Career in Your Suitcase
A practical guide to creating meaningful work... anywhere

expat

This is a list of how often and where the term 'expat' appears in the book Career in Your Suitcase.


Search result for 'expat' in Career in Your Suitcase

"...upheaval is tackled while moving within the borders of a single country. But for some, it’s an international experience. People who have made both kinds of moves agree that foreign relocations make the heaviest demands on a person’s emotional resources. Here are just a few of the challenges facing expatriates: ..."
26.
"... organisations work, from the library to the police force, from the food store to the traffic authority. For the expatriate partner: finding fulfilling vocational and non vocational pursuits. In an expatriate family the accompanying partner may shoulder more stress than the employee. She (only ..."
"...In an expatriate family the accompanying partner may shoulder more stress than the employee. She (only about 15 per cent of international accompanying partners are male) is in the more exposed and vulnerable position. Although the employee too must negotiate much that is new, he has the advantage of being grounded in ..."
36.
"... to speak the language, preferably a local, as misunderstandings are inevitable if you do business in English only.’ Diane, Canadian in England, www.expatwomen.com - Change and transition - William Bridges, an organisation psychologist who has studied and written on how people ..."
72.
"... my colleagues, peers and my clients. I felt I didn’t belong.’ Ursula, South African in America, www.marketingmentorexpert.com and www.expatwomen.com What can help us say goodbye? Every year thousands of domestically and internationally relocating families have found that parting ..."
90.
"... for not handling everything perfectly. These suggestions apply as much to expatriating and repatriating relocaters as they do to those who move domestically, though international pre-relocation visits are difficult to arrange for obvious reasons. Don’t hesitate to ask for help. Well, you ..."
"...hesitate, but do it anyway. Don’t confuse asking for help with self-pity or weakness. Admitting your limitations takes strength, and it bestows a kindness on others because most people like to help another person. expatriates report that it is valuable to arrive equipped with the contact information for other expatriates from their own country. Network, network and network some more! ..."
128.
"... a harsh pep talk and put together my action plan in marketing myself, my qualifications and making contacts.’ Carol, American, http://delhi4cats.wordpress.com and www.expatwomen.com - Expatriate Partners – Their Special Situation - We often can’t control events, but we can plan for ..."
130.
"... my qualifications and making contacts.’ Carol, American, http://delhi4cats.wordpress.com and www.expatwomen.com - expatriate Partners – Their Special Situation - We often can’t control events, but we can plan for what we want to do when we encounter them. Our focus in this book, ..."
"...We often can’t control events, but we can plan for what we want to do when we encounter them. Our focus in this book, of course, is on career, employment and vocation. Many expatriate spouses make tentative plans for how to continue their career in another country and then adapt this goal to the environment and circumstances they encounter. When it is impossible to obtain paid employment, these partners find and create opportunities for developing their professional capabilities through volunteering and community activities. ..."
"...Planning is aided by research, and happily it’s now far easier to prepare for the exigencies of expatriate vocational adventuring than it was even ten years ago. Reliable information about nearly every country in the world is now easily available. A recent check of a popular online bookshop immediately turned up almost 50 current titles on working in foreign countries. Whether or not a partner has worked ..."
"...Many accompanying partners, depending on the country they are in, are unable to obtain remunerative employment. If you can know before you move that your country of destination restricts expatriate employment options, you can spare yourself the frustration of developing unrealistic pre-departure expectations. This will also give you the time to gather information about the alternatives to paid work – alternatives that will engage and advance you vocationally, if not financially. ..."
141.
"... about myself. I then took the decision to start my own business and by then save myself from depression.’ Jasmine, French in China, www.inspiredbeijing.com and www.expatwomen.com - The challenge of change - To paraphrase the international bestselling psychiatrist, M Scott Peck, ..."

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46.
"... before, she made me think about things prior to reacting. Now I tend to think before jumping into a situation.’ Lizzy, British in America, www.expatwomen.com - Mentors - Mentors also come in different sizes and shapes. A mentor is generally a person who is in a similar field ..."
281.
"... what it available and can match the client up with the resources that will be most helpful to the particulars of his search. - Career Consulting For expatriates - As this book amply demonstrates with its numerous personal stories, pursuing vocational goals can be both more complicated and ..."
"...As this book amply demonstrates with its numerous personal stories, pursuing vocational goals can be both more complicated and more adventurous as an expat than on your own turf. Your eligibility to work at all may be curtailed by government regulations. Some countries prohibit non-nationals from holding regular full time jobs. Obviously the best time to find this out is before the move. But don’t unquestioningly assume that an official policy against the ..."
"...very helpful in gathering and interpreting this information, both before and after your move. Although native-born consultants may have a close acquaintance with the pertinent rules and regulations governing the work options of foreign nationals, you may find it easier to work with somebody who is part of the expatriate community and well connected with other expats. ..."
"...or not, it’s naturally important that your career consultant be familiar with all of the formalities of the classic job search as well as the informalities and idiosyncrasies of the national and local culture. She should also be able to network you into relationships with both nationals and other expatriates who can help you from the ‘been-there and done-that’ vantage point. ..."
"...One of the themes of this book is that even in the absence of formal employment, expatriates have a wealth of opportunities with which to enrich themselves personally, socially and vocationally. Even if the vocational enrichment doesn’t include monetary recompense, it can add to what you will offer your next employer upon repatriation. Experienced expatriates, including those who have spent many years abroad in different countries, ..."
"...nationality or first language will depend on the country and on language compatibilities. Even in countries where the profession of career consulting is formally unknown, you may be able to find local citizens who can fulfill many of the functions we have identified in this chapter. If not, the expatriate population may boast several people whose experience, insight and counsel can help you to determine your direction. ..."
"...The nature of your expatriate experience depends partly on whether your new home shares your native country’s cultural history. For example, Americans who move to France or Italy normally have a smoother transition than their counterparts who spend several years in Zimbabwe. No matter where you are, you will probably have opportunities that will ..."

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2.
"... himself and a brand new identity. His story will resonate with and inspire accompanying partners, both male and female. - The Rise of a New Breed of expat Spouse - Despite the advent of female emancipation, women’s rights, laws against sexual discrimination and the growth of political ..."
"...emancipation, women’s rights, laws against sexual discrimination and the growth of political correctness – men still usually earn more than women, rise more quickly and higher up the corporate ladder, are thought to be more career minded and have a much greater likelihood of being sent abroad as an expatriate employee. Women, on the other hand, may be thought more family- than career-oriented and more willing to let their husband’s career take precedence over theirs. ..."
"...Slowly but surely the number of female expatriate employees is increasing, and some surveys have indicated that almost 23 per cent of expatriate employees are now women. Consequently, as more women do become expatriate employees, as opposed to expatriate spouses, more men are becoming accompanying spouses – though a larger percentage of female expatriate employees, compared to ..."
12.
"... is not married. As shown in the introduction to this book, as many as 17 per cent of accompanying partners are now male. - Huw Francis – a new expat spouse! - Having worked as an engineer in the UK, I travelled to Hong Kong in 1992 and quickly found a job with an import/export ..."
"...they could not address the heart of the problem – namely the ability to work in the host country in the first place. One wonders whether a stronger spousal (male) voice in pursuing work opportunities is driving organisational lobbying for change or whether the requirement for greater gender equality in expatriation, reflecting the need to exploit all available talent, provides a sufficient driver by itself. Either way, the employer voice is strengthening and, judging by some of the successes achieved so far, governments are listening. Whatever the driver, improved work-permit regulations will provide a kick-start, but the organisations should not ..."
26.
"... about the new breed? - As the employee, leading expatriate women face different issues than when they are an accompanying spouse – and their accompanying partners face different issues from those that male expatriate employees have traditionally faced. For many of these couples this ..."
"...For example, a female expatriate employee whose husband stayed at home to look after their children faced constant criticism from her mother, who thought that it was wrong for her to work while her husband ‘lived off her’. Women employees can also find themselves commonly assumed to be the bilingual secretary in the office, ..."
"...time out to change his career path when his wife got a new job abroad. He found it took years before most of his wife’s new colleagues took him seriously in any capacity, just because he was not employed when they first met him. On one occasion a fellow expat carefully explained about an investment opportunity he was looking into and condescendingly explained about stock sales, IPOs and the investment bank that was handling the deal, and then asked if the male accompanying partner had heard of Goldman Sachs. When he replied, ‘Yeah, they used to be one of ..."
"...For female expatriate spouses there is a plethora of women’s support groups to assist, encourage and, yes, support relocated women. Dedicated support groups for men are rare, however. STUDS (Spouse Trailing Under Duress Successfully), in Brussels, has been active for many years, but the London branch has faded from view. ..."
"...No matter which partner in a couple is offered an expatriate position, and which one would be expected to accompany him or her as the supporting spouse, the change in status of either individual will affect the balance of the relationship. The change in status does not have to be negative to adversely affect the relationship. A promotion may seem ..."
"...For the parents of the expatriate couple, though, it can be anathema for the woman to work and the man to stay at home. Any resulting loudly voiced negative reactions from family and friends can cause additional and unwanted stress during what is already a difficult transition. Of course in-laws can be notorious sources of ..."
"...Becoming an expatriate involves many changes, all of which are stressful. There will be a new home, new country, new culture, new job, new social circle and often a new language and climate to adjust to. But when a couple relocates abroad and there is also a significant change in role and ..."
"...The host culture may also be less familiar than the home culture with the concept of a woman taking the lead career role in a relationship. This can cause difficulties both personally and professionally in some countries, though in many parts of the world expatriates are expected to be different anyway, so it may cause less comment than at ‘home’. ..."
"...him down and he mistakenly said, ‘The baby has no mother.’ The matriarch’s attitude changed from concern to sympathy and praise for taking on such a hard role – thereafter the man always repeated this explanation and his life became much less frustrating. In much of East Asia, however, expatriates look and behave so differently from their hosts that a male accompanying partner would not often attract much additional attention. ..."
"...expatriates often sense their differences from the local community, but a couple consisting of a working woman and an accompanying male partner is likely to be different not only from the local community, but from the rest of the expatriate community too. This complete sense of difference can be an isolating experience and can become problematic, especially for the male accompanying partner who doesn’t even have his job to base their joint identity on. Problems are most likely to arise when the male accompanying partner feels undervalued by his ..."
"...An expatriate couple embracing the ‘trailing male role, having carefully thought through the implications of doing so, is going to have a better chance of successfully setting themselves up in their new lifestyle than one who takes it on with little forethought. Approaching the experience with a positive attitude will go ..."
"...Once a couple is abroad, the fact that the spouse is a male accompanying partner becomes an obvious and unavoidable fact. At parties, social gatherings and in daily life, the initial batch of questions asked of newly arrived expatriates always includes, ‘So... what do you do?’ The answer ‘nothing’ provokes various reactions, and almost always involves some element of surprise – though it can include disapproval or downright derision. Being confident and proud of your answer will increase the likelihood of a positive response – whatever you decide ..."
"...much of his personal sense of worth through his job, this lack of status can be demoralising. Starting from a position where he feels himself in some way to be less than the working men around him, he can then find it hard to integrate himself into the male expatriate community. ..."
"...So I made the first adjustment of many in my career aims. I decided to write some non-fiction articles (because they’re much quicker to write) and get them published while I was writing the novel. Being an expatriate it seemed like a good idea to write travel pieces and articles about expatriate living. ..."
"...Over the years the expatriate living articles got published fairly regularly, but it takes a lot of effort to sell a travel article on a city that gets visited by less than five per cent of all tourists who visit the country. Mind you, I did sell a few destination pieces on Ankara. Getting ..."
"...Not many people seemed to take my writing career seriously during that first year in Turkey, though with the friends who were supportive, the subject of writing a handbook on expatriate living was also raised quite a lot. Among those who were less supportive it seemed to be a common idea that writing was easy and something that anybody could do, so it was really not that impressive. Somehow, during that first year in Turkey, the idea of writing a ..."
"...Then, a year after we arrived in Ankara, a new family arrived and I was no longer the only expatriate with a young child on the campus. When I’d been the only parent of a pre-schooler I had spent a lot of time wandering around the city, shopping in the markets and enjoying the wonderful food of the little restaurants in the narrow streets of the old town. With ..."
"...The new spouse, Michelyne Callan, also seemed keen on the idea of writing the handbook for expatriates and we agreed to work on it together. I bought a few books, notably How to Write A Book Proposal by Michael Larsen, The Writer’s Handbook (UK publication) and The Writers Market (US publication) – and started to write the outline and book proposal. ..."
"...Being at home with a pre-school child has its good points, but intellectual conversation isn’t one of them. So to meet people, I volunteered to edit an orientation handbook for newly arrived expatriates in Ankara, and also participated in orientation programmes every summer as the new expatriates arrived. At the time I offered to take part in this for the benefit of my sanity, but in the long run the volunteering had other benefits too. ..."
"...was able to send out press releases via the Internet to businesses, consultants and my friends across the globe. By encouraging people to forward my announcements to their friends as well, it went even further. As the book was available from Amazon.co.uk, Amazon.com, Amazon.fr, Amazon.jp and other online bookstores, expatriates and potential expatriates all round the world could get hold of the book, even though it might not be in their local bookstore. ..."
159.
"... Although I write mostly on the subject of expatriate living, I have found a niche that not many other writers on this subject can fill: I am a male accompanying partner. I don’t always write on this subject – but I can offer a different point of view on many aspects of international living. ..."
"...The most important factor in making my endeavours successful, though, was my wife. Everyone expects the accompanying expatriate spouse to be supportive to his or her working partner, but it needs to work both ways. Seonaid was very positive about my ambitions and without that support it would have been much harder to create a niche for myself with which I was comfortable. However, if I hadn’t ..."
"...easy to put into practice. What to do, where to find clients, how to manage the business, how to make sure you get paid? The practical aspects are challenge enough in your own country, but abroad they can seem insurmountable. A good start is to take advice from other expatriates and your embassy that can guide you on local business conditions and services. Though other expatriates are a good source of information, try to make sure you ask people who have actually tried working for themselves (preferably in that location) and not just thought about it – there will ..."
"...You need a product to sell, whether it’s a physical object or your own knowledge that other people want. As an expatriate, certain markets will be closed to you, while others are much more open. For example, unless you have good foreign language skills, or the language of your host country is the same as yours, you may find it difficult to market your product to locals – unless the foreign ..."
"...Fortunately, there are some huge markets out there perfect for expatriate entrepreneurs, as is discussed extensively in Chapter Seven , ‘Working for Yourself’ – your home country, other countries where they speak your language, as well as other expatriates. English happens to be the language of international business, so the fact that you’re reading this book means you can also ..."
"...Locally produced English language newspapers and magazines seem to be available in most countries around the world, produced by the British and American Chambers of Commerce, local investment agencies and expatriate entrepreneurs. These publications can be an excellent source of contacts, clients and ideas – as well as markets in themselves if you want to be a writer. ..."
"...The Internet has supposedly revolutionised many aspects of our lives, and for expatriate entrepreneurs it certainly makes life much easier. The telephone directories of most countries are now online – both white and yellow pages. There are numerous electronic directories of companies, classified by function, product, nationality, domicile and language, that are accessible from your desktop – use search engines such as ..."

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Chapter 12: 60 brilliant ideas
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"... workshops. 54. Create a free flyer that advertises all the locally run workshops and courses in English. 55. Run a public relations service advertising local expat businesses to expats. 56. Source products that are hard to come by in your new location. 57. Teach others how to garden in their ..."

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"...expat 1987 I (Jo) had enjoyed a successful career as a partner in a computer training business. I made my living from teaching and writing and had already published more than ten computer handbooks. Then I got married and my husband was posted to Dubai. Telling me I would ..."
"...is based on your own unique set of skills, values, passion and vision and is not based in a physical location. Lower costs of travel and technological advances have made the global labour market a more accessible option for more workers and businesses than in the past. Megan Fitzgerald, expat career and entrepreneur coach defines a portable career as location independent, using skills that are in high demand, providing virtual products and services. It is non-jurisdictional, not housed in brick and mortar, and is a good fit for subject matter experts. Examples include working in administrative support, accounting, IT ..."
"...During the first decade I made and sold chutney, and taught French, creative writing and computer skills. I became a journalist, wrote manuals and newsletters and self- published a cookery book. When I noticed how desperate the local expatriates were for books I turned to network marketing and sold Dorling Kindersley books and CD-ROMs. When I heard my dinner guests commending the delicious curry our Indian housekeeper had prepared, I ran a small take away service. I soon realised problems are opportunities in disguise. ..."
"...2008 I decided to take the publishing company I had formed in 1997 to publish my own books to another level and to offer this service to my mentoring clients. Today, Summertime Publishing has over 70 titles in print and Kindle format and sells its books via Amazon and www.expatbookshop. com. My niche and specialisation, is books by and for people who live overseas. ..."

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Chapter 2: Find Your Passion
"...maid service in the apartment, so I had little to do. Shorts and tee-shirts didn’t need much ironing. Despite the fact I soon had a driving licence, I was nervous about taking to the roads alone. I felt like a ‘hollow woman’ as Valerie Scane, writer and speaker on expatriate issues, would say. I didn’t feel whole without my computer and some work to do. ..."
38.
"... buy him his own birthday present. ‘You need guts. You need to have the courage to say “I am going to do this.”’ Belinda, Dutch, The expatriate Archive, OAC5/3/3 ‘It is like this everywhere, change. Everything is new, so your confidence needs to be very strong just to say “Okay, ..."
42.
"... do I do here? And you just feel you don’t really know where to go, what to do, or if you are doing things right.’ Flavia, Italian, The expatriate Archive, OAC5/3/3 ‘I have only been here for two or three months. My role has changed… because my wife is here [as the lead employee]. ..."
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"... it starts to open up the whole empty space, that I haven’t seen [before] and I don’t want to look at it.’ Wong, Malaysian in Europe, The expatriate Archive, OAC5/3/3 ‘The reality of experience was different from our expectations. Although I consider myself extremely lucky to have ..."
"...a computer teacher, a trainer of trainers, a computer training centre course developer, a manufacturer of Christmas decorations, a Dorling Kindersley book distributor, a manufacturer and marketer of date chutney, a founder of writers’ circles, a keynote speaker, teacher, trainer and a newsletter editor. I have edited two international expat magazines, started helping others to write their books in 2002 and been a serious publisher since 2008. ..."
"...and newspapers. I love writing and in order to give me the most satisfaction, I needed to write about subjects that interested me. It became clear I had picked up a few more skills and passions to add to my list. I could now call myself an expert on expatriate living and portable careers. I began in earnest to look for opportunities. Within a few months I was writing for Resident Abroad (later called FT expat), The Weekly Telegraph, Women’s Business Magazine and the Smart Moves section of The Independent on Sunday. ..."
"...expat05, we moved abroad again, this time to The Hague, Netherlands, and having been careful to make my business global, many of my clients came too. I continued to help people write their books, marketed my workshops locally and, of course, kept on writing my books. In 2006, expat Entrepreneur ..."
115.
"... list as well as a second edition of Dates. More recently I’ve published two writing courses, an anthology of poetry and a novel, and created the online expat Bookshop. Summertime Publishing now publishes about 12 books a year for expat authors. We believe it’s a right to be able to do ..."
"...about their food. Not content to be ever the tourist, for me, studying French meant I also lived in France and had French friends. As a teenager I had many pen pal friends, and visited them on my own, in Germany and France, each summer. My potential love for expatriate life was written in my stars long before I chose to study French at university. ..."
814.
"... productive and stimulated resulting in greater achievements and performance.’ Carol, American, http://delhi4cats.wordpress.com and www.expatwomen.com ‘I think the key to success is to be working on something you ab-so-lute-ly love doing or feel very passionately about. It would be ..."
818.
"... about. It would be very difficult to stay focused and housebound doing something that you didn’t believe in.’ Victoria, New Zealander in India, www.expatwomen.com ..."

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Chapter 3: What Can You Do?
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"... us, to fit in … The concept of work, of career, you have to redefine it all again.’ (Paraphrased from original.) Wong, Malaysian in Europe, The expatriate Archive, OAC5/3/3 Recycle In Dubai I (Jo) taught word-processing, but when I moved four hours down the road to Muscat I found there ..."
76.
"... the forefront, which I had routinely done prior to locating to the Kingdom.’ Carol, American, http://delhi4cats.wordpress.com and www.expatwomen.com Return Some skills and passions are just not made for a given location. For example, dates were hard to come by in Norway in 1996, so ..."
85.
"... and got moved here… same thing. The system’s so different… none of the qualifications are registered.’ Julia, British in the Netherlands, The expatriate Archive, OAC5/3/3 Re-use Some skills transfer more easily than others from place to place. There are few dates in Norway and ..."
"...at discount. The discount increases as you sell more products. Cabouchon is a good choice of party plan product because jewellery is relatively easy to post. It is also quite affordable. By inviting people to host parties in their homes you help to add to the social scene. Generally expatriates have a bit of spare cash too.’ ..."
"...or service to a range of markets. He may sell from business to business (B to B), from business to institution (B to I) or from business to consumer (B to C). Those who are living outside their passport country may like to consider a fourth option, that of expatriate to expatriate (E to E). My (Jo’s) own workshops and books are a case in point. I specialise in teaching people to write about their overseas experiences so my market is expatriates. However, while marketing to the expatriate community may seem like the most sensible option, ..."
438.
"... Challenge and Opportunity are the same. It really makes you think.’ Lisa, British in Italy, http://burntbythetuscansun.blogspot.com and www.expatwomen.com - Putting It All Together - All the exercises and activities you have completed to this point have generated a multitude of ..."

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"...Career resilience, an essential skill for expats and those creating a portable career, is defined by career coach Carole Pemberton as ‘holding the beliefs that enable flexibility in thought, behaviours and actions when facing adversity’. Adversity can be seen as any situation which challenges your ability to come up with solutions and alternatives. According to ..."
55.
"... last and you’ll have another chance in another country. ‘Finding a job in Nigeria when everyone had said it was impossible [was my greatest moment]. I was, at the time, the only expatriate wife in full-time employment.’ Els, Dutch in Oman, www.careerinyoursuitcase.com - Cultural ..."
"...expatsome time to assess your own culture to become aware of how it influences your behaviour, and explore where you would be willing to adapt and be flexible in order to be successful in another culture. For example, in order to be successful as a woman working in a male-dominated ..."
"...‘The greatest expat lesson I learned was from my son Alex, when he was five, in a French ski resort. One evening after dinner the kids went sledding, and I watched from a distance as Alex dragged his sled up the hill, alongside an older boy, and they seemed to be having ..."
87.
"... when I don’t understand what people are saying; I just nod and say oui.” That’s the lesson: nod and say yes.’ Chris Pavone, Author of the novel expats - Influencing Factors - These things are so important to your wellbeing that without them you could not consider a ..."
234.
"... The owner of the company loves me, he knows that I am proving that point and he gets a full day’s work out of me.’ Lizzy, British in America, www.expatwomen.com Think laterally Wikipedia defines Lateral Thinking as ‘solving problems through an indirect and creative approach, ..."
"...many careers are open to the artist. You can teach, you can become a tour guide of artistic areas and even charge more because of that expertise. You can write about your work or local traditions. Of course you can produce your art and sell it too, and most expatriate locations have several annual craft fairs, it is a marvellous career. My father says that you can never have too much education, and by that he means that knowledge and experience are totally portable. My kiln may not fit in my suitcase but my knowledge weighs nothing.’ ..."
338.
"... money, coming home with the wrong thing and then not having the courage to go back and tell the shop.’ Belinda, Dutch and now in Holland, The expatriate Archive, OAC5/3/3 Problems that exist here and have caught my attention: Keep your eyes open It’s important you don’t ..."
362.
"... who are going to work there. They call me to give lessons in our language… usually 20 to 30 hours or so.’ Zohra, Malaysian in Holland, The expatriate Archive, OAC5/3/3 Look on the Internet Many country or city-focused websites advertise local information and job ..."
451.
"... needs. Consider your own needs before you decide to work virtually. ‘When we lived in Sweden, I worked from home, online for an American organisation that provided their clients with “outsourced” expat support.’ Victoria, New Zealander now in India, ..."
453.
"... from home, online for an American organisation that provided their clients with “outsourced” expat support.’ Victoria, New Zealander now in India, www.expatwomen.com Flexitime This is a boon to parents who want to be home when their children go to school, or ready to greet them ..."
469.
"... expatriate spouse expert Robin Pascoe says, ‘Many expatriate women’s organisations in foreign countries organise welfare committees to allow members to channel energy, money and resources into local causes in a way that won’t overwhelm them. Frontline volunteering is not for everyone.’ ..."
491.
"... the spectrum than ‘small business owner’. If this sounds like something for you, you can read more about it in Chapter 7 — Working for Yourself, in Jo’s book, expat Entrepreneur, or Laptop Entrepreneur by Nick Snelling and Graham Hunt. - Researching Options - It is important to ..."
607.
"... way we worked when we were setting up the business. Nowadays it is less necessary as the pressure has reduced somewhat.’ Diane, Canadian in England, www.expatwomen.com ‘[I believe in] making plans, which set goals and objectives to be achieved within specified time periods. As an ..."
623.
"... The owner of the company loves me, he knows that I am proving that point and he gets a full day’s work out of me.’ Lizzy, British in America, www.expatwomen.com Think laterally Wikipedia defines Lateral Thinking as ‘solving problems through an indirect and creative approach, ..."
"...‘I really struggled giving up my work, identity and financial independence in Shanghai to move to Russia with my boyfriend. I suddenly became a ‘nobody’ in a very small expat community and a very un-dynamic city, which was a very big blow to my self-esteem and my motivation. I decided I needed to feel like I achieved something at the end of each day, no matter how small and so started writing a list of things I would do ..."
627.
"... that a job does not define who I am), but I still plan what I’m going to achieve tomorrow, the night before.’ Victoria, New Zealander, now in India, www.expatwomen.com Now you will develop more specifics for your mission statement. STATE YOUR GOALS Determine the reasons why you ..."

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Chapter 5: Networking
"...start your career better than networking. In a new location, you can start networking straight away, if not before you arrive, by making contact with people to whom you have been referred by your contacts in the previous location. You can also use a search engine to discover other expats through their blogs and online activities. Statistics say that 65 to 75 percent of work opportunities are found through networking rather than through things like recruitment agencies, advertised vacancies and Internet postings. ..."
113.
"... through to the sites of those who are featured there, and get in touch. Expat sites Sites such as: www.expatexchange.com www.expatwomen.com www.expatica.com www.paguro.net To help you to connect with other expatriates in your new location before you arrive. Try ..."
115.
"... www.expatwomen.com www.expatica.com www.paguro.net To help you to connect with other expatriates in your new location before you arrive. Try www.newcomersclub.com to find out about existing networking groups. Online networks Of course, there are plenty of networks out ..."
"...the editor to connect you with the author or search for them online yourself. The editor will be delighted to get some feedback and know the articles are of interest. Magazines such as Transitions Abroad, American in Britain and Global Living Magazine tend to be written by and for expatriates. If you want to make new friends, try contacting the people who write or feature in these and other similar magazines, blogs and newsletters. ..."
219.
"... details appear at the end • I offer to speak at local club meetings and events, often for free. • I take a table at newcomers’ and other events where there will be lots of expats present • I place my books for sale in suitable outlets and leave my flyers and adverts in places ..."
220.
"... take a table at newcomers’ and other events where there will be lots of expats present • I place my books for sale in suitable outlets and leave my flyers and adverts in places frequented by expats • I offer everyone the chance to sign up to The Inspirer newsletter • I give prizes ..."
"...Dr Copeland’s research proved without doubt that local friendships are of vital importance on overseas assignment, particularly for the accompanying partner. Women are largely conditioned to accept that coffee mornings are an inevitable part of expat life. Although women who don’t have children comment that they feel uneasy in this environment, men feel even less comfortable. It can be difficult for a man to feel relaxed in such a group, particularly if he’s the only male in sight. Many of these great organisations, such as ..."
"...‘Many of the problems men encounter are not dissimilar to those experienced by women,’ says expatriate Australian Leonie Elphinstone, who conducted a survey into the male accompanying partner. ‘What makes the difference is that men are brought up to be the breadwinners and when things go wrong they find they have further to fall.’ While men need to make new friends on location as much ..."
"...humorous and immensely useful. Six months later I (Jo) found myself being the guest speaker at a WIN meeting, talking about my pet subject: portable careers. Three months later I was paid to develop and present a three-hour workshop on the same subject to a group of about 20 expatriate women. A year later I presented the same workshop to more than 100 people at the 1998 Women on the Move Conference in Paris. Since then I have offered keynotes, seminars or workshops to networking groups, companies and conference delegates all over the world. ..."
590.
"... to reach the next floor to answer in a compelling way. The elevator pitch I used failed to describe every aspect of my work and did not mention I specialised in expat issues. It did pique Dave’s interest enough for him to say: ‘Oh! What sort of books?’ ‘Living abroad, mainly. ..."
"...expat Pavone, author of the bestselling novel expats, says his answer to the ‘what do you do’ questions encountered at parties was, “I take care of the children, and the house, and I try not to go insane.” While this wouldn’t have opened doors professionally it certainly lowered the barriers ..."
"...will be no opportunity to take questions. In this case you may need to work a little harder at your pitch, in order to make it memorable. When I am in this situation I tend to tailor what I say to the audience. So, if I am speaking to expatriates I may say something like: ..."

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"...expatticism of this type of website expressed by Nick Usborne, as quoted in Future expat’s online book Untether Yourself, is that it turns your service or skill into a commodity where the level of competition is the price alone and not your talents. Don’t underestimate the value of the ..."
153.
"... notifications let me know of openings in the company. Ultimately I got my ‘in’ because the recruiter was Irish.’ Lizzy, British in America, www.expatwomen.com ‘I found the Internet an invaluable tool for job related information either directly or by finding a contact and then ..."
"...‘I found the Internet an invaluable tool for job related information either directly or by finding a contact and then contacting them directly. I have had two experiences of using the Internet to find employment. I subscribe to a few expat/HR type online newsletters and within my first week of being in Mumbai came across an advertisement from an American intercultural consulting company looking for representatives in Mumbai. I got that job.’ ..."
157.
"... from an American intercultural consulting company looking for representatives in Mumbai. I got that job.’ Victoria, New Zealander in India, www.expatwomen.com Online job listings According to the 2011 QuintCareers Annual Report on the State of Internet Job Search, the future ..."
"...2. Affinity or Specialist sites are geared toward a particular segment of the job seeking public, such as teens, women, disabled people, professionals making over $100,000 a year, graduates of particular institutions, association members, freelancers, expats and so on. Affinity site www.expatica.com may have a list of vacancies for your current location. ..."
193.
"... receive hundreds of resumes. Stand out with a well-printed resume.’ Ursula, South African in America, www.marketingmentorexpert.com and www.expatwomen.com Here are two sources of online job postings for portable careers: Partnerjob If you are a supporting spouse and your partner’s ..."
520.
"... notifications let me know of openings in the company. Ultimately I got my ‘in’ because the recruiter was Irish.’ Lizzy, British in America, www.expatwomen.com ‘I found the Internet an invaluable tool for job related information either directly or by finding a contact and then ..."

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"...Many expatriate wives lose their identity and self-confidence when they go round the world. Many [women] lose the same when they have children. But for the trailing spouse they often have both of these to contend with. I have never suffered from this because I have always known that I ..."
"...When I (Jo) returned to the UK in 1997 I wanted to find work as a bit of an expat expert, helping people solve their career problems. But, back home, I was no longer in the ‘expat bubble’ and felt isolated and unknown. So, I decided to form a group called Words That Work and invited fellow expat experts to pay me a very small fee, I think it ..."
"...expaten I decided to write Gardening in Oman and The Gulf I had to learn to use a word processor. expatriate life is full of talented women who are not working full time and a friend taught me how, for free. Another friend taught me how to take photographs. Sometimes ..."
172.
"... lists of networking groups, professional groups, business groups and Chambers of Commerce. • Ask people who have been living in your location for a while, even your local expat advice service. • Look in the classified advertisements section of local papers, magazines, newsletters ..."
"...‘We had been running an After-School Tuition Centre in the UK for some years and due to a deep personal interest in living in Egypt decided to look at starting a similar project there, primarily aimed at expat families struggling with transitioning to a foreign country with their children. Before even beginning to set up the business however it was vital to analyse what had made the UK enterprise a success, and to evaluate whether the same key aspects would deliver the same results in an entirely ..."
184.
"... a completely different business strategy, and not taking this into consideration would have meant a much harder struggle.’ Diane, Canadian in England, www.expatwomen.com What to charge Whether you are providing a service, product or consultancy you need to employ the same basic rules if ..."
"...‘I really enjoy teaching people new things and there are always plenty of people on the expatriate circuit desperate to learn from an English speaker in a relaxed environment. I worked out of my home and had two computers so I could teach up to four people at a time. I taught beginners and intermediates about computers, operating systems, word processing, spreadsheets and graphics. I charged ..."
233.
"... Idea, but if you can’t get out there and sell it, you might as well stay home and make cookies.’ Lisa, British in Italy, http://burntbythetuscansun.blogspot.com and www.expatwomen.com If you are lucky enough to have your target market on your doorstep then you could do very well indeed ..."
"...cheap. They were nutritious and delicious too. Dates were everywhere but few people knew how versatile they could be in your cookery. We had a target market on our doorstep. The first edition of the book was in Arabic and English, so our market extended from the English speaking expats there to the locals. ..."
259.
"... volunteering for charitable organisations as well. People remember those who take the extra initiatives.’ Carol, American, http://delhi4cats.wordpress.com and www.expatwomen.com ATTEND BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL MEETINGS If you are a brochure designer, you will not just want to attend ..."
"...in your local paper. Get your business listed in the Yellow Pages, their website www.yell.com or your local equivalent. You can also buy a display advertisement in Yellow Pages type publications as your business grows or as an initial investment in its growth. If your target market is local expat women, then you may be better off advertising in the local school or women’s club magazines. Go where you feel you have the best chance of finding potential clients. These days you can also advertise on the Internet using Google’s AdWords, Facebook adverts or LinkedIn’s targeted advertising features. All ..."
320.
"... business strategy, and not taking this into consideration would have meant a much harder struggle.’ Diane, Canadian in England, www.expatwomen.com What to charge Whether you are providing a service, product or consultancy you need to employ the same basic rules if you’re going ..."
"...First you need to buy a domain name that will be easy for people to remember. You could play safe and buy your name. I (Jo) own www.joparfitt.com in addition to my other websites www.summertimepublishing.com, www.expatbookshop. com and www.writelifestory.com. You can search to see which sites are available at www.yahoo.com and from many other sites including www.godaddy.com, which I use. Key in the name you would like and see if it is available. If it is, then great, buy it and ask a webmaster ..."
399.
"... there and sell it, you might as well stay home and make cookies.’ Lisa, British in Italy, http://burntbythetuscansun.blogspot.com and www.expatwomen.com If you are lucky enough to have your target market on your doorstep then you could do very well indeed - providing you get out there ..."
404.
"... there and sell it, you might as well stay home and make cookies.’ Lisa, British in Italy, http://burntbythetuscansun.blogspot.com and www.expatwomen.com If you are lucky enough to have your target market on your doorstep then you could do very well indeed - providing you get out there ..."
454.
"... there and sell it, you might as well stay home and make cookies.’ Lisa, British in Italy, http://burntbythetuscansun.blogspot.com and www.expatwomen.com If you are lucky enough to have your target market on your doorstep then you could do very well indeed - providing you get out there ..."
513.
"... and included things that were important to my ‘wellbeing’ and work life balance such as friends and exercise.’ Victoria, New Zealander in India, www.expatwomen.com ..."
574.
"... business strategy, and not taking this into consideration would have meant a much harder struggle.’ Diane, Canadian in England, www.expatwomen.com What to charge Whether you are providing a service, product or consultancy you need to employ the same basic rules if you’re going ..."
578.
"... a completely different business strategy, and not taking this into consideration would have meant a much harder struggle.’ Diane, Canadian in England, www.expatwomen.com What to charge Whether you are providing a service, product or consultancy you need to employ the same basic rules if ..."
596.
"... business strategy, and not taking this into consideration would have meant a much harder struggle.’ Diane, Canadian in England, www.expatwomen.com What to charge Whether you are providing a service, product or consultancy you need to employ the same basic rules if you’re going ..."
606.
"... and not part of a team. Something I particularly like. I would also find myself doing housework in between working.’ Lizzy, British in America, www.expatwomen.com ..."

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Chapter 8: For the Journey
24.
"... to speak the language, preferably a local, as misunderstandings are inevitable if you do business in English only.’ Diane, Canadian in England, www.expatwomen.com ‘It is a not to be missed opportunity. Come with an open mind and not your predisposed concepts of the world. This way ..."
54.
"... my colleagues, peers and my clients. I felt I didn’t belong.’ Ursula, South African in America, www.marketingmentorexpert.com and www.expatwomen.com What can help us say goodbye? Every year thousands of domestically and internationally relocating families have discovered that ..."
75.
"... the language, preferably a local, as misunderstandings are inevitable if you do business in English only.’ Diane, Canadian in England, www.expatwomen.com ‘It is a not to be missed opportunity. Come with an open mind and not your predisposed concepts of the world. This way you will leave ..."
96.
"... the language, preferably a local, as misunderstandings are inevitable if you do business in English only.’ Diane, Canadian in England, www.expatwomen.com ‘It is a not to be missed opportunity. Come with an open mind and not your predisposed concepts of the world. This way you will leave ..."
"...expatriates often sense their differences from the local community, but a couple consisting of a working woman and an accompanying male partner is likely to be different not only from the local community, but from the rest of the expatriate community too. This complete sense of difference can be an isolating experience and can become problematic, especially for the male accompanying partner who doesn’t even have his job to base their joint identity on. Problems are most likely to arise when the male accompanying partner feels undervalued ..."
"...expatn Westwood, director of expat Care for International Health Management in Toronto, believes that you can look to your past for inspiration. If you look back to other times when you have failed but managed to pull through, you should be able to identify the actions you took ..."
"...to a new culture. A 2010 study by Regula Sindemann, as described in the February 2012 expat Women blog, provides some insights. CQ is defined as one’s ability to function effectively in culturally diverse situations. This study found a significant correlation between CQ and the expressed satisfaction level of expat spouses and partners. CQ motivation, strategy and action all play an important role, in many cases more important than CQ knowledge alone. Learned capabilities are emphasized in CQ more than personality traits. It is encouraging to know CQ can be influenced by experience and training and can therefore be ..."
146.
"... there is always someone around who can help, if you only start talking and asking for what it is that you need.’ Jutta, Dutch in Singapore, on LinkedIn Group: expat Web LEARNING THE LANGUAGE One thing you can do to set you ahead of the game is to learn the local language. Culture and ..."
"...the local language. Culture and language are inseparable. The key to understanding most cultures lies in the languages spoken there. The standard greeting in most Asian countries is ‘have you eaten rice yet?’ What does this tell you about the importance of food in these cultures? Yet, strangely, many expatriates will decide learning the local language is unnecessary, too much work, impossible, or all three and not attempt it. Showing a curiosity for the local people and their culture through learning the language demonstrates respect for them and where you are now living. ..."
159.
"... my colleagues, peers and my clients. I felt I didn’t belong.’ Ursula, South African in America, www.marketingmentorexpert.com and www.expatwomen.com What can help us say goodbye? Every year thousands of domestically and internationally relocating families have discovered that ..."
163.
"... the language, preferably a local, as misunderstandings are inevitable if you do business in English only.’ Diane, Canadian in England, www.expatwomen.com ‘It is a not to be missed opportunity. Come with an open mind and not your predisposed concepts of the world. This way you will leave ..."
"...‘Naturally without having fluency in the Arabic language results in communication gaps and loss of revenue. In my capacity as a founding partner of Global Watchers Arabia the focus at present is predominantly on the expat community within Saudi Arabia and clients from the rest of the English-speaking world [ … ] any business with a Saudi company requires discussions and written communication in Arabic, especially in regards to legal documents and contracts. Therefore to pursue and interact with Saudi clients results in GWA ..."
168.
"... the language, preferably a local, as misunderstandings are inevitable if you do business in English only.’ Diane, Canadian in England, www.expatwomen.com ‘It is a not to be missed opportunity. Come with an open mind and not your predisposed concepts of the world. This way you will leave ..."
172.
"... express myself well. Business language in South Africa is different than in the United States.’ Ursula, South African in America, www.marketingmentorexpert.com and www.expatwomen.com OPTIMISM Optimism is a key quality needed for successful entrepreneurs. Psychologist Martin ..."
"...and different strategies for getting around those blocks – to sticking to a plan of action. For me, the benefits of having balance – such as health, peace, opportunity to spend time with friends and my husband – are things that keep me in check. Since I work with expats, I often work with them to identify what drew them to their new home country and find ways to get them to use that interest to engage with their home/community. I find that helps many people find more work/life balance.’ ..."
229.
"... to speak the language, preferably a local, as misunderstandings are inevitable if you do business in English only.’ Diane, Canadian in England, www.expatwomen.com ‘It is a not to be missed opportunity. Come with an open mind and not your predisposed concepts of the world. This way ..."
306.
"... to speak the language, preferably a local, as misunderstandings are inevitable if you do business in English only.’ Diane, Canadian in England, www.expatwomen.com ‘It is a not to be missed opportunity. Come with an open mind and not your predisposed concepts of the world. This way ..."
315.
"... my colleagues, peers and my clients. I felt I didn’t belong.’ Ursula, South African in America, www.marketingmentorexpert.com and www.expatwomen.com What can help us say goodbye? Every year thousands of domestically and internationally relocating families have discovered that ..."
317.
"... South African in America, www.marketingmentorexpert.com and www.expatwomen.com ‘A beer always helps and having joined an expat group in Denver, it’s a great release.’ Lizzy, British in America, www.expatwomen.com Spirituality Try to find time to be a human ..."
319.
"... www.expatwomen.com ‘A beer always helps and having joined an expat group in Denver, it’s a great release.’ Lizzy, British in America, www.expatwomen.com Spirituality Try to find time to be a human being rather than a human doing. It is easy to neglect being as we rush ..."
389.
"... to speak the language, preferably a local, as misunderstandings are inevitable if you do business in English only.’ Diane, Canadian in England, www.expatwomen.com ‘It is a not to be missed opportunity. Come with an open mind and not your predisposed concepts of the world. This way ..."
398.
"... my colleagues, peers and my clients. I felt I didn’t belong.’ Ursula, South African in America, www.marketingmentorexpert.com and www.expatwomen.com What can help us say goodbye? Every year thousands of domestically and internationally relocating families have discovered that ..."
401.
"... www.expatwomen.com ‘A beer always helps and having joined an expat group in Denver, it’s a great release.’ Lizzy, British in America, www.expatwomen.com Spirituality Try to find time to be a human being rather than a human doing. It is easy to neglect being as we rush ..."
406.
"... the language, preferably a local, as misunderstandings are inevitable if you do business in English only.’ Diane, Canadian in England, www.expatwomen.com ‘It is a not to be missed opportunity. Come with an open mind and not your predisposed concepts of the world. This way you will leave ..."
"...expat are many people offering coaching these days. They may call themselves a Life Coach, Business Coach, Executive Coach, Transformational Coach, Personal Coach, expat Coach or a Career Coach. Some offer a combination of business and life coaching, others combine general life direction coaching with career advice. All coaches ..."
525.
"... www.expatwomen.com ‘A beer always helps and having joined an expat group in Denver, it’s a great release.’ Lizzy, British in America, www.expatwomen.com Spirituality Try to find time to be a human being rather than a human doing. It is easy to neglect being as we rush ..."
577.
"... person; do they inspire your confidence and trust? Do they listen well and are they collaborative in their approach? Career development professionals for expatriates As this book amply demonstrates with its numerous personal stories, pursuing career goals can be more complicated and ..."
"...A growing number of Career Development Professionals are specialised and experienced in working with expat clients. They can assist with researching the prospects in the area you will be moving to. The professionals based in the country you move to should have a close acquaintance with the pertinent rules and regulations governing the work options of foreign nationals. Nevertheless, you may find it easier ..."

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