me — your qualifications and experience in this field. b. What are some of the changes you have seen in this field over the course of your career? c. In your opinion, what qualifications does one need to enter this field today? d. What are some of ..."
"...I (Jo) know my greatest fear is not the walking into a room filled with strangers, but that I will walk into the room alone, and no one will talk to me. However, once I arrive it only takes one person to exchange a few words with me, or to tell me where to find the coffee, and I feel much better. Perhaps you could persuade a friend to accompany you on your first visit? This might allay your fear of going alone. However, you should not fall into the trap of ..."
"...in the situations you most commonly find yourself. Practise on your friends and get their feedback, then try them out and see which work best when you are with complete strangers. And just as you may keep changing your location or what you do, remember you may need to change your elevator pitch too. ..."
638.
"... and other social media • make a point of emailing soon after the event to say how much you enjoyed meeting them. This will enter their email address into your contacts. After a few email exchanges you are more likely to really remember them and vice versa Once a year it’s a good ..."
"...Equip yourself so you can keep track of all these contacts, and try to keep contact details updated as people often move or change email addresses. This is where online networking tools like LinkedIn and Facebook are handy as people update their profiles and contact information themselves. Every now and again, flick back through these records to remind yourself just how many people you know and who you have ..."

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"...you will probably still need to supply the required documentation to meet some procedural requirements. The society in which we now look for work is more competitive, complicated and confusing than a generation ago. Much of this has to do with the accelerated pace of change — and, of course, the impact of the Internet on our economy and society. The CV today will most likely be a digital one sent with an email cover-letter and you may be interviewed using Skype, but the key basic elements are still the same. Below you will ..."
"...The growth of the Internet has produced marked changes in how most of us live, work and connect with information and other people. The rate of change online is unprecedented and what follows may be out of date already by the time of printing. To access the most up to date information about using the Internet for work ..."
"...Market analysis — unless you know what the market needs/wants and what the competition is doing, you are shooting in the dark. Start out by looking at the political situation, the economic climate, finding out what advances or changes there are in technology and any social trends. This may give you an insight into possible gaps and opportunities. Consider the ‘barriers to entry’ in your market, the threats, potential new entrants, what buyers require, the nature of your competition and what it offers, and other possible substitute products/services ..."
"...that identifies who you are, the essence of your achievements and what you have to offer. Once that’s completed you should set some strategies on how you are going to get to where you want to be. Choose where to focus your energy and where you want to make changes. Be honest about what you really want rather than doing what you or others think you should be doing. ..."

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"...Bartering can take all shapes and forms. A friend of mine (Colleen) designed my first website for me for a bottle of wine. Another friend of mine joined a bartering network and taught mosaicing skills in exchange for haircuts. The same can be done for many other skills and services. What skills do you have? What do people ask for your help with? Ask them if you can exchange it for learning from one of their areas of expertise. ..."
80.
"... off the ground. ‘My mother always says that a vacation is just a change of work. I have always made a point of visiting all potteries and galleries wherever we have been on holiday. I also take lots of courses for up to two weeks at a time. They are really inspiring.’ Cheryl, American ..."
115.
"... manual, beware. 9. Optimism This is perhaps one of the key attributes of a successful businessperson. Optimists think failure is caused by something that can be changed or learned, while pessimists take personal blame for any failure, attributing it to a character defect they are ..."
"...‘It’s really important not to assume that your product or service will succeed in a different country just because it did well in your home country. Market research is crucial and it might be necessary to change your business model. Setting up an after-school tuition centre in Egypt required introducing a completely different business strategy, and not taking this into consideration would have meant a much harder struggle.’ ..."
"...have also employed this method many times. When I am trying out a new course, I will usually offer it at half price to students the first time. I explain they get a special price but I would like their honest feedback on the course and a testimonial in exchange. Sometimes I give students free places on my courses even though the courses themselves are established and successful. I do this for several reasons. One is that I like to mentor new writers and allowing those who cannot afford to pay to attend my classes free of charge is ..."
"...50/50 split. There is no one size fits all approach to this, so our advice is to talk to other people in a similar business and learn from what they do. Finally, you could pass work onto third parties in exchange for what is called a finder’s fee. This could be a one-off fee or a percentage of the first invoice, perhaps. ..."
"...from home or set up your own independent location. Flexible work spaces are increasingly available that allow entrepreneurs to work from an office location with other entrepreneurs and book only the amount of office hours they need or want. This allows for connections to be made, collaboration to happen, exchange of ideas and provides an antidote to the sometimes lonely pursuit of working for yourself. Visit www.loosecubes.com for one business model and if you have a work location with extra space, consider opening offering to a loosecubes member. Google flexible workspace or entrepreneur workspace and follow your leads. ..."
"...‘working’ you and the ‘at home’ you, with some transition time in the car or train to change roles. In the home-based business, you have to work harder to delineate and differentiate these roles — but it can be done and the work/life balance can be significantly enhanced. So it’s important to create a working environment for yourself that will make you feel professional and will help ..."
"...and result in dissatisfaction and grumbling among family members. Don’t make them feel that they never know when they can ask you for a simple favour. Have a chat with your partner or significant other before you start your business. Discuss how your respective roles will change once your business gets rolling. How will household responsibilities be adjusted? How will child care arrangements change? Will you need your partner to be available during evening hours for some childcare if your business schedule demands some evening time? This is not as simple an arrangement as a family ..."
"...more difficult. It worked pretty well till my baby was 6 months old but became impossible afterwards. My baby wanted of course to be with me and was making very sweet noises that sounded quite inappropriate during my conference calls. Also, I had many interruptions to feed her, change her nappy. At the end, I was feeling like I had to work 10 hours to accomplish work requiring 5 hours. In the end the benefit of being with my child was becoming a huge stress. I think that a home office does not really work with small children ..."

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Chapter 8: For the Journey
0.
"... basis.’ Yvonne McNulty, Author, Being Dumped In To Sink or Swim in Human Resource Development International Journal, 2012 - change - Change is a constant element of life. To think otherwise is to invite disillusionment. Kids grow and change constantly. In adults the ..."
"...change is a constant element of life. To think otherwise is to invite disillusionment. Kids grow and change constantly. In adults the process slows down, but it continues. The stability the workforce had a few years ago is no longer the reality for most. Finding work-life balance is often elusive when responding to and initiating change. And stress accompanies change. ..."
4.
"... reality for most. Finding work-life balance is often elusive when responding to and initiating change. And stress accompanies change. Two kinds of change There are two kinds of change: voluntary and involuntary. Voluntary change is something you have actively chosen, such as accepting a ..."
"...There are two kinds of change: voluntary and involuntary. Voluntary change is something you have actively chosen, such as accepting a promotion, starting your own business or relocating to another country. Involuntary change is caused by events beyond your control. Being laid off or experiencing the death of a loved one are examples of change ..."
"...did so of my own free will. Some of the consequences of this move I didn’t actively, knowingly, choose. For example, retaking my driving theory and practical exams in order to have a driver’s license was not an active choice on my part. I perceived them to be involuntary changes resulting from the change I voluntarily made. However, I could still take action to deal with them effectively. ..."
10.
"... be involuntary changes resulting from the change I voluntarily made. However, I could still take action to deal with them effectively. Relocation and change Relocation creates change on at least three levels according to Galen Tinder of REA: Physical relocation: Logistical details of ..."
12.
"... made. However, I could still take action to deal with them effectively. Relocation and change Relocation creates change on at least three levels according to Galen Tinder of REA: Physical relocation: Logistical details of selling or renting a house, securing housing in the new ..."
"...Family relocation: The entire family needs to adjust to everything being different in the new location. Nearly every aspect of common family life changes - daily routines, schools, service providers, and friendships. Children will need various kinds of extra attention according to their age and the move itself ..."
20.
"... places — a time, in other words, of loss People who have moved within and across borders agree foreign relocations make the heaviest demands on a person’s emotional resources due in large part to the language and cultural changes experienced. ‘In a country like Egypt you need to have ..."
31.
"... William Bridges, an organisational psychologist who has studied and written on how people react to change, differentiates between change and transition. change consists of external events, while transition is the set of internal processes we go through in adjusting to change. THE ..."
"...Bridges observes that most people react to change by making an inner transition of three distinct stages — Endings, a Neutral Zone and New Beginnings. In other words, a transition starts with an ending and ends with a new beginning. People achieve successful transitions when they adjust to change through the healthy navigation of each of ..."
"...changeutral Zone is often marked by a sense of dislocation and anxiety. change means heading into unfamiliar territory, and during this passage it’s common to confront a feeling of emptiness. People often feel in limbo; they miss their familiar surroundings but haven’t yet planted firm roots in the ..."
77.
"... People who work through their fear of change and resistance to it will have more success making desired personal changes. People who bring this capacity for self- change to meet the challenges of external change are rewarded with a rich and dynamic life. People who manage ..."
"...People who manage change well are those who can make and accept changes in themselves. When a major change appears on the horizon, they’re not immune from normal feelings like fear, sadness and anger. But by facing and expressing these feelings, they move towards the future with hope and a sense of ..."
"...male accompanying partner who doesn’t even have his job to base their joint identity on. Problems are most likely to arise when the male accompanying partner feels undervalued by his partner and friends, or when he suffers from a loss of self-esteem and subsequent depression due to his change in situation.’ ..."
103.
"... depression due to his change in situation.’ Huw Francis, Author of Live and Work Abroad: A Guide for Modern Nomads - The Challenge Of change - To paraphrase the international bestselling psychiatrist, M Scott Peck, author of The Road Less Travelled, change is difficult. ..."
"...To paraphrase the international bestselling psychiatrist, M Scott Peck, author of The Road Less Travelled, change is difficult. Add to that statement the reality that life is change. It is growing from one stage to another, learning and accepting the changes that accompany each stage. Whether it is changing ourselves or adjusting to changes in external circumstances, our relationship with change engages our vital energies. ..."
107.
"... some ways. This is normal and to be expected. Using the tools listed below can help increase your awareness of how you are resisting change, help you make a plan to address the resistance and get the most out of the changes you are going through. Blogging, journaling and your ..."
"...Creating a portable career, work search, starting to run your own business and adapting to changes all take hard work. Of course you will have down times, and times when you feel like giving up and retreating from the world. Self-motivation is one of the key attributes required by anyone who repeatedly has to reinvent themselves, or pick up a temporarily shelved career. Margaret Chapman, ..."
119.
"... models, create an environment which lifts our spirits and build our own support network or hire a coach. Successful changers have often developed these skills in order to deal with change — changes they initiate as well as changes outside their control. They are attitudes or ways of thinking ..."
120.
"... change changes they initiate as well as changes outside their control. They are attitudes or ways of thinking which can be learned and help you respond well to change. See the techniques for coping with stress later in this chapter for more approaches for handling stress and change. ..."
"...Studies are showing one of the keys to successfully dealing with change and transition, as well as life’s other challenges, is something called resilience. We have mentioned it several times throughout this book as a key skill for your career development. What do you do when Plan A doesn’t come together? When your computer dies with your masterpiece business plan or ..."
"...To change how you feel about anything, including stressors, you need to change what you are focusing on. Ask questions which give you useful answers. If you ask yourself negative questions you will get negative answers. Instead of asking why life is so unfair or why something always happens ..."
410.
"... With all of the changes and developments occurring in the world, the skills needed and the process used to choose and find work have become more involved and complex. Just as you seek professional support for other complex life situations, you may choose to do the same for your career. ..."
"...First we need to define what we are talking about. Just as the professional roles within the field are not yet clearly defined and agreed upon, the use of the terms can also be confusing. For example ‘career’ and ‘job’ are often used interchangeably and this can lead to much confusion. Consult the glossary at the end of this book to see how the terms have been defined and used here. ..."
"... Coach, Business Coach, Executive Coach, Transformational Coach, Personal Coach, Expat Coach or a Career Coach. Some offer a combination of business and life coaching, others combine general life direction coaching with career advice. All coaches share one thing in common — their goal is to facilitate positive change in their clients. A coach does not tell you what to do, but helps you uncover your authentic desires and map out a plan for achieving them. They may also use formal or informal assessment tools as part of the coaching process. ..."

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