The Global Nomad's Guide to University Transition

emotions

This is a list of how often and where the term 'emotions' appears in the book The Global Nomad's Guide to University Transition.


Search result for 'emotions' in The Global Nomad's Guide to University Transition

"...of her childhood in Switzerland, is attending a small liberal arts college on the east coast of the U.S. She asked me to read journal entries she had written during her semester abroad to China. She needed to talk with someone who could help her make sense of the emotions she experienced during the different phases of her travels. Through the sensitive, insightful and descriptive entries in those crinkled and folded pages I was able to follow her journey through each of the three most difficult stages of transition – leaving, transition and entering. Whether you are leaving for ..."
2.
"... her permission to reprint sections of her journals to help you, the reader, as you experience or anticipate your own transition. - Conflicted emotions - Typically, the leaving stage of the transition cycle begins the moment you are aware of an upcoming change. Notice, Marie is ..."
42.
"... her permission to reprint sections of her journals to help you, the reader, as you experience or anticipate your own transition. - Conflicted emotions - Typically, the leaving stage of the transition cycle begins the moment you are aware of an upcoming change. Notice, Marie is ..."
"...Without realizing it, parents often do not allow themselves or their children to grieve. They tend to focus on the cognitive reasons for the move, rather than on the emotions created by the move. They can be so anxious for their children to settle in that instead of comforting them and acknowledging their fears and sadness, they encourage them by saying things like, “Don’t worry, you will make new friends soon.” Or they may negate the grief by telling ..."

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Chapter 4: Fish Out of Water
"...transition stage at the very beginning of this chapter. The highs and lows will eventually become less and less frequent over time. Emotional instability is another trademark of the transition stage, but remember it is predictable and expected. The first few weeks and months are full of wildly fluctuating emotions. Students can be thrilled and excited about many aspects of their campus, love all their classes, be making new friends and joining new activities one day and be full of insecurity and sadness the next. Feelings of self-doubt begin to take over: ..."
174.
"... - Hitting the Dip - Once the honeymoon period is over reality begins to set in and feelings of fun and excitement give way to a whole spectrum of emotions. Let’s have a look at the types of emotional reactions you may encounter once the newness has worn off. - Flip Flopping Emotions ..."
176.
"... spectrum of emotions. Let’s have a look at the types of emotional reactions you may encounter once the newness has worn off. - Flip Flopping emotions - Human beings bring order into their lives by creating routines. These routines become so well-rehearsed that you get to the point ..."
"...A particular but unexpected smell may set off your olfactory nerve or a familiar sound will momentarily transport you back to your host country and have your emotions flip flopping back and forth. You may even have recurring dreams of the country you have left and those dreams may be in the other language you spoke as we can see from Marie, our semester abroad student. She flip flops between cultures in this dream which, despite studying ..."
"...The chaos and culture shock in the transition stage may seem a bit daunting, but now that you are aware of these emotions and reactions, you won’t be so surprised when they come at you. They are to be expected. They will hit some students harder than others, but be assured, everyone will feel something. Learn to be flexible at this time. Give yourself and others a little slack. Everything is so ..."

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"...stage. This stage begins when you decide, either consciously or unconsciously, that you are going to settle in and connect with this new place. Unlike the leaving stage which ends when you land in the new place, the Transition stage does not have a clear-cut ending. Many of the emotions and reactions we talked about in the Transition stage continue on into the Entering stage. ..."
183.
"... It is again time to name those losses, spend time with the grief associated with the loss, bring them to closure, and move forward. - emotions Still in Flux - It is not at all uncommon in the Transition and Entering stages to have really good days interspersed with down days, blue days ..."
"...all uncommon in the Transition and Entering stages to have really good days interspersed with down days, blue days with happy days, wildly exciting days with it-couldn’t-get-any-worse days. The grief versus depression we discussed in Chapter 4 is still an issue that hangs around in the Entering phase. Fluctuating emotions and bouts of homesickness still ply you even though things are beginning to settle and take shape in your life. Although you have the desire to settle in, it is still a stressful time. It is important to continue to pay attention to taking care of yourself and preventing ..."
"...No matter how irritable or hostile you may be feeling, don’t give in to the temptation to mock or belittle your culture. It is very easy to get caught up in negative emotions when someone else starts groaning about the culture, but if you join in, it can get out of hand and put you on the wrong footing to settle in and make friends in this place. ..."
"...students on the Tufts University campus, one young woman stated that she was only then (eight weeks or half-way into the term) able to take a deep breath and not feel so scrambled. She went on to say that she was beginning to feel homesick and was experiencing vacillating emotions, things she did not have time for before. She was most likely experiencing that overlapping time between the Transition stage and the Entering stage in the second half of the first term. ..."

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"...you or anyone else. You have more in common than you might think. Everyone has the same basic human needs: to be in relationship with others, to belong, to be understood, to be creative, to be able to express themselves, and much more. Domestics and TCKs have the same emotions, feelings, cares, concerns and problems. No one is immune to hurt, betrayal, embarrassment, frustration or confusion. Try to keep that in perspective when you find yourself becoming annoyed or things aren’t moving the way you would want. ..."

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3.
"... your life. Know that you are going through the stages of transition. You know what to expect and you understand that your wildly fluctuating emotions and sense of chaos are all a normal part of the process. And best of all, you know how to deal with it. (If not, go back and re-read!) Know what ..."
"...With this in mind, guard your hearts. There are a lot of young people out there who just want to sow their wild oats and don’t care about your emotions. They are not going to fall in love with you because they have had sex with you. You will be fortunate if they even remember your name. In fact, dating in the States has been called ‘predatory.’ Upperclassmen are known for vulgarly referring to first-year students as “Freshmen meat.” ..."

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76.
"... - The summer before the start of university is a truly bizarre and completely incomprehensible time. It is the leaving stage at its height, full of see-sawing emotions and ambiguity. Parents need to allow the young person (and their siblings) the time and space to leave and grieve. - ..."
"...the community, or everything about his or her way of living in this place compared to college? Suggest names for these and allow his thought process to lead him to the point of grieving them. Adolescents are not necessarily going to open up the floodgates and pour out their emotions but the process of naming their losses and grieving them is begun. ..."
"...Sometimes your children need to turn back to the security and familiarity of home where they know they can find affirmation and unconditional love. Even if the phone calls aren’t full of panic, they are likely to be full of see-sawing emotions as your child goes through the chaos of the transition stage and the ups and downs of the entering stage which may last well into the second semester or even second year. ..."

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Entering Stage
Leaving Stage
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"This book is filled with superb materials to help global nomads stay the course during their transition to university. Tina..."

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