The Global Nomad's Guide to University Transition

emergency

This is a list of how often and where the term 'emergency' appears in the book The Global Nomad's Guide to University Transition.


Search result for 'emergency' in The Global Nomad's Guide to University Transition

170.
"... a change in voltage? - Other Practicalities - ▪ How will you be getting to your campus? ▪ What will you do in case of an emergency? Who will you use as an emergency contact? ▪ What will be your system for communicating back home? ▪ Banking needs – checking account, ..."

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52.
"... for other purposes. Become familiar with how to use the postal system, public transportation system and how your insurance works. - In Case of emergency - Know what to do in an emergency or crisis: ▪ Plan ahead what you will do, who you will call. ▪ Have emergency numbers in ..."
54.
"... how to use the postal system, public transportation system and how your insurance works. - In Case of Emergency - Know what to do in an emergency or crisis: ▪ Plan ahead what you will do, who you will call. ▪ Have emergency numbers in your cell phone. ▪ When in doubt ..."
57.
"... of Emergency - Know what to do in an emergency or crisis: ▪ Plan ahead what you will do, who you will call. ▪ Have emergency numbers in your cell phone. ▪ When in doubt of who to call, you can turn to the International Students services. ▪ Decide when you will inform ..."
"...It can be exciting to achieve the instant independence that comes when that umbilical chord is severed and you have your new wings, but it can also be a little scary and lonely. Parents are no longer around to bail you out. In fact, unless it is an emergency or something that would threaten your continued attendance at the school, your parents may remain oblivious to your escapades. You are 18 years old now, an adult who is legally responsible for your own behavior. Many schools assign student advisors to their first-year students who can help in the ..."
"...in the U.S. and U.K. is kids leaving home and experimenting with drinking and drugs in the relative anonymity of their campus life regardless of whether it is legal, as in the U.K., or illegal. Drinking games, binge drinking, over-drinking to the point of necessitating a visit to the emergency room (if they are lucky enough to survive) due to alcohol poisoning and getting passed-out drunk for entertainment purposes is common on some campuses. Granted, some of this behavior starts in high school and the freedom students find while attending college or university adds fuel to the fire. ..."

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"...as well as their parents if a security incident is taking place, complete with information on where to go and what to do. Many colleges have switched over to the electronic student ID card that must be swiped to gain access to dorms and other services. Students are given emergency numbers for calling campus security to handle everything from theft to illness or accident to assault to chaperoning a female student back to her dorm late at night. ..."
112.
"... ▪ Know who and how to call should problems or concerns arise. ▪ Be sure to put the campus security emergency call number into your cell phone for easy access dialing. Better yet, make it a speed dial number. ▪ Don’t go jogging late at night or early in the morning unless you ..."
"...usually enough for a student starting off. Be sure you can afford the minimum monthly payment on any credit account you open. Even if you plan on never using a credit card, it is a good idea to have one you can use in the case of an emergency such as an air fare for an unexpected trip home. Our daughters got their first credit card when they went abroad for a semester since we did not want them to be stuck if something unexpected came up. ..."

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"...phone service. Students tend to use their cell phones to text message each other their location, plans for the evening and where to meet up to have a meal together rather than making calls and using up their minutes. Many parents prefer their child has a cell phone for emergency purposes. By the time you have bought ..."
"...If this panic phone call does turn out to be something serious, it can be difficult to keep your wits about you, but you must try to stay calm and reassuring. Depending on the type of emergency (anything from health to academics), there will be resources in place on your child’s campus to handle it. ..."

Search result for 'emergency' in the FAQs of The Global Nomad's Guide to University Transition

There were no results for 'emergency' in the FAQs of The Global Nomad's Guide to University Transition

Search result for 'emergency' in Glossary of The Global Nomad's Guide to University Transition

There were no results for 'emergency' in the the Glossary of The Global Nomad's Guide to University Transition

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"Tina Quick's writing style is sincere and her seasoned expertise is evident. The stories and vignettes in her book show..."

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