What about your saucepans
Ten years in the life of a British woman
living in the Dominican Republic

What does 'Barahona' mean?

Find out what Barahona means. Barahona is explained by Lindsay de Feliz - author of What about your saucepans

Barahona

Barahona is situated in the south west of the Dominican Republic around three hours by car west of the capital, Santo Domingo. It is one of the most diverse areas in the country, being part mountain range, part desert, part coastline. The geography is awe inspiring, with the mountains literally descending directly into the ocean. It was one of the first areas occupied by the Spanish, and for centuries was occupied by Haitians who founded the City of Barahona in 1802. Once the Haitians left, it reverted to being Dominican with a population now of around 200,000 in the province as a whole, and 100,000 in the town itself. At present there is little tourism and that fact that it is so unspoiled it what makes it so special. However there are plans for development in the pipeline.

Chapter two of the book will give you much more insight as to how the people live in Barahona and the surrounding mountain area. It really is like going back in time, with many people living without the comforts we take for granted, such as running water, electricity and indoor bathrooms.

Interestingly, Barahona is also the where larimar comes from, a beautiful turquoise blue stone, found only in the Dominican Republic and mined just outside of the town centre.

Search result for 'Barahona' in What about your saucepans

19.
"... on the policeman was always known as Picante. We met most evenings for the next couple of weeks, slowly learning about each other. Danilo told me he had been brought up in the mountains above Barahona, a town in the south west of the country. “What about your parents?” I asked. “They ..."
23.
"... I four years old and took me and my brother Biembo to live in La Loma.” “La Loma?” I asked. “It is the mountain above Barahona. We went on donkey, it take very many time and is cold.” “But what about food, were there shops? And where did you live?” I persisted. “My father, he ..."
47.
"... has another man. Then they live with my mother in capital, but my mother she die, so they live with me.” “So… where did you live in the capital. I thought you lived in Barahona?” “I move to capital when I eighteen. My father, he sell cow for clothes and passage. I go be a policeman, ..."
"...He wanted to show me Barahona, his hometown, so we rented an SUV, called known as a jipeta here, and off we went for the weekend. Danilo sitting next to me in the front and the kids in the back. It was a long drive, over four hours, all along the southern coast of the ..."
"...we went to the local pica pollo (fried chicken) shop in town for dinner. The next day Danilo’s brother, Cristian, came with us and we drove around the whole area. He was not Danilo’s blood brother, but Danilo had stayed with Cristian’s family while he went to school in Barahona. We drove along the coast road, stopping at places where the rivers running down from the mountains met the ocean, bathing in cold river water, whilst looking at the sea and feasting on fresh fish and frosty Presidente beer. ..."
"...We had a lovely time in Barahona and I could see why it had such a special place in his heart. It was very different from the tourist resort we lived in, and I loved having seen a completely different side to the island. Whilst I loved the ocean, I could certainly see the attraction of ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 8: The fight goes on
106.
"... too long to wait. We sat on the hotel balcony in the morning, listening to the radio. It was reported that everyone was looking for us. I was supposedly in England and Danilo in Barahona. They sent people to the house to find us and the press set up camp outside the gate. Nothing came from ..."

-------------------------------------------
Chapter 11: Hope
"... We had a piece of land in Barahona in the Loma where Danilo had been brought up. We had bought it several years earlier and luckily it had not been taken from us. We would be safe there, and I liked the idea of living on top of a mountain, with fantastic views and pottering on a ..."

Search result for 'Barahona' in the FAQs of What about your saucepans

There were no results for 'Barahona' in the FAQs of What about your saucepans

Search result for 'Barahona' in Glossary of What about your saucepans

Barahona
Reviews

"At times, readers will shake their heads at the frustrations and laugh at some of the absurd situations and statements..."

More Reviews
Share on Facebook Tweet This
Buy this book:
Visit the
What about your saucepans
website
Get a Book Preview website