The Global Nomad's Guide to University Transition

overseas

This is a list of how often and where the term 'overseas' appears in the book The Global Nomad's Guide to University Transition.


Search result for 'overseas' in The Global Nomad's Guide to University Transition

"...My first adult overseas posting could have ended in disaster if someone had not forewarned me what I could expect to experience. My husband and I were preparing to move our very young family to Peshawar, Pakistan, widely acknowledged as being quite a difficult place to live, especially for women. I did a ..."
"...Dave Pollock, interculturalist and founder of Interaction International (an organization dedicated to being a catalyst to help all organizations who send families with children overseas know how to do it better), spent a lot of time in Nairobi, Kenya, in the 1970’s working with expatriate students. He began to notice issues and attitudes with which these students and others like them in other parts of the world struggled. Upon returning to the U.S. he ..."

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Chapter 4: Fish Out of Water
"...overseasram below, adapted from L. Robert Kohl’s Survival Kit for overseas Living, shows the stages of culture shock or country shock. When it is experienced upon repatriation it is often referred to as reverse culture shock or re-entry shock. Regardless of the name, the experience is the same whether you ..."
"...the crisis stage of transition shock. It is indicated by the curve, mentioned earlier, a dip down from the normal level of feeling. You are still feeling overwhelmed with all the changes. You also feel marginalized, at the edges of society, like a minority. That’s because you are. Your overseas life has changed you, and people don’t understand what kind of influence an international upbringing has had on you, so you appear a little ‘weird.’ You are the “hidden immigrants” we will talk about in Chapter 5. ..."
"... There may still be much you don’t care for in this new place, but you can now sort out things you were not so fond of overseas either. Your perspective is changing. You are balancing your experiences. You begin to relax and develop some routines which help bring structure and propel you forward. ..."

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"...Online communities like TCKid.com are growing by the day. There are many out there. You just need to know where to look. TCKs come from many backgrounds depending on the type of work which took their parents overseas. They may be from the corporate sector, the military, missionary, foreign service, humanitarian/non-profit world, education and so forth. If you can identify your sector, you will most likely be able to find an online community already established for kids that have shared your particular lifestyle. For instance the ..."

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"...All the time we lived overseas my children would answer the “Where are you from?” question with, “I’m American.” Now that we were back “home” America didn’t really feel like home. Switzerland felt more like home, but she couldn’t say that she was Swiss. Because TCKs build relationships with all the cultures they live in, ..."
"...As a result of her research and conversations, Dr. Schaetti found that people who had relatively easy identity Encounter experiences related to growing up globally were introduced to the terms ‘global nomad’ and ‘third culture kid’ while still living overseas, or were introduced to the terms upon repatriation via re-entry training. She mentions that even if a term such as ‘military brat’, ‘oil brat’ or ‘missionary kid’ was used in place of the TCK or GN term, these children at least had a notion that there was something special ..."

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Global Nomad
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"Tina Quick's initiative and book is a brilliant revelation of the phenomena of Third Culture Kids and their many challenges..."

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